Motorcycles Erik Christensen's 1964 Harley-Davidson Panhead

23:45  06 september  2017
23:45  06 september  2017 Source:   Motorcyclist

The Story Behind the 1997 Harley-Davidson Heritage Springer Softail

  The Story Behind the 1997 Harley-Davidson Heritage Springer Softail In 1997 we looked into what inspired the '97 Harley-Davidson Heritage Springer Softail One of the HeritageSpringer Softail’s most prominent features is its “new” Springer front end, but the concept behind this chromed bit of eye candy is a half-century old. Looking much like the front suspension on the 1948 Panhead that inspired it, this modern Springer iteration has been around since 1988. Evolutionary refinements since then have kept this antiquated-but-viable system competitive with the telescopic forks in Harley-Davidson’s line. The Springer’s front-end function is immediately clear once you’ve had a chance to bounce on one and watch it work. The rearmost legs of the Springer are rigid and transmit cornering and braking loads into the motorcycle’s chassis through a conventional steering head. The bottom ends of these rigid rear legs (one on each side) have pivots that carry short swinging arms with the axle mounted at the front ends. To handle suspension loads, a second fork (positioned forward of the rigid one) mounts to the swing­arms via more pivots, and transfers suspension loads up to an array of springs and a single damper mounted in front of the steering head. The Springer design requires unique mounting for the front brake caliper and fender. The caliper carrier pivots on the wheel axle, and feeds its braking torque into the rear, rigid part of the fork with a short-reaction link.

1964 Harley - Davidson Panhead with rider Erik Christensen . Then, he handed me the note. On it was written: “ 1964 Harley Panhead Arlen Ness Chopper.”

1964 Harley - Davidson Panhead with rider Erik Christensen . Then, he handed me the note. On it was written: “ 1964 Harley Panhead Arlen Ness Chopper.”

1964 Harley-Davidson Panhead with rider Erik Christensen.© Michael Porterfield 1964 Harley-Davidson Panhead with rider Erik Christensen.

This Panhead Harley spent 30 years in a shed, but now gets ridden regularly.

I grew up around people who appreciate old stuff. My dad collected barber chairs and crank telephones. He bought an old hotel just to pull out valuable items so they didn’t get destroyed. Being around this stuff gave me an appreciation for old things. The stories that they tell stop me in my tracks.

I come from a multi-generational insurance-agent family, and I fought that job for as long as I could. I flew airplanes, collected skydives, and hurt myself BASE-jumping. I traveled—a year in Japan and six months in Australia. I was out in the world and not restricted to the island of Ketchikan, where I grew up.

The Story Behind the 1997 Harley-Davidson Heritage Springer Softail

  The Story Behind the 1997 Harley-Davidson Heritage Springer Softail In 1997 we looked into what inspired the '97 Harley-Davidson Heritage Springer Softail One of the HeritageSpringer Softail’s most prominent features is its “new” Springer front end, but the concept behind this chromed bit of eye candy is a half-century old. Looking much like the front suspension on the 1948 Panhead that inspired it, this modern Springer iteration has been around since 1988. Evolutionary refinements since then have kept this antiquated-but-viable system competitive with the telescopic forks in Harley-Davidson’s line. The Springer’s front-end function is immediately clear once you’ve had a chance to bounce on one and watch it work. The rearmost legs of the Springer are rigid and transmit cornering and braking loads into the motorcycle’s chassis through a conventional steering head. The bottom ends of these rigid rear legs (one on each side) have pivots that carry short swinging arms with the axle mounted at the front ends. To handle suspension loads, a second fork (positioned forward of the rigid one) mounts to the swing­arms via more pivots, and transfers suspension loads up to an array of springs and a single damper mounted in front of the steering head. The Springer design requires unique mounting for the front brake caliper and fender. The caliper carrier pivots on the wheel axle, and feeds its braking torque into the rear, rigid part of the fork with a short-reaction link.

This Panhead Harley spent 30 years in a shed, but now gets ridden regularly. 1964 Christensen ' s Erik HarleyDavidson Panhead 2017-08-17.

Search for a new Harley - Davidson motorcycle or check out past Harley - Davidson models. Erik Christensen ' s 1964 Harley - Davidson Panhead . This Panhead Harley spent 30 years in a shed, but now gets ridden regularly.

But that desire to find and restore items that shaped history was always in the back of my mind. Now that I have a career and a family, I’ve started to explore that appreciation in earnest, especially my fascination with motorcycles. I live 10 minutes from my office, so I figured a motorcycle would be a great commuter.

My first three builds made me realize how much I enjoy having my kids with me in the garage. Café racers displayed in my office became conversation pieces that led to more barn finds. I had to find a way for my family life, work life, and personal hobby to overlap. That’s how Alaska’s inaugural vintage motorcycle show was born.

In the days leading up to the show, my garage was transformed into a staging area. One of my neighbors walked over holding a sticky note.

Harley-Davidson is teaching an entire town how to ride

  Harley-Davidson is teaching an entire town how to ride It helps that the town has a population of about 85.On June 3, Harley-Davidson will show up in Ryder, North Dakota and offer every single resident the chance to learn how to ride a motorcycle. That might sound like an insurmountable task, but Ryder's population hovers around 85 people, so it shouldn't be too tough.

Harley - Davidson Hydra-Glide. In 1949, hydraulic fork tubes replaced the springer front end, nearly doubling the amount of wheel travel. Many thought it gave the Panhead a cleaner, more modern look.

After downloading the soft file of this 1964 harley davidson panhead manual, you can begin to read it. Yeah, this is so enjoyable while somebody should read by taking their big books; you are in your new way by only handle your gadget.

"The digger runs like a top now. It’s more reliable and leaks less than my British bikes. My heaven is 55 mph in third gear."

“I grew up with this guy,” he said. “He has MS and isn’t able to ride anymore.” Then, he handed me the note. On it was written: “1964 Harley Panhead Arlen Ness Chopper.”

In Alaska, anything worth saving is going to be in a shed or garage—someplace not exposed to the elements. If you meet the right people who help you uncover cool stuff, that stuff is probably going to be on the good side, great even, of whatever it is. And it’s going to have a unique story.

I drove out to look at the Panhead. The bike had been chopped in the late ’60s or early ’70s. It had a magneto, cloth-wrapped plug wires, lacquer paint, and a juice brake with a raked-out 12-over front end. It was period appropriate with a coffin tank—a time machine. I knew I had to have that bike.

You can imagine all of the issues that come with a bike that had been idle for 30 years. We started chipping away and slowly brought the Panhead back to life. With help from Ron Harvey at Harvey’s Custom Classics, we got it back on the road. The digger runs like a top now. It’s more reliable and leaks less than my British bikes. My heaven is 55 mph in third gear.

I’ve met some unique characters who have helped me uncover some cool stuff. With my kids now involved in restoring pieces from the past, I hope that they, too, grow up with an appreciation for old stuff. Only time will tell what they do with that appreciation and life lessons learned in the garage with dad.

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2018 Harley-Davidson Softail Cruisers Tech and Development .
An inside look at the biggest motorcycle development project in Harley-Davidson history. Softail and Dyna cruisers merger into a single platform.It’s not easy being The Motor Company. Having created the most successful motorcycle style in history, the company is rigidly held to that high standard by its customers. That makes change dangerous—something to be undertaken only after exhaustive study. Yet if you get the heritage part right, get the proportions, the colors, the unspoken but clear message right, you may earn the right to move ahead with change. Harley Earl, General Motor’s great styling chief, once said, “You must lead public taste. But not by too much.

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