Smart Living Science Has Just Discovered the Secret to Learning a New Language

21:06  12 may  2017
21:06  12 may  2017 Source:   rd.com

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michaeljung/ShutterstockWhen it comes to learning a new language , the old saying “practice makes perfect,” actually has some merit. I’m a Telemarketer—Here’s How To Get Rid of Me. You can't just screen my calls using caller ID. How can you make me go away for good?

When it comes to learning a new language , the old saying “practice makes perfect,” actually has some merit. A new study that focused on how language is acquired in the brain, found that repetition is an important part of the language learning process.

  Science Has Just Discovered the Secret to Learning a New Language © michaeljung/Shutterstock

When it comes to learning a new language, the old saying “practice makes perfect,” actually has some merit. A new study that focused on how language is acquired in the brain, found that repetition is an important part of the language learning process. (Learning Spanish? These are the Spanish words everyone should know.)

The study done by Lilli Kimppa from the University of Helsinki looked at the ways our brains respond to new words over short periods of exposure, Science Daily explains. For her research, Kimppa worked with Finnish-speaking volunteers, measuring their neural response with electroencephalography (EEG) during spoken tasks that included repeated words in their native Finnish language and non-native language. Words were presented for no more than 30 minutes in two conditions: “participants were either passively exposed to the spoken words in the background, or they attended to the speech. Similar neural enhancement to novel words was observed in both listening conditions.” At the study’s conclusion, it was found that exposure to quick, repeated novel words showed a response in the brain that suggests one had memorized the language.

The Secret Ingredient for Fluffier Pancakes and Waffles

  The Secret Ingredient for Fluffier Pancakes and Waffles It’s a glorious Saturday morning. With no work to do, you lounge around in your PJs before moseying into the kitchen to prep a piping hot latte (in this scenario, you have a coffee-shop-quality espresso machine) and a breakfast that you don’t have to eat in transit while answering emails. You decide on pancakes. You whip up a batch, chow down while gazing out the window at a perfect day and smile at having achieved nirvana. The only way this dream morning could get better? If your pancakes were fluffier. Lucky for you, this is an easy fix. All you have to do is swap out the water in your go-to recipe with—wait for it—seltzer. We learned this secret from a friend’s ex-boyfriend’s mom, but apparently the science behind it is that when the batter heats up and cooks, the air bubbles in the seltzer expand, causing the pancakes to puff up to new heights. (FYI, this also works for waffles.) Consider your Saturday morning forever changed.

michaeljung/Shutterstock When it comes to learning a new language , the old saying “practice makes best,” actually has some merit. A new research study that focused on how language is obtained in the brain, found that repeating is a fundamental part of the language discovering procedure.

A new study that focused on how language is acquired in the brain, found that repetition is an important part of the language learning process. If you teach your child these three languages , you’ll be raising a future CEO. Originally published as Science Has Just Discovered the Secret to

“Unlike the response to existing words, new words showed a neural response enhancement between the early and late stages of exposure on the left frontal and temporal cortices, which was interpreted as the build-up of neural memory circuits,” Kimppa said. “The magnitude of this neural enhancement also correlated with how well the participants remembered the new words afterwards.”

Through her study she was able to explore how volunteers’ previous language backgrounds would affect their word memory-trace formation, which is the process of how we’re able to memorize. The study revealed that there was a great response to new non-native words in volunteers with previous foreign language experience. This signals an increased “flexibility of the brain to acquire the speech with novel phonology.”

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The Secret Cultural Code behind Everyday English Words and Phrases. There are countless English words that have no exact counterparts in Hungarian, nor, as far as I know, in other European languages . Language learning is all about discovering the beauty of another culture.

Learning from the Good Language Learner . I hope you can now see how learning a new language isn’t so mystical. There’s no sorcery or witchcraft involved, but there is a secret formula. And now you have it, too!

So what does this research mean for children learning new vocabulary words? Along with her study on adult volunteers, Kimppa also looked at “rapid neural word learning” in children ages 9 to 12 with dyslexia and normal reading abilities. Children who could read normally showed a faster response to a novel word within six minutes of passive perceptual exposure, but children with dyslexia demonstrated no neural change throughout the 11-minute test.

“This suggests deficient rapid word learning abilities of the brain in dyslexia compared to non-affected peers. Dyslexics possibly need even more repetition or different kinds of learning strategies to show the neural effect,” Kimppa said. Find out additional ways to quickly and easily learn a new language.

Prevention: 10 rules for a younger, smarter you

Rule #1: Add spices to every meal: <p>One of the greatest brain defenses is the addition of spices to your meals. Spices function like little brain medications. They are nutrient dense: Each can provide between 20 and 80 different nutrients. By using them often, you are benefiting by getting more important vitamins, minerals, and even antioxidants. They allow your foods to be better metabolized, because calories are burned more easily when they are accompanied by nutrients.</p><p>The following spices are known to have specific medicinal properties that improve cognitive performance, decrease inflammation of the brain, or reduce anxiety: allspice, anise, basil, black pepper, cayenne pepper (chile pepper), clove, coriander, cumin, dill, fennel, garlic, ginger, lemon balm, lemongrass, marjoram, mustard seed, nutmeg, peppermint, rosemary, saffron, sage, sesame seeds, spearmint, and <a href=turmeric.

How to do it: Incorporate regular herbs and spices into your daily cooking to gain the immediate health benefits.

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