Health & Fit 'Til death do us part? Science proves you really can die of a broken heart.

19:21  14 february  2018
19:21  14 february  2018 Source:   NBC News

Doctors Claim First Cannabis Overdose Death

  Doctors Claim First Cannabis Overdose Death No death from a marijuana overdose has ever been proven, according to the FDA. It’s a statistic commonly found on the lips of marijuana legalization advocates: No death from a pot overdose has ever been reported, according to the FDA.But now, doctors in Colorado think they may have uncovered the first-ever fatality from a marijuana overdose—in an 11-month-old baby. But their conclusions are controversial.In a case report titled Pediatric Death Due to Myocarditis After Exposure to Cannabis, Thomas M. Nappe and Christopher O.

Dying of a broken heart is more than a myth. The condition is being widely researched internationally, but it is generally accepted by the scientific community that stress hormones, such as adrenalin, are partly at fault.

Scientists showed that after a significant person's death , heart attack risks increased to 21 times higher than normal within the first day, and were almost six times higher than normal within the first week. A broken heart 'can kill'.

Image: A couple holds handsThe link between our hearts and minds is much more literal, and fragile, than we may ever have imagined. © Provided by NBCU News Group, a division of NBCUniversal Media LLC Image: A couple holds handsThe link between our hearts and minds is much more literal, and fragile, than we may ever have imagined. After one bad breakup, I felt as though I was experiencing a death. But I was lucky — my heartbreak wasn't literal.

Heartbreak can be a devastating experience at any age. When the man I thought was "the one" ended our relationship years ago, I felt as though I was experiencing a death. I could barely get out of bed, cried more often than not and moped around so miserably my friends grew weary of trying to distract me from my suffering. However, I was lucky — my heartbreak wasn't literal.

The science is in — why gluten sensitivity is probably fake

  The science is in — why gluten sensitivity is probably fake Unless you have Celiac Disease, your sensitivity to "gluten" probably has nothing to do with gluten at all. Your gluten sensitivity may not be caused by gluten. A recent study shows that the real culprit could be fructan. Fructan is a type of carbohydrate. You can find it in grains like wheat, rye, and barley. But it's also in gluten-free foods like agave, artichokes, asparagus, garlic, leeks, and onion.

And we never tire of hearing about them. Irene Jordan died a mere seven days after the death of her husband Bernard Jordan. It’s called ‘ broken heart syndrome’. provide evidence that proves something is true. run riot. behave in an uncontrolled way.

Science proves ' broken heart syndrome' is real . Bhusri believes it’s possible that broken heart syndrome caused the death of actress Debbie Reynolds, the mother of actress Carrie Fisher, who died the day after Fisher passed away in late 2016.

Unfortunately, in some people's cases, a breakup or other traumatic emotional stressor can be enough to cause physical damage to the heart, a syndrome known variously as takotsubo cardiomyopathy, stress-induced cardiomyopathy, or "broken heart syndrome."

The syndrome was first noticed in Japan in 1990, where physicians discovered that people were presenting with the symptoms of a heart attack during initial testing. However, follow-up cardiac angiograms that look for the signature blood clots of a heart attack turned up clean.

"Cardiomyopathy means a weakening of the heart muscle, of the heart's pump," Satjit Bhusri, a cardiologist with Lenox Hill Hospital in New York, told me. Takotsubo is the Japanese term for a kind of pot specially designed to catch octopuses, of all things. When the Japanese researchers who first identified the syndrome examined the hearts of early patients, they saw "the same type of appearance as the takotsubo bowl," Bhusri explained. "The apex or tip of the heart balloons out, and the base of the heart contracts normally."

Ralphie May's Cause of Death Has Been Revealed. Here's What Young People Need to Know

  Ralphie May's Cause of Death Has Been Revealed. Here's What Young People Need to Know <p>A cardiologist weighs in on the growing number of heart problems she sees in patients under 55.</p>Two months after comedian Ralphie May was found dead in a Las Vegas private residence, the cause of his death has been revealed. May, 45, died from hypertensive cardiovascular disease, Clark County Coroner’s office confirmed today to People.

Science . Some people are in therapy because they promised ‘ til death do us part ' — it is the sticking point in the healing of a broken marriage.

Broken heart syndrome is real , and it's killer. This one factor could make you more likely to die of a broken heart . These real -life stories are proof that “’ til death do us part ” doesn’t apply to everyone in love.

The condition got the nickname "broken heart syndrome," however, when researchers began to notice that often an emotional or mental stressor, such as a loss of a loved one or a divorce, had preceded the symptoms.

Bhusri believes it's possible that broken heart syndrome caused the death of actress Debbie Reynolds, the mother of actress Carrie Fisher, who died the day after Fisher passed away in late 2016. He also thinks it may explain why couples who have been together for long periods of time often die within days of each other.

In patients with broken heart syndrome, "the most common presenting symptoms are chest pain and shortness of breath," says Zachary Goldberger, associate professor of medicine and a cardiologist at University of Washington's School of Medicine. Patients also usually have an abnormal electrocardiogram, an abnormal echocardiogram and an elevated biomarker in their blood. Altogether, individuals with the syndrome present very much like they're having a heart attack.

