Ownership Here's Why You Shouldn't Use Winter Tires in the Summer

22:55  19 may  2017
22:55  19 may  2017 Source:   MSN

Winter/Snow vs. All-Season Tires: How They Compare

  Winter/Snow vs. All-Season Tires: How They Compare This time of year, many drivers debate whether or not it is worth investing in a dedicated set of winter/snow tires. With advances in all-season tires and mild winters in some areas, it is a fair decision to wrestle with. Before committing, do know that Consumer Reports tests consistently show that winter/snow tires deliver better grip to start in snow and stop on icy surfaces. They offer an extra margin of performance over all-season and all-terrain tires, and we have the data to prove it.

Why You Shouldn ' t Use Winter Tires Year-Round. Here are some specific reasons why using winter tires year round is not recommended. Faster wear on warm, dry pavement - the tread rubber of winter tires is considerably more flexible than that of all season and summer tires .

In a winter tire , the rubber compound is designed to stay soft at lower temperatures to increase grip on slippery surfaces, and it also features deeper treads and more extensive siping. Conversely, all-season and summer tires will stay firmer even at higher temperatures

  Here's Why You Shouldn't Use Winter Tires in the Summer © YouTube | Engineering Explained

If there's one underappreciated aspect to getting the most out your car's capabilities, it's having the right tires. Think about it-every other factor that we think of as determining the way a car drives and handles, from the engine to the transmission to the suspension, has to flow through four small patches of rubber. Without proper tires, all the precision engineering in the world won't make a difference in an emergency situation. So even though it can be a hassle to swap them out from season to season, the latest video from Engineering Explained shows exactly why it matters.

Americans spent over $15 billion in the last 5 years on damage caused by road salt and de-icers

  Americans spent over $15 billion in the last 5 years on damage caused by road salt and de-icers <p>The average cost to repair a vehicle damaged by de-icers is $490.</p>AAA provides some recommendations for how to prevent rust damage, or at least reduce it, and they all boil down to keeping de-icers off the car, the worst of which is apparently liquid de-icer. AAA says this is because liquid de-icers, which remain in liquid form even at low temperatures, can work into vehicle crevices that salt might not reach. To keep the nasty stuff off, make sure your vehicle is clean and waxed before winter. Wash it frequently through the winter, especially the underside, and do a thorough wash at the end of the season.

Learn. Why Shop for Wheels by First Selecting a Vehicle? Increased driver confidence and safety are the primary reasons buyers use winter tires .

In a winter tire , the rubber compound is designed to stay soft at lower temperatures to increase grip on slippery surfaces, and it also features deeper treads and more extensive siping. Conversely, all-season and summer tires will stay firmer even at higher temperatures

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In a winter tire, the rubber compound is designed to stay soft at lower temperatures to increase grip on slippery surfaces, and it also features deeper treads and more extensive siping. Conversely, all-season and summer tires will stay firmer even at higher temperatures, but they're specifically designed to perform well in warmer, drier conditions.

So what happens if you get lazy going into the spring and decide not to bother with changing out the winter set for the warmer months? Intuitively, you might think that a softer tire would always offer more grip than a firmer one, even if it might wear out sooner - but is that actually the case?

To find out, Jason Fenske decided to conduct a series of three 60-0 emergency braking tests in his 2016 Subaru Crosstrek on both winter tires (Bridgestone Blizzak WS80) and all-season tires (Yokohama Geolandar G95) on a dry spring day. Both sets were relatively new with under 5,000 miles on them, and both were tested at the same location under identical conditions. The results are pretty hard to dispute:

Dale Earnhardt Jr. says drivers will need 4 tires today

  Dale Earnhardt Jr. says drivers will need 4 tires today Dale Jr. took a few notes from Saturday's XFINITY race to give him an advantage today.For Earnhardt, who co-owns JR Motorsports with his sister Kelley Earnhardt Miller, it was as good a day as he could have possibly hoped for.

I have some nice new winter tires on my Caravan, and some "practically not legal to use " summer tires from last year. Is it ok to drive winter tires in the summer ? I have heard that you shouldn ' t drive them over 50 mph (100 kms.

The use of summer tires in winter carriers a lot of threat: difficult maneuverability, long stopping distances, etc. Why are winter tires safer in cold weather? Winter tires are special, soft, elastic-tread tires that aren’ t hard so they allow stabile ride.


On the first run, the winter tires were able to stop the Subaru in about 128 feet, while the all-seasons managed 124 feet. On the second run, however, the stopping distance on the Blizzaks jumped to 134 feet, while the Geolandar's second run was still around 124 feet. The third run for both was pretty similar to the second.

What's going on here? Fenske explains that the increased distance on the winter set can't be due to brake fade, as the ABS worked fine through all six runs and the better-performing all-season set was tested after the Blizzaks. His theory is that the rubber compound in winter tires is too soft for warmer conditions and basically sloughs off under heavy braking instead of holding together and providing as much grip as the all-seasons tires. Additionally, the more contoured surface on the Blizzaks allows for greater movement and deformation during an emergency stop, decreasing overall traction.

So if you've been putting off the seasonal changeover, just remember-those ten feet could be the difference between a close call and a collision.

This article was originally published on TheDrive.com

This Weirdo Tie-Dye Sponge Is Michelin's Dream Tire .
The Vision is an airless tire with a whole slew of other strange features.The tire would be made from bio-sourced and biodegradable materials, including natural rubber, paper, tin cans, wood electronic and plastic waste as well as a handful of other recyclable items to minimize its environmental impact. It would also be airless so you wouldn't have to worry about flats.

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