Health & Fit Why More Women Are Getting a Double Mastectomy

02:25  14 september  2017
02:25  14 september  2017 Source:   Time

National Breast Cancer Awareness Month: Key terms you should know

  National Breast Cancer Awareness Month: Key terms you should know “Mammogram.” “Triple-negative.” “Tumor stage.” Women may hear some -- or all -- of these words while speaking to their doctors about breast cancer. Understanding these terms and how they can affect you may be key to getting the help you need. Below are their definitions, as well some other common breast cancer-related terms and what they mean.Benign: When something is not cancer. BRCA-1 and BRCA-2: These two types of breast cancer susceptibility genes usually "help protect you from getting cancer," the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) explains.

“ Double mastectomy isn’t without risks, especially when you have reconstruction, too—which the majority of women choose to do. Most women who get CPM don’t regret their decision, but studies show that many wish they had known more about the trade-offs before embarking on the procedure

Why More Women Are Choosing to Have Double Mastectomies . She’s considering getting a 3-D tattoo in place of the missing nipple. Read more : Clothing that makes life easier for people with cancer ».

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(video by Wochit News) Recent research has shown that despite more having more treatment options, women with cancer in one breast are increasingly choosing to remove both breasts—even though experts in the field say the procedure is not necessarily accompanied by better outcomes.

National Breast Cancer Awareness Month: Key terms you should know

  National Breast Cancer Awareness Month: Key terms you should know “Mammogram.” “Triple-negative.” “Tumor stage.” Women may hear some -- or all -- of these words while speaking to their doctors about breast cancer. Understanding these terms and how they can affect you may be key to getting the help you need. Below are their definitions, as well some other common breast cancer-related terms and what they mean.Benign: When something is not cancer. BRCA-1 and BRCA-2: These two types of breast cancer susceptibility genes usually "help protect you from getting cancer," the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) explains.

Why a growing number of women with breast cancer are choosing double mastectomy . It’s difficult and disorienting to get a prognosis of breast cancer for most , but there are a range of choices available that don’t involve extreme decisions such as double mastectomy .

as to why women are making this choice, but these are only speculative, as the exact reasons for increased double mastectomy in the United States After a breast cancer diagnosis, there are many decisions to make. A multidisciplinary team of doctors and specialists can help get a treatment plan

Now, a new study published Wednesday in JAMA Surgery finds that the increase is being driven in part by their surgeons.

Doctors generally discourage contralateral prophylactic mastectomy—also known as CPM, or the removal of a healthy breast when the other has cancer—for women at an average risk for additional breast cancer. They do recommend it for women at a higher risk, like those with a BRCA gene, which greatly increases the risk of getting the disease. Even so, the rate at which women with cancer in one breast choose to remove both has increased nearly six fold from 1998 to 2011, largely among younger women with early-stage unilateral breast cancer and without genetic risk factors—in other words, women who are candidates for less aggressive treatment.

'Growing Pains' Star Joanna Kerns on Why a Double Mastectomy Was Her Only Option (Exclusive)

  'Growing Pains' Star Joanna Kerns on Why a Double Mastectomy Was Her Only Option (Exclusive) The 64-year-old actress stopped by 'The Doctors' to open up about her potentially life-saving procedure. For Joanna Kerns, there was no other option. The Growing Pains star is on Thursday's episode of The Doctors, where she opens up about her decision to undergo a double mastectomy in late 2016, after being diagnosed with breast cancer. Watch the video above for an exclusive interview preview."I did not want to be looking over my shoulder every six months," the 64-year-old actress explains, "wondering if this cancer was back.""Not an easy decision, but it was for me," she continues.

"These are women who haven't had cancer and want to look as close as they can to how they did before." Which is why the increasing numbers of celebrities apparently cruising so easily "One of the advantages of having a double mastectomy is that you get a much better result cosmetically.

New research suggests that women with early-stage breast cancer in one breast are more likely to have double mastectomies , with the likelihood of getting this procedure much greater in some states than others. And while it isn’t sure why more women are having both their breasts removed even if

Survival for these women isn’t higher than it is for women choosing less aggressive options like lumpectomy. Also called breast-conserving surgery, only a portion of the affected breast is removed. A March 2016 study of 4,000 women who had breast cancer surgery also found that removing both breasts did not markedly improve a woman’s quality of life in terms of breast satisfaction and their physical, psychosocial and sexual wellbeing.

“Unless a woman has a gene mutation that places her at significantly increased risk of a new cancer in the other breast, CPM doesn’t prolong life and our study shows that it doesn’t make for a notably better quality of life,” senior author Dr. Shelley Hwang, chief of breast surgery at the Duke Cancer Institute, said in a statement about the 2016 findings.

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'Growing Pains' Star Joanna Kerns on Why a Double Mastectomy Was Her Only Option (Exclusive)

  'Growing Pains' Star Joanna Kerns on Why a Double Mastectomy Was Her Only Option (Exclusive) The 64-year-old actress stopped by 'The Doctors' to open up about her potentially life-saving procedure. For Joanna Kerns, there was no other option. The Growing Pains star is on Thursday's episode of The Doctors, where she opens up about her decision to undergo a double mastectomy in late 2016, after being diagnosed with breast cancer. Watch the video above for an exclusive interview preview."I did not want to be looking over my shoulder every six months," the 64-year-old actress explains, "wondering if this cancer was back.""Not an easy decision, but it was for me," she continues.

