News Demon's Tires Are Too Wide For Assembly Line

17:32  04 july  2017
17:32  04 july  2017 Source:   Road & Track

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According to Fiat Chrysler Automobiles spokesperson Kristin Starnes, the 315 millimeter- wide drag radial tires are too wide for the assembly line where the Demon is made alongside other Challengers, as well as the Dodge Charger and the Chrysler 300.

As it turns out, both the Hellcat Widebody and the Demon ' s tires are actually too big for the assembly plant where they're built. What's Up With This Charger Mule On Wide Tires ? Five-Millionth Audi A4 Leaves Assembly Line .

The Demon's Tires Are Too Wide For the Challenger's Assembly Line© Dodge The Demon's Tires Are Too Wide For the Challenger's Assembly Line

The eagle-eyed reporters over at Allpar recently spotted Dodge Demons and Widebody Hellcats wearing curious sets of blue wheels. They look totally undersized for these cars' massive flared wheel wells, so something was up. As it turns out, both the Hellcat Widebody and the Demon's tires are actually too big for the assembly plant where they're built.

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Originally, Dodge's Brampton, Ontario plant, where the Challenger is built, was only designed to accommodate tires no larger than 275mm wide. Until the Demon and the Widebody came into being, 275mm tires were the widest fit to a Challenger, but the new models use 315mm and 305mm width tires, respectively.

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As it turns out, both the Hellcat Widebody and the Demon ' s tires are actually too big for the assembly plant where they're built. What's Up With This Charger Mule On Wide Tires ? Five-Millionth Audi A4 Leaves Assembly Line .

Fiat-Chrysler Automobiles confirmed the tires are too wide for the Challenger’s production line , based in Brampton, Ontario, Canada. Without the drag radials, accolades such as the Demon ’ s 9.65 second quarter-mile time and 2.92-foot wheelie capability are squashed.

Dodge passenger cars boss Tim Kuniskis told Allpar that those wheels are actually blemished Hellcat wheels painted blue, so Dodge knows not to sell them to the public. The Hellcat Widebody and Demon will ride down the assembly line at Dodge's Brampton, Ontario plant wearing them, only to be taken to an upfitting center where their proper wheels and tires can be installed.

It was more cost-effective for Dodge to fit these cars with throw-away wheels than to re-tool the assembly plant, or risk damaging its new cars. It's actually a pretty ingenuous solution.

Some Demon and Hellcat Widebody owners want these wheels for their collections, but Dodge isn't offering them to the public. The automaker doesn't even have enough of these blue wheels for all the cars it plans to build - when the wheels are taken off, they get sent back to Dodge's plant to be installed on a new car.

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What’ s abnormal about the Demon he saw are its wheels, which are skinner than the 315mm drag radials that are supposed to come on the Demon . According to The Drive, Fiat Chrysler spokesperson Kristin Starnes claims that the drag radial tires are too wide for the assembly line .

The Challenger SRT Demon is fitted with exclusively developed 315/40R18 Nitto NT05R tires , the widest rubber toruses on a Speaking to The Drive, FCA spokesperson Kristin Starnes has divulged that the 315 mm- wide Nitto drag radials are too big for the Brampton Assembly Plant in Canada.

You have to imagine that some Demon and Hellcat Widebody owners will fit their cars with blue wheels, as a nod to this odd production quirk, but we don't recommend fitting undersized tires. The whole point of going Widebody is to get more tire under the wheel arches.

Truly, the Demon and Hellcat Widebody push the Challenger's boundaries.


Dodge Says Don't Drive the Demon Below 15 Degrees .
Those drag radial tires come with some serious weather limitations.Over at Jalopnik, Jason Torchinsky got his grubby, unsettling hands on the legal document that Fiat Chrysler will require every Demon buyer to sign before taking delivery of their street-legal drag racer. It's full of legal disclaimers seemingly aimed at protecting FCA from a lawsuit if a reckless Demon driver gets in trouble, with buyers asked to agree never to use the car's track-oriented features on public roads, or put passengers where seats have been deleted.

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