Health & Fit Is Legionnaires’ disease airborne? Here’s what we know about the illness that affected Disneyland

02:50  15 november  2017
02:50  15 november  2017 Source:   Hello Giggles

Connecticut man dies of tick-borne illness

  Connecticut man dies of tick-borne illness Avid gardener Michael Yoder was suffering from symptoms similar to a stomach bug for several weeks before his illness turned severe,<br>A man described as an avid gardener by his grieving relatives died earlier this month, after contracting a rare tick-borne illness at his Connecticut home. Michael Yoder, 55, was suffering from symptoms similar to a stomach bug for several weeks before his illness turned severe, the Danbury News Times reported.

Here ' s what we know about the illness that affected Disneyland . Erin Mayer. However, if you haven’t heard of the disease before, you might still have questions. For example: “ Is Legionnaires ’ disease airborne ?”

Not only did Legionnaires ’ prove fatal to many affected by its first notable outbreak, but those victims didn’t even know what was making them sick. They had spent time all over the city, eaten in restaurants and traveled home in a variety of ways. In a cover story that August about the “ disease

a girl taking a selfie: Is Legionnaires’ disease airborne? Here’s what we know about the illness that affected Disneyland © Oli Scarff/Getty Images Is Legionnaires’ disease airborne? Here’s what we know about the illness that affected Disneyland

You’ve probably seen “Legionnaires’ disease” popping up in the news this week, due to a recent rash of the illness at Disneyland in Anaheim, CA. If you have a trip planned to The Happiest Place on Earth coming up, you’re probably frantically googling the symptoms.

The good news? Your travel plans are probably safe. Disneyland addressed the problem and swiftly stopped operating the two cooling towers likely responsible for the outbreak. However, if you haven’t heard of the disease before, you might still have questions. For example: “Is Legionnaires’ disease airborne?”

Connecticut man dies of tick-borne illness

  Connecticut man dies of tick-borne illness Avid gardener Michael Yoder was suffering from symptoms similar to a stomach bug for several weeks before his illness turned severe,<br>A man described as an avid gardener by his grieving relatives died earlier this month, after contracting a rare tick-borne illness at his Connecticut home. Michael Yoder, 55, was suffering from symptoms similar to a stomach bug for several weeks before his illness turned severe, the Danbury News Times reported.

Here ' s a look at what you need to know about Legionnaires ' disease 2. How does Legionnaires ' disease spread? Legionella bacteria are commonly spread through airborne water droplets. The illness can happen any time of year but is most common during the summer and early fall.

Here ' s a look at what you need to know about Legionnaires ' disease 2. How does Legionnaires ' disease spread? Legionella bacteria are commonly spread through airborne water droplets. The illness can happen any time of year but is most common during the summer and early fall.

Per the CDC, Legionella, the bacteria that causes the disease, is “found naturally in freshwater environments, like lakes and streams,” but is dangerous to humans “when it grows and spreads in human-made water systems.” The CDC lists showers, fountains, stagnant hot tubs, and cooling towers as possible breeding grounds.

People who breathe in tiny drops of the infected water are at risk for contracting Legionnaires. In short, the disease is airborne. Yet, the CDC also states that it’s not highly contagious among humans.

According to Mayo Clinic, Legionnaires’ is a type of pneumonia. While not everyone falls ill from contact with Legionella, the condition can be severe for people with already compromised immune systems. Mayo Clinic also reports that symptoms usually appear in as little as two, or as many as ten, days.

NYC man dies of Legionnaires' disease, 1 other sickened

  NYC man dies of Legionnaires' disease, 1 other sickened A Queens resident is dead and another was sickened after they both contracted Legionnaires’ disease within a two-month period, prompting New York City health officials to investigate their apartment building’s plumbing. The other residents of Park Towers, located on Queens Boulevard in Forest Hills, have been notified of the ongoing investigation.“The Health Department is working with the building management to test the building’s hot water plumbing system,” a New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene spokesman said, according to NBC New York. “The building does not have a cooling tower.

What Is Legionnaire ' s Disease ? In 1976 more than 200 people attending an American Legion convention at the Bellevue-Stratford Hotel in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, suddenly came down with a mysterious illness An electron micrograph of the bacteria Legionella pneumophila is shown here .

What is Legionnaires ’ disease , and why the name? It wasn’t until after the outbreak, however, that health officials discovered Legionella bacteria’ s existence in the affected people’ s lung tissue.

Ultimately, thanks to their swift response, chances are you’re good to hit up Disneyland in the near future without risk of infection.

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Minnesota county scrambles to control deadly tuberculosis outbreak .
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