Health & Fit A popular sugar additive may have fueled the spread of 2 superbugs

02:50  04 january  2018
02:50  04 january  2018 Source:   Los Angeles Times

Warning: If You’re Diabetic and Over 75, Your Doctor Could Be Over-Treating You—Here’s How

  Warning: If You’re Diabetic and Over 75, Your Doctor Could Be Over-Treating You—Here’s How Although staying on top of treatment is vital for diabetics, there comes a time when it can be a hindrance. Everyone with a diagnosis should know the key facts about diabetes—here are the silent signs of diabetes you might be missing. Now, researchers from Duke University, the University of Michigan, and VA hospitals from North Carolina and Michigan say that over-treatment of elderly diabetics may actually put them in danger.As reported on EurekaAlert.org, a new study finds that taking too much medication can cause seniors to experience hypoglycemia. As blood sugar levels fall it can trigger dizziness and disorientation.

Two bacterial strains that have plagued hospitals around the country may have been at least partly fueled by a sugar additive in our food products, scientists The misuse and overuse of antibiotics has long been thought to be responsible for the rise of many kinds of antibiotic-resistant “ superbugs .”

'Healthy' sugar additive in cream cakes, nutrition bars and chewing gum has fueled the rise of a deadly superbug , study warns. Trehalose has become a popular sugar alternative for bakers as studies found it to be less calorific with less danger to the heart and liver.

a close up of a device: A widely used sugar additive called trehalose may have contributed to the emergence of two hyper-virulent strains of the bacterium Clostridium difficile, above. © Centers for Disease Control and/Los Angeles Times/TNS A widely used sugar additive called trehalose may have contributed to the emergence of two hyper-virulent strains of the bacterium Clostridium difficile, above. Two bacterial strains that have plagued hospitals around the country may have been at least partly fueled by a sugar additive in our food products, scientists say. Trehalose, a sugar that is added to a wide range of food products, could have allowed certain strains of Clostridium difficile to become far more virulent than they were before, a new study finds.

The results, described in the journal Nature, highlight the unintended consequences of introducing otherwise harmless additives to the food supply.

The unhealthiest drink at Starbucks will cost you nearly four days worth of sugar

  The unhealthiest drink at Starbucks will cost you nearly four days worth of sugar <p>Anyone who orders a Frappuccino knows that these syrupy concoctions are hardly the epitome of health. But there's one Frapp that's much worse than the others.</p>When most people order a Starbucks Frappuccino, they probably know that they're basically drinking a giant, coffee-flavored milkshake, and that these syrupy concoctions are hardly the epitome of health.

blog 'tylinbjerke.blogdetik.com' is not exists. Food Additive Users Handbook eBook.

blog 'anthonyrasberry.blogdetik.com' is not exists. To -Day in Ireland, the Carders, Connemara, Vol. 2 of 3 (Classic Reprint)

C. difficile is a nasty bacterium - infection can result in severe diarrhea and death - and numbers among the most prevalent hospital-acquired infections in the United States. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, nearly half a million people were sickened by the bug in 2011. Some 29,000 of those patients died within 30 days of being diagnosed with C. difficile, and about 15,000 of those deaths were directly linked to the infection.

The disease wasn't always such a scourge of the sick and hospitalized, and scientists have long been trying to figure out why certain strains have become so successful in recent years. The misuse and overuse of antibiotics has long been thought to be responsible for the rise of many kinds of antibiotic-resistant "superbugs."

What to Do After You've Eaten Too Much Sugar

  What to Do After You've Eaten Too Much Sugar <p>Our dietitian tells you how to combat your sugar hangover.</p>At Cooking Light, we think you should have treats in moderation (read: a fun-sized packet of Skittles or an occasional donut is totally fair game). But there’s something about Halloween that makes us want to binge eat anything with sugar and throw healthy eating completely out the window.

blog 'jamesrader.blogdetik.com' is not exists. ZOOM: The Global Race to Fuel the Car of the Future eBook.

Superbugs that medicine can't kill (3rd May , 2014). There are many horror movies about superbugs that spread around the world and kill millions of people. The World Health Organisation (WHO) has said the spread of deadly superbugs is now a reality.

To probe the mystery, a team of scientists led out of Baylor College of Medicine in Texas examined two particularly successful lineages of C. difficile, RT027 and RT078, examining what kind of carbon-rich molecules they ate. Both types, they noticed, seemed very good at using low concentrations of the sugar trehalose as a sole carbon source.

The researchers analyzed the genomes of both RT027 and RT078. While both had RNA sequences that allowed each type to take advantage of trehalose in low doses, they did so in very different ways.