Fruits and vegetables could save your life—but not from any one disease.

  Fruits and vegetables could save your life—but not from any one disease. <p>Eating plenty of fruits and veggies is probably the single most important piece of advice that most Americans ignore on a daily basis. As a country, we eat woefully little ruffage, and it is undoubtedly hurting our health. But any story that claims eating more [insert fruit or veggie here] will directly prevent you from getting [insert common and specific disease] is misleading you in a major way.</p>Eating plenty of fruits and veggies is probably the single most important piece of advice that most Americans ignore on a daily basis. As a country, we eat woefully little ruffage, and it is undoubtedly hurting our health.

Top 9 Must-try Sri Lankan fruits. Write for us . Home Lifestyle You really can die of a broken The answer is never going to be simple, so first we should start with a bit of science . Interestingly, where deaths were likely due to ill health, there was no increased risk of AF in the partners after the loss.

Tags: broken heart , can you die , medicine, science , syndrome, takotsubo. It really felt like we were two parts of one whole. I really wanted to die , but we did have the two children. It was obvious they expected me to stick around.

Only a cardiac angiogram will rule out an actual heart attack.

Even more fascinating, says Lenox Hill's Bhusri: "These patients have completely clean coronaries and their heart pumps resolve in anywhere from eight hours to two months."

While there is much researchers do not know about why and how this condition occurs, Bhusri says, is that these sort of attacks "are, more often than not, due to some type of stressor, either organic stress like a surgery, or an emotional stress." However, the stressors can include a startling array of potential causes, ranging from a fierce argument, to a natural disaster, financial loss or receiving bad news such as a cancer diagnosis.

The syndrome can even be the result of a panic attack, as happened to one of Bhusri's patients who collapsed at a big sale. "[it looked like a heart attack and it ended up being stress-induced cardiomyopathy."

In another case, Bhusri was the attending cardiologist in the ER when a patient had a heart attack and died. Suddenly, the patient's daughter also collapsed at her mother's bedside. "She had what looked like a heart attack and ending up having broken heart syndrome," Bhusri explains.

That Broken Heart May Never Recover, Study Shows

  That Broken Heart May Never Recover, Study Shows In most depressing news, a “broken heart” might actually cause long-term, irreversible implications on your health.&nbsp;“Broken Heart Syndrome” is usually regarded in a metaphorical sense, emotional trauma that can be conquered by time, a good therapist, a healthy dose of endorphins, or a pint of Ben and Jerry’s. As it may happen, a broken heart is just a figurative pseudonym for Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, a term coined in the early 1990s by Japanese researchers that refers to a weakening of the left ventricle, the heart’s main pumping chamber, in reaction to intense emotional stress.

Heartbreak in Heart 's Delight: Can you really die of a broken heart ? Atlantic Voice: Listen to the documentary Til Death Do Us Part . Sixty-three years earlier, Herbert and Ellen made a promise to be together, until death do they part .

But while we certainly feel “heartbreak” during periods of emotional upheaval, can you actually die of a broken heart ? The answer is never going to be simple, so first we should start with a bit of science . Fact or fiction: can we die from a broken heart ? Peaches Geldof death : sudden and unexplained.

While the condition can occur in men as well as in women, 90% of those who suffer it are women, aged 58 to 75. This may have to do with changes that occur post-menopause, but researchers don't have a conclusive answer for the stark gender divide.

Fortunately, Goldberger explains, the changes to the heart are "usually transient," and the outcomes "generally very favorable." But, he warns that "there can be severe consequences in some patients including sudden death," as well as arrhythmias and cardiogenic shock, which may damage the heart beyond a quick recovery.

Even though research still hasn't pinpointed the exact causes, the syndrome is now considered a legitimate diagnosis.

"There's a very significant brain-heart connection," Goldberger says. The heart has many receptors that take commands directly from the brain. While our understanding of the condition is still growing, the general hypothesis is that under stress or trauma, the sympathetic nervous system releases a lot of neurotransmitters that are very much like adrenaline, he explains. "These hormones may be cardiotoxic, and may injure the heart muscle."

Still, Bhusri says cardiologists have yet to fully understand how something like mental stress or a panic attack can result in "literally a broken heart." Even more curious, Bhusri says he's noticed what appears to be an increased prevalence of the condition. "I used to see it once a year but now I see it about every eight weeks," he said.

Perhaps this means doctors are more aware of the syndrome and so are looking for it more? Or perhaps life is simply becoming more stressful.

If anything, the syndrome reveals that the link between our hearts and minds is much more literal, and fragile, than we may ever have imagined.

Jordan Rosenfeld is the author of seven books. Her work has appeared in The Atlantic, DAME, Quartz, New York Magazine, Scientific American and many more. Follow her at @JordanRosenfeld.

The surprising reason some women don't get their hearts checked .
<p>Women have different symptoms of heart disease than men do, and those differences can make for deadly mistakes.</p>Women have different symptoms of heart disease than men do, and those differences can make for deadly mistakes, according to the American Heart Association.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

This is interesting!