Health & Fit This One Habit Could Help Prevent Dementia

22:17  17 may  2018
22:17  17 may  2018 Source:   purewow.com

Alzheimer's epidemic worsens in U.S.

  Alzheimer's epidemic worsens in U.S. Daughters, other relatives carry most of the responsibility Alzheimer's disease just keeps getting worse in the U.S. The latest report on the most common cause of dementia shows that 5.7 million Americans have the disease and it's costing us $277 billion a year.That doesn't include the unpaid time and effort of the people, mostly women, who are caring for spouses, parents, siblings, and friends with dementia, the annual report from the Alzheimer's Association shows."In 2017, 16 million Americans provided an estimated 18.

These new advances about how diet, exercise, and brain-boosting activities can help reduce the risk of dementia and Alzheimer's are exciting scientists. Prevent Alzheimer’s Disease: 8 Daily Habits a Neurologist Swears By.

New Survey: Science-Backed Habits Reduce Dementia Risk, But Many Americans Are Misinformed. It’s the sixth-leading cause of death in America, and the only one of the top 10 causes of death in America that can ’t be prevented , treated, or slowed down.

  This One Habit Could Help Prevent Dementia © vgajic/Getty Images

Wellness trends may come and go, but some things—like mindfulness and avocado toast—are forever. But if you’ve yet to try the meditation technique, scientists have discovered a very compelling reason why you should give this soothing self-care practice a go.

According to a new study published in BMJ Open, anxiety may increase the risk of developing cognitive conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease. But study authors suggest that meditative practices like mindfulness (which has been shown to help control anxiety) could potentially reduce this risk.

University College London (UCL) scientists analyzed research involving more than 30,000 people and found that those who suffered moderate to severe anxiety in midlife were more likely to develop dementia later on. And while the reason for this link is unclear, they think that it could be because the body's responses to stress may speed up brain cell aging.

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Sleeping in This One Position Could Help Prevent Alzheimer’s Disease, According to Science. These everyday habits can reduce your risk of Alzheimer’s disease, too. Conditions. 10 Treatable Causes of Dementia —and How to Recognize Them Before It’s Too Late.

Exercise also plays a dual role in helping to prevent the onset of dementias . Stress management is highly important, especially because it can relate to all the other positive habits that prevent mental decline.

But it’s not all bad news. The UCL team suggests that therapies that have been found to reduce anxiety, like mindfulness and meditation, could reduce the risk of later dementia (although they acknowledged that further research is needed).

“Non-pharmacological therapies, including talking therapies and mindfulness-based interventions and meditation practices, that are known to reduce anxiety in midlife, could have a risk-reducing effect, although this is yet to be thoroughly researched,” the team said.

Time to get your om on. (And then make yourself some avo toast, because why the heck not?)

Slideshow: 6 surprising things that are actually aging you (Courtesy: PureWow)

This Surprising Factor May Raise Your Risk of Alzheimer’s .
<p>In a study published in the journal Neurology, researchers led by Dr. Zoe Arvanitakis, medical director of the Rush Memory Clinic at Rush Alzheimer’s Disease Center, find more evidence that blood pressure may be one of those risk factors.</p>But in a study published in the journal Neurology, researchers led by Dr. Zoe Arvanitakis, medical director of the Rush Memory Clinic at Rush Alzheimer’s Disease Center, find more evidence that blood pressure may be one of those risk factors.

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