Home & Garden The Dos and Don'ts of Watering Plants

20:22  08 september  2017
20:22  08 september  2017 Source:   bobvila.com

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The article below from Reimer Seeds explains the dos and don ’ ts of growing hot peppers from seeds. After the seedlings reach 2″ tall, water the plants once a week with half concentration of liquid plant fertilizer.

No matter what color your thumb, you likely already know that all plants need water to reach their full potential—aft… The Dos and Don ' ts of Watering Plants posted first on findqueenslandelectricians.blogspot.com. ∞ Permalink.

Top Tips for Watering Plants© Provided by Bob Vila Top Tips for Watering Plants Photo: istockphoto.com

No matter what color your thumb, you likely already know that all plants need water to reach their full potential—after all, that basic knowledge goes back to basic middle-school science class. But what you might not know is that incorrect watering techniques can put plants at risk for disease and even kill them. Whether you want to cultivate pretty outdoor perennials or you just bought a new houseplant, heed these best and worst practices for watering plants indoors and out and you'll reap healthy, happy specimens.

WATERING OUTDOOR PLANTS

DO hydrate plants in the morning.

The most efficient time to water outdoor flowers and vegetables is before the heat of the day when the soil is cool and the water has the best chance of seeping down to the roots of the plants before evaporating. Watering plants early will ensure that they have sufficient store of moisture beneath the soil to withstand the heat of a hot summer day.

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You should also consider climate conditions and any other concerns before digging in and planting new flowers or shrubs. Here are the main dos and don ' ts of backyard What kind of timeframe do you have to water and nurture plants ? Are you a stay at-home mom with a lot of other responsibilities?

Plants add soothing green color to a room, but for those without a green thumb plastic plants are a better choice. Perhaps you forget to water real plants . Even a slightly askew basket will draw away from the beauty of these plastic plants , so don ’t just plop them in any old container.

DON'T water too frequently or too little.

Especially during hot weather, it may be tempting to water just enough—and often enough—to keep the soil damp. Shallow surface watering, however, discourages deep root development. Instead, opt for a less frequent watering routine that thoroughly saturates the soil. This method encourages the roots to reach deeply for residual water, even when the surface of the soil appears dry. The standard rule of thumb is to give your flowers and vegetables the equivalent of at 1 inch of water per week (and as much as double that amount in the peak of summer).

DO water plants at soil level.

Directing water at the base of your plants delivers the hydration right where it’s needed: the roots. Consider winding a soaker hose between plants in a flower or vegetable bed to soak the soil slowly and deeply and ensure healthy growth.

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Top Tips for Watering Plants© Provided by Bob Vila Top Tips for Watering Plants Photo: istockphoto.com

DON'T use broadcast sprinklers.

In addition to soaking the plant’s leaves, which can increase the risk of a fungal disease, broadcast sprinklers are simply inefficient. On a hot or windy day, much of the water distributed by this type of sprinkler can evaporate before it even reaches the plant and less water goes to the base of the plant.

DO water outdoor container plants at least once per day.

Soil in container gardens and flowerpots dries out more quickly than soil in a garden plot or flower bed. The smaller the container, the more frequently you need to water. Soak the soil in containers in the morning, and, if the mercury in the thermometer climbs to 90 or above, give them another soaking in the afternoon.

DON'T forget that trees need water, too.

Newly planted trees and shrubs should be thoroughly soaked with water two or three times per week for the first month. After that period, water weekly during their first growing season. Established trees and shrubs (which are at least two years old) only need to be watered once every two weeks during the growing season when rain is scarce.

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  How To Defend Your Garden From Diseases That Will Ruin Your Soil The top 10 inches of your garden's soil, where your plants' roots feed and grow, is teeming with bacteria, fungi, and countless other microscopic creatures. Most are beneficial or even essential to keeping your plants healthy. But some are pathogens that attack plants' roots, inhibiting their uptake of water and nutrients and disfiguring or killing your plants. You see the results as, for instance, tomato vines that are wilted even after watering, tumor-like swelling on roses, and rotting spots on cucumbers.Good news: The way to avoid diseases caused by soil pathogens is nothing more or less than smart organic soil care.

Follow these Simple Dos and Don ’ ts for Growing Great Tomatoes. Tomato plants love water and they like a deep watering . A soaker hose works best for tomato plants . (affiliate link) Also see my tutorial for a soda bottle drip feeder here.

Here’s a list of dos and don ' ts to help your plants survive hard freezes and to help you enjoy the blooms on the many beautiful During dry periods when the ground isn’t frozen or covered with snow, a once-a-week deep watering is beneficial. New plantings especially need to be watered in.

DO use a wand to water container plants.

A watering wand extends the reach of your arm, allowing you to direct water at soil level in overhead hanging plants and in short, ground-level flowerpots on the ground without having to stretch or stoop. You’ll conserve water by directing only the amount needed to the base of the plant and you’ll save your back.

DON'T water container plants with a jet-type spray nozzle.

Pressurized nozzles are great for washing off driveways and sidewalks, but the spray that they deliver can damage tender foliage and blossoms. It can also disturb the soil around the roots of a container plant. If you don’t have a watering wand, just remove the nozzle from the garden hose, hook the hose into the hanging pot or container, and let the water run out slowly.

Top Tips for Watering Plants© Provided by Bob Vila Top Tips for Watering Plants Photo: istockphoto.com

WATERING INDOOR PLANTS

DO use a watering can for houseplants.

Trying to water a leafy houseplant from a drinking glass or carafe is just asking for water to spill out over the rim and onto your table or windowsill. Not only does a watering can's long spout eliminate spills, but it also allows you to precisely direct water right at the base of the plant even if you’re watering plants that hang overhead.