C. difficile bacteria have genes that can break trehalose into glucose (a simpler, more useful sugar) and its derivatives. But a special protein called TreR blocks the microbes from metabolizing trehalose unless the concentration of trehalose in the environment is very high.

In RT027, the TreR protein is modified in a way that lowers the bar, allowing the bacteria to metabolize trehalose even in quite low concentrations.

Nutella Maker Secretly Changed the Spread’s Recipe in Europe So It’s More Sugary

  Nutella Maker Secretly Changed the Spread’s Recipe in Europe So It’s More Sugary New labels also show there’s 16 percent more powdered milk.In response to the post, Ferrero admitted that it did “fine-tune” Nutella’s recipe, explaining that the changes were just a couple of teeny-tiny “adjustments,” no big deal really, basically the kind of thing brands “regularly” do to their products. Routine or not, the tweaks ultimately affected not just Nutella’s milk-to-chocolate ratio, but also its sugar content, according to the Hamburg group: While sugar already accounts for the bulk of Nutella (55.9 percent), that amount has climbed further to 56.3 percent. One positive is maybe that total fat is down (from 31.8 percent before to 30.

Sorry, you do not have authorization to view this page.

RT078, however, is using a different mechanism to do the same thing, having picked up four genes that are used in taking up and metabolizing trehalose. (Just one of them, it turns out, was responsible for its powered-up ability to grow in small amounts of trehalose.)

"Unexpectedly, RT078 does not share the genetic alteration in TreR that is found in RT027," Jimmy D. Ballard of the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, who was not involved in the study, wrote in a commentary. Thus, "it therefore seems that two epidemic strains of C. difficile have optimized trehalose metabolism in unrelated ways."

The researchers tested their findings in mice. If they removed a gene for trehalose metabolism in RT027, then the strain became far less virulent. And if they added trehalose to the diets of animals affected with an unaltered RT027, the mice's risk of death shot up.

So, was the trehalose causing a bacterial population boom? Not really. The scientists found the RT027 bacterial load in the mice to be roughly the same regardless of whether they were fed this sugar. Instead, scientists think the microbes' improved ability to metabolize the sugar meant that they also produced more C. difficile toxins - making the bacteria far more virulent.

FDA approves diabetes drug that also helps with weight loss

  FDA approves diabetes drug that also helps with weight loss U.S. regulators on Tuesday approved a new diabetes drug that reduces blood sugar levels and also helps people lose significant weight. (Novo Nordisk via AP) TRENTON, N.J. — U.S. regulators on Tuesday approved a new diabetes drug that reduces blood sugar levels and also helps p Danish drugmaker Novo Nordisk said the Food and Drug Administration approved its once-a-week shot for people with Type 2 diabetes. The drug, Ozempic, also known as semaglutide, works by stimulating the body's own insulin production and reducing appetite.

blog 'brycefluth.blogdetik.com' is not exists. The young sugar makers of the West Woods epub pdf txt.

blog 'chrissharp.blogdetik.com' is not exists. Fuel Rights Handbook epub pdf txt.

The researchers also took fluids from the small intestines of three human study participants who were fed a typical diet and tried to grow different strains of C. difficile in it. Sure enough, RT027 responded to the trehalose in the bodily fluid, while other strains did not.

There's another reason scientists suspect trehalose is feeding the growth of these C. difficile superbugs: Both started making their big breaks roughly around the same time, researchers said.

"Although considered an ideal sugar for use in the food industry, the use of trehalose in the United States and Europe was limited before 2000 owing to the high cost of production (approximately U.S. $700 per kilogram)," the authors pointed out. "The innovation of a novel enzymatic method for low-cost production from starch made it commercially viable as a food supplement (approximately U.S. $3 per kilogram)."

For now, this evidence doesn't definitively prove whether trehalose helped fuel the C. difficile strains. But the findings are pretty telling and worthy of more study, Ballard said.

"Despite these concerns, the correlative findings of Collins and colleagues' study are compelling," he added. "It is impossible to know all the details of events surrounding the recent C. difficile epidemics, but the circumstantial and experimental evidence points to trehalose as an unexpected culprit."

Visit the Los Angeles Times at www.latimes.com

Study suggests that 'sugar coma' is a real thing .
And it leads to worse cognitive performance. © Provided by Gourmandize Study suggests that 'sugar coma' is a real thing Sugar Coma is a real thingGot a sweet tooth? You might want to reconsider your next square of chocolate.Scientists in New Zealand have published the results of a study that suggests that a spike in blood glucose levels is related to poor cognitive performance.This will come as no surprise to anybody who has ever experienced the lethargy and sleepiness of a 'sugar coma', the 'crash' that comes post-sugar binge.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

This is interesting!