Motorcycles What Causes a Motorcycle To Smoke?

17:46  28 july  2017
17:46  28 july  2017 Source:   Motorcyclist

Quick Tips to Properly Break-In Your Engine and Motorcycle

  Quick Tips to Properly Break-In Your Engine and Motorcycle Do you break in your bike easy? Here's a tip to properly breaking in your ride We occasionally hear from owners of big twins that their bikes use too much oil, smoke or have other problems even though mileage is fairly low. When we ask about break-in procedure we inevitably hear that the owner “broke it in real easy.” In other words, they never did break it in. Because big twins make such good power at the lower portions of their powerbands, it’s possible to get perfectly acceptable performance out of them without running them hard. The problem is that unless your run them hard once in a while, you don’t put enough pressure on the piston rings so they seat fully, which can lead to oil-control problems and varnish on cylinder walls. Breaking in a new motorcycle involves lots of components from brake pads to valve seats to tires. There is always the possibility that something will crack or warp during break-in, so those initial miles should be ridden with some caution and an eye and ear alert for problems like leaks or unwanted noises. The heating and cooling process is also part of break-in; parts expand and contract and adjust to each other. By the time you have ridden 100 miles with no signs of problems, your engine should have gone through a few heat cycles, the brake linings should be adapting to their friction surfaces and the tires should be scuffed in enough to deliver good traction.

Do you have a high-mileage motorcycle that's beginning to smoke ? Here are the possible causes and what to do about it. Q: My Suzuki Intruder is an occasional smoker .

Motorcyclist 7/13/2017 Jerry Smith. © Julia LaPalme Smoking Suzuki. White smoke means coolant is finding its way into the combustion chamber, which can cause overheating. A bad head gasket is probably the culprit.

Smoking Suzuki.© Julia LaPalme Smoking Suzuki.

The color of your exhaust smoke holds the answer.

Q: My Suzuki Intruder is an occasional smoker. Most of the time it’s fine, but every once in a while I’ll glance back and it’ll look like I’m James Bond and I just pressed the smoke-screen button. It seems like it happens more when the bike is hot, but it doesn’t seem to matter if I’m accelerating or decelerating, which I vaguely remember a mechanic friend of mine saying would tell me something about the pistons or valves being the problem.

The bike is older, fully uncorked with a pipe, high-flow air filter, and jet kit. I ride it hard and it has about 60,000 miles on it, so I’m wondering if a valve job might be in order. Think that’ll fix my bike’s smoking habit? - Jeff Moore via email

Quick Tips to Properly Break-In Your Engine and Motorcycle

  Quick Tips to Properly Break-In Your Engine and Motorcycle Do you break in your bike easy? Here's a tip to properly breaking in your ride We occasionally hear from owners of big twins that their bikes use too much oil, smoke or have other problems even though mileage is fairly low. When we ask about break-in procedure we inevitably hear that the owner “broke it in real easy.” In other words, they never did break it in. Because big twins make such good power at the lower portions of their powerbands, it’s possible to get perfectly acceptable performance out of them without running them hard. The problem is that unless your run them hard once in a while, you don’t put enough pressure on the piston rings so they seat fully, which can lead to oil-control problems and varnish on cylinder walls. Breaking in a new motorcycle involves lots of components from brake pads to valve seats to tires. There is always the possibility that something will crack or warp during break-in, so those initial miles should be ridden with some caution and an eye and ear alert for problems like leaks or unwanted noises. The heating and cooling process is also part of break-in; parts expand and contract and adjust to each other. By the time you have ridden 100 miles with no signs of problems, your engine should have gone through a few heat cycles, the brake linings should be adapting to their friction surfaces and the tires should be scuffed in enough to deliver good traction.

Answers.com® WikiAnswers® Categories Cars & Vehicles Motorcycles Motorcycle and ATV Maintenance Suzuki Motorcycles What can cause white smoke on a motorcycle ? What causes white smoke to come from exhaust? White smoke means head gasket, cracked head or equivelant.

What causes motorcycle high speed vibration? I'm assuming this is a recent issue, probably a tire is out of balance or a bad wheel bearing, if it a existing condition, the bike may have a bent wheel from a previous owner…, if it's a modern vtwin, a bad motor What causes the exhaust pipe to smoke ?

A: You didn’t say what color the smoke is, which can provide an important clue to what’s wrong. Black or gray smoke often indicates a clogged air filter or too-rich jetting; you’d see a reduction in mileage and power. Blue smoke is usually caused by oil getting past the piston rings during acceleration or by the valve-guide seals on decel, eventually resulting in low oil level in the crankcase. White smoke means coolant is finding its way into the combustion chamber, which can cause overheating. A bad head gasket is probably the culprit.

To narrow down the problem do a leakdown test; you’ll need a special tool for this. Warm up the engine then put the piston at top dead center on the compression stroke so both valves are closed. Pump air into the cylinder through the spark-plug hole and measure the leakdown with the attached gauge. If the leakage is higher than normal according to the shop manual, listen for a hissing sound at the end of the exhaust pipe caused by a leaking exhaust valve; hissing inside the airbox means it’s an intake valve. Worn piston rings can be heard through the oil-filler hole in the engine or oil tank, and a bad head gasket sometimes bubbles the coolant. While you’re at it check the spark plugs to make sure the engine isn’t running so lean it’s overheating and damaging the rings or valves.

Got a question you want answered? Send it to mcmail@bonniercorp.com.

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More Women Are Getting Into Motorcycles .
More Women Are Getting Into MotorcyclesWhen you think of a woman on a motorcycle, you might imagine her on the passenger seat. But that demographic is quickly changing. A new report from USA Todayhighlighting female motorcycle enthusiasts points out that in 1998, just eight percent of motorcycle owners were women. That number has shot to an all-time high of 14 percent in 2014, the most recent year the data was available.

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