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Reasons to Nix Man-made Mulches: • The researchers do not recommend landscape plastics because they don 't just hurt the weeds; they can also hurt your plants and soil by causing nutrient stress and restricting root growth, water , and air. Martin also points out that there are few places to recycle these

Make sure you water enough so that the water drains from the holes in the pot in which the orchid is planted . In nature most orchids grow in tree bark rather than soil. With these dos and don ' ts , growing a single orchid plant or even a roomful should be easy.

RELATED: 10 Best Plants for Fall (Provided by: Southern Living)

'October Glory': <p>What’s the most dependable tree in the South for spectacular red fall foliage? ‘October Glory’ red maple (Acer rubrum ‘October Glory’). It grows 50 to 60 feet tall, and you can get it at most garden centers. September is a great time to plant.</p> 10 Best Plants for Fall

DON'T water houseplants with treated softened water.

Home water softeners impart sodium into your tap water, which, over time, can negatively affect the mineral makeup of a houseplant’s soil. Depending on your plumbing, your water softener may connect only to the hot water faucets or to all the faucets in your home, both hot and cold. If it's the latter (or you aren't sure), stick to filling your watering can at an outdoor spigot to minimize the amount of sodium you introduce to the soil.

DO check a soil moisture gauge.

An inexpensive soil moisture gauge costs less than $20 and you can insert it directly into the soil to find out whether it’s dry, moist, or wet as many as several inches deep by the roots. Large houseplants in small pots absorb water more quickly than small plants in large pots. When you use a moisture gauge, as opposed to following a watering schedule, your plants will get the water they need, when they need it.

Top Tips for Watering Plants© Provided by Bob Vila Top Tips for Watering Plants Photo: istockphoto.com

DON'T put houseplants in pots without drainage holes.

Most houseplants need well-drained soil in order to grow and thrive. If water cannot drain out through the bottom of the pot, the roots are subject to sitting in water and potentially rotting. Check the bottom of each potted houseplant and repot any without drainage holes into a more appropriate container with them.

How To: Protect Plants from Frost

  How To: Protect Plants from Frost Unexpected early fall and late spring frosts—periods when outside temperatures go below freezing (32 degrees Fahrenheit)—often catch home gardeners off-guard, nipping tender fruit buds, cutting short vegetable harvests, and killing houseplants that were left outdoors.&nbsp;Unexpected early fall and late spring frosts—periods when outside temperatures go below freezing (32 degrees Fahrenheit)—often catch home gardeners off-guard, nipping tender fruit buds, cutting short vegetable harvests, and killing houseplants that were left outdoors.

No matter what color your thumb, you likely already know that all plants need water to reach their full potential—aft

However, there are some dos and don ’ ts when it comes to watering your trees. Do: Water deeply rather than frequently. Newly planted trees need to be watered thoroughly immediately after planting .

DO water less in winter and more in spring.

During the winter, the days are shorter and indoor houseplants receive less ambient light through windows. As a result, photosynthesis (the process in which a plant turns light into food) slows and the plant enters a resting phase, during which it needs less water. As spring approaches, however, longer days signal the plant to start growing, and at this time, its water needs increase. Adjust your habits for watering plants accordingly so as not to cause distress or thirst.

DON'T forget to dump the water collection tray.

When watering, excess H2O will drain into the collection tray beneath your houseplant almost immediately, but don't pour it right away—the plant may reabsorb some of it within the next 30 minutes. After that, go ahead and dump. Allowing a plant to sit in standing water increases the risk of root rot, a potentially deadly development for the plant.

DON'T overwater.

Overwatering is one of the main causes of houseplant failure. Houseplant newbies have a tendency to water houseplants too often, thinking that’s just what they need. Overwatering, however, increases the risk of root rot and fungal disease. If you see droopy stems, wilting leaves, a whitish coating (fungus), or fungal gnats in the home—pests that thrive on consistently wet soil—it’s a good bet that you’re watering plants too much.

On the other hand, when the bottom leaves on your houseplant dry out and drop and edges of the leaves elsewhere on the plant become crisp and brown, it’s probably not getting enough water. Again, refer to the soil moisture gauge for that happy medium.

Researchers Link Some Plants Used in Traditional Herbal Medicine to Liver Cancer

  Researchers Link Some Plants Used in Traditional Herbal Medicine to Liver Cancer <p>Researchers in Singapore and Taiwan have linked plants containing aristolochic acids, which are often found in weight-loss herbal medicines, to liver cancers.</p>In the study, published online last week in the medical journal Science Translational Medicine, a team of scientists examined 98 liver tumors from Taiwan and found that 78 percent showed signs indicating exposure to "aristolochic acids" (AA), a carcinogenic compound found in plants used in some traditional medicines. The compounds have also been linked to urinary tract cancers and kidney failures.

by Best 2 Buy · September 7, 2017. No matter what color your thumb, you likely already know that all plants need water to reach their full potential—aft… …read more. Read more here:: Bob Vila.

Watering Tools – Water is one of the primary needs of plants and you would need to water the plants a few times during the week to keep it hydrated. Be the first to comment on " The Dos and Don ’ ts of Indoor Gardening". Leave a comment Cancel reply.

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With fair weather having arrived finally, it's time to turn your home improvement efforts to the backyard and your deck, porch, or patio—the parts of the home built specifically to enjoy the extra hours of sunlight. Guided by these practical pointers and inspiring ideas, you can introduce beauty, comfort, and utility to your backyard and outdoor living areas, making them as inviting and enjoyable as your home interiors.
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