Many American women with breast cancer undergo a mastectomy to remove the affected breast, but a growing number are opting to remove the noncancerous breast Mammograms, too, often result in false positives and have resulted in huge numbers of women getting treatments they don’t need.

If you had breast cancer in one breast, but not the other, would you choose to have both surgically removed? That a decision more women are making.

So why are women choosing the more aggressive option more often?

There are likely several reasons for what experts are calling a “surge” in women undergoing CPM—including a woman’s doctor. The new study found that a woman’s surgeon accounts for about 20% of the variation in rates of women removing both breasts.

In the study, researchers surveyed 5,080 women with early-stage breast cancer and an average risk for cancer in the other breast, along with 377 of their surgeons. They found that while the doctors largely agreed on what they would initially recommend—breast conserving surgery over CPM—there was variability in what was ultimately performed.

A woman had only a 4% chance of undergoing CPM if she went to a surgeon who was the most reluctant to perform the procedure and most favored breast-conserving surgery. But if a woman went to a surgeon who was classified by the researchers as most open to performing CPM—even if they may not have recommended it at first—and favored breast-conserving surgery the least, the likelihood of getting CPM was 34%.

Attention, Women! If You Want to Live Longer, Move to the Woods

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The number of women who have opted for double mastectomies (known As a result, more women are visiting their surgeons having already decided on a double “There’s a common misconception that having a double mastectomy is the way to go, and you’re going to get a better survival rate,” Brian “Everyone should have their own opinion, but they should be informed and know why they’re

That being said, many women are more likely to follow her example than their doctor’s advice. However, here are a couple of reasons why most women have no reason to start worrying about getting a BRCA genetic test, or even consider double mastectomy

Surgeons reported that the most common reason for offering CPM, despite their initial reluctance, was “to give patients peace of mind” and “avoid patient conflict”—not to reduce recurrence or improve survival.

“The emotional reactions to cancer frequently prime patients to desire the most aggressive approach,” says study author Dr. Steven J. Katz, a professor in the School of Public Health at the University of Michigan. “Our results underscore that most surgeons today favor less aggressive approaches to surgery, and it’s challenging for them to communicate with their patients that bigger is not better.”

Katz says that women are increasingly hearing about CPM through the experiences of family and friends. In prior work, he’s noted that a person’s fear about cancer recurrence or the desire to avoid regret down the line could lead to a decision between her and her doctor to undergo more aggressive surgery, even if the likelihood for improved survival or higher quality of life are uncertain.

In a corresponding editorial, Dr. Julie Margenthaler and Dr. Amy Cyr, both of the department of surgery at Washington University School of Medicine in St Louis, argue that doctors should counsel their patients about the different treatment options in a more standardized way. “We offer decision-making autonomy to patients, but, in creating that autonomy, we have resigned to overtreatment, motivated by the desire to avoid creating conflict in our relationship with the patient,” they write.

After 3 of My Family Members Died of Breast Cancer, I Got a Double Mastectomy at 25

  After 3 of My Family Members Died of Breast Cancer, I Got a Double Mastectomy at 25 <p>I feel lucky I was able to make this choice that they didn't get to.</p>Amazing news: The breast cancer death rate has declined by 38% since 1989. “Thanks to advances in detection and treatment, women aren’t just living longer; they’re requiring less-invasive surgeries and therapies,” says Therese Bevers, MD, medical director of the Cancer Prevention Center at MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston. Learn more about these breakthroughs, plus moves that reduce your risk.

In some cases, doctors may find it necessary to remove to remove a woman ’s breasts. In this interactive surgery, you will get familiar with different options for breast cancer treatment, and why a Double Mastectomy may be the chosen treatment.

7 Women Explain Why They Decided To Get Rid Of Their Boobs. […] of the most frustrating things I heard while recovering from my double mastectomy was hearing people tell me how toxic the environment is and how I didn’t need to have surgery […]

Katz says that since there is variability in what doctors ultimately agree to perform, women may want to consider visiting more than one doctor before deciding on a treatment plan. His own research shows that 95% of breast cancer patients are treated by the first physician they see. “If a patient is not totally in line with what’s being recommended, get a second opinion,” he says.

Physicians, too, could improve at helping women make a decision. “Let’s build consensus and try to decrease unwanted variability between one doctor and another,” says Katz.

This article was originally published on TIME.com

Gallery: 8 signs of breast cancer you might be ignoring (besides a lump) (Reader's Digest)Your nipples look scaly: <p>If the skin of your nipple is suddenly dry, flaky, and scaly-looking, and spreads outward toward the areola and breast, this may be a sign of breast cancer. 'A lot of people just have dry skin that goes away, but if you notice the scaling and it doesn't disappear, that's concerning,' says Sharon Rosenbaum Smith, MD, a breast surgeon at Mount Sinai West in New York City. These are other <a href=secrets your breasts wish they could tell you.

" src="/upload/images/real/2017/09/14/your-nipples-look-scaly-p-if-the-skin-of-your-nipple-is-suddenly-dry-flaky-and-scaly-looking-and-spr_234826_.jpg" /> 8 Signs of Breast Cancer You Might Be Ignoring (Besides a Lump)

Jill Goodacre’s Cancer Was Undetected on a Mammogram. Here's What Having Dense Breasts Means .
<p>The former Victoria’s Secret model was told she had dense breasts. What does it mean to have dense breasts — and can that raise your risk of cancer?</p>In the latest issue of People, Jill Goodacre, a former Victoria’s Secret model and the wife of recording artist and talk show host Harry Connick Jr., opened up about her breast cancer diagnosis five years ago this month.

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