Health & Fit Here’s Why Obesity Raises Breast Cancer Risk, According to Science

01:33  12 october  2017
01:33  12 october  2017 Source:   Reader's Digest

Adult colorectal cancer risk tied to weight as a teen

  Adult colorectal cancer risk tied to weight as a teen <p>Being overweight or obese as a teenager may increase a person’s risk of developing colorectal cancer as an adult, according to a large study.</p>Long-term follow-up of 1.79 million Israeli men and women examined for military service as teenagers showed that overweight and obese teens were over 50 percent more likely to develop colon or rectal cancer by middle age, compared to normal-weight peers.

Here ’ s Why Obesity Raises Breast Cancer Risk , According to Science . Woman Shares Her Rare Breast Cancer Symptom as a Warning to Others.

Here ’ s Why Obesity Raises Breast Cancer Risk , According to Science . Experts have long known that obesity , along with smoking, age, lack of activity and lifestyle can contribute to an increased risk of cancer , but a…

  Here’s Why Obesity Raises Breast Cancer Risk, According to Science © Suzanne Tucker/Shutterstock Experts have long known that obesity, along with smoking, age, lack of activity, and lifestyle can contribute to an increased risk of cancer, but a recent study is taking a closer look at how one of these conditions specifically relates to breast cancer. Based on their findings, The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center – Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC – James) are one step closer to understanding how obesity can influence or increase one’s risk for breast cancer.

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Their study is the first to provide evidence that obesity can alter the genes involved in our body’s inflammatory response, hereditary disorders, and other immunological diseases. The team, made of geneticists, cell biologists, medical oncologists, and epidemiologists looked at gene expression analysis of tissue samples collected from 121 women with no history of breast cancer. All women participating in the study were undergoing breast reduction and 51 participants were considered clinically obese.

Adult colorectal cancer risk tied to weight as a teen

  Adult colorectal cancer risk tied to weight as a teen <p>Being overweight or obese as a teenager may increase a person’s risk of developing colorectal cancer as an adult, according to a large study.</p>Long-term follow-up of 1.79 million Israeli men and women examined for military service as teenagers showed that overweight and obese teens were over 50 percent more likely to develop colon or rectal cancer by middle age, compared to normal-weight peers.

2014-10-14 - Heavy antibiotic use may raise colon cancer risk .

Obesity was not associated with breast cancer risk in Mexican-American women, even when measured at numerous ages throughout a woman' s lifetime, according to data presented at the Ninth Annual AACR Frontiers in Cancer Prevention Research Conference, held here Nov. 7-10, 2010.

For the study, the team closely examined the obesity and inflammation response, finding 308 genes important in the process. Of the 308 genes discovered, 240 were more likely to have sporadic mutations and low gene expression in obese women while 68 genes were shown to have a decreased risk for gene mutations and high gene expression. All of the participants’ affected genes were involved in diseases and disorders for inflammatory response, hereditary disorder and immunological disease.

“Different types of breast cancer could be affected differently by obesity, a more robust understanding of how obesity triggers inflammatory cancer pathways and increases breast cancer risk could help us develop better chemoprevention strategies or early prevention strategies in women at increased risk based on their weight,” said Peter Shields, MD, senior author of the AACR abstract and deputy director of the OSUCCC – James in a press release.

5 Common Breast Cancer Myths We Need To Stop Believing

  5 Common Breast Cancer Myths We Need To Stop Believing Cell phones, plastic water bottles, wearing a bra to bed, not wearing a bra, wearing a bra with underwire — all of these things, at one point or another, have been blamed on an increased risk for developing breast cancer.&nbsp;So, in honor of Breast Cancer Awareness Month (which starts next week), and to help young people better understand how they can protect themselves from breast cancer, breast cancer awareness charity ReThink has launched the #8008135 (aka, #boobies) campaign to bust pervasive myths.

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Science Explains Why Songs Get Stuck In Your Head. Although we know the big breast cancer risks , such as obesity and having a family history of the disease, many people aren't aware of other behaviors that seem safe, but could actually raise a woman’ s risk of developing this disease.

Along with watching your weight, there are additional ways women and men can decrease their chances of breast cancer, including taking a daily baby aspirin and cutting back on the amount of alcohol you drink. While researchers hope future studies can examine the genes identified by this study in participants that develop breast cancer later, here is what you need to know right now about the best ways to prevent breast cancer.

Birth control pills still raise breast cancer risk .
Taking hormone based contraception such as the birth control pill raises a woman's risk of breast cancer by 20 percent, a new Danish study shows. Even newer lower-dose birth control pills raise a woman's risk of breast cancer, although the actual danger is "quite small," researchers reported Wednesday.Hormone-infused devices such as vaginal rings, implants and some IUDs also appear to raise the risk, although again not by much, the study found.It's a disappointment to doctors who had hoped that lower doses of hormones in both oral and non-pill contraceptives might be safer than older birth control pills.

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