Classics 1969 Camaro being built for performance!

20:20  08 september  2017
20:20  08 september  2017 Source:   HOT ROD

Why Are There 1970-1/2 Camaros?

  Why Are There 1970-1/2 Camaros? You may have noticed that some 1970 Camaros are designated 1970-1/2. Things had been right on schedule for the all-new Camaro body stampings at Fisher Body, when during what is called "final die tryouts" right before production stamping begins, the quarter-panels kept wrinkling and splitting. The body dies required too much draw for the sheetmetal to cooperate. Fisher decided to reconfigure the draw dies, which are the two halves needed to pound out a fender or panel from flat sheet stock. This required a short delay. Unfortunately, the resulting quarter-panels stamped from the new dies were worse than the previous attempt.

Classic Chevys are more loved for their classic lines than for their dated suspensions or even their cool sounding, but by today’s standards, power-lacking drivetrains. Given this, it’s no wonder that many gearheads opt to keep the body lines and update the rest.

The 1969 Camaro had been undergoing a complete restoration when the project ground to a halt. Since it was missing a drivetrain, something he would have discarded anyways, it was perfect for what he had in mind.

Classic Chevys are more loved for their classic lines than for their dated suspensions or even their cool sounding, but by today's standards, power-lacking drivetrains. Given this, it's no wonder that many gearheads opt to keep the body lines and update the rest. And that is exactly Tim Lee's goal with his 1969 Camaro project.

Meet The 409-Powered Camaro Chevrolet Should Have Built

  Meet The 409-Powered Camaro Chevrolet Should Have Built In 2009, Michael Feinstein, owner of Nostalgia Motor Sports, spotted a rendering in the September issue of HOT ROD created by artist Steve Stanford. It was a red 1969 Camaro, but it was unlike any of the Pro Touring F-bodies that had become popular. This car drew inspiration from Chevrolet’s late ‘50s and early ’60sIn 2009, Michael Feinstein, owner of Nostalgia Motor Sports, spotted a rendering in the September issue of HOT ROD created by artist Steve Stanford. It was a red 1969 Camaro, but it was unlike any of the Pro Touring F-bodies that had become popular.

1969 Chevrolet Camaro being built for performance ! “As the project progressed and as I saw the caliber of work that DSE performed firsthand, the project snowballed into something much more extreme.

1969 Chevrolet Camaro being built for performance ! Chris Carey (30) and Kyle Nelson (29) are the co-founders of Modern Automotive Performance (MAP) up there in the Minneapolis bedroom of Cottage Grove, hard by the Mississippi River.

Research

chevrolet camaro
chevrolet camaro

It all started with a stalled project Tim found local to him in Rancho Cucamonga, California. The 1969 Camaro had been undergoing a complete restoration when the project ground to a halt. Since it was missing a drivetrain, something he would have discarded anyways, it was perfect for what he had in mind. Before work stopped on the Camaro it had been body worked straight and shot in Aztec Gold period-correct paint. Tim dug the retro color, feeling it would add to the Camaro's sleeper status.

The first thing Tim did was to find a buyer for the car's restored, stock suspension. Once that was handled he called up Roadster Shop and ordered one of their new SPEC chassis. He had seen one of these in action last year and was impressed with how it handled and, of course, its price. He also liked that he would be able to just drop the old suspension out of the Camaro and lower the body onto the new SPEC chassis. Easy peasy. The Roadster Shop chassis came with Afco shocks and a Strange housing (with axles) so to finish it off he picked up a Strange third member and a complete Baer big-brake kit. He was even able to order the massive 6P calipers in matching Aztec gold!

To get some bigger tires under the back of the F-body he had Phil Mandella over at PMR Racing stitch in a set of Chassisworks deep wheeltubs and add in a four-point rollbar for extra safety when he hits the track. While that was going on the chassis was blown apart and sent over to Young Gun Powder Painting in Rancho Cucamonga. The Camaro will be motivated by a 440-inch, RHS-blocked LS engine backed by an American Powertrain TREMEC Magnum six-speed transmission. It should make for a retro-cool Camaro that will handle and ride better than a modern one.

Alex Covington’s Rampage 1970 Chevrolet Camaro is bad and bold—check it out! .
<p>A fitting name for a car designed to cause destruction among the competition.</p>Their in-house designer, Chris Gray, put the rendering together and the company presented it to car owner Alex Covington, who then made the decision to get the project underway. The Camaro, which was plucked from the desert, was super clean and straight, although covered in patina from sitting. It wore all original sheetmetal right down to the floors—a real rarity in this day and age—but was ripe for blasting to clean up the surfaces.

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