Smart Living Why America Still Hasn’t Switched From Fahrenheit to Celsius

00:20  14 september  2017
00:20  14 september  2017 Source:   Mental Floss

Postcard Reaches Its French Destination 43 Years After It Was Sent

  Postcard Reaches Its French Destination 43 Years After It Was Sent Unfortunately, the recipient has since moved.Sent from Nice in France in 1974, the postcard finally made its way to Lorient, Brittany last month. That's just over 800 miles, or about the distance between New York and Savannah, Georgia. According to local French news outlet Ouest France, the postcard read, "Dear Raymond, After several traffic jams, we have finally joined Marie-Louise and Raymond, who we came to have lunch with at their house. We’re leaving Nice tomorrow to go to Menton for a week.

In its new video, Vox explains why the U.S. is still measuring degrees in Fahrenheit long after the rest of the world decided to make the switch to metric. To learn about the history of Fahrenheit and Celsius , and to see how the imperial system is more than just a nuisance for people visiting the U.S

Fahrenheit became a standard temperature in much of the globe. Why America still uses it. The UK itself began metrication, the process of switching all measurements to the metric system, in 1965. America , it's time to adopt Celsius — and the rest of the metric system.

If you grew up in America, you know that when the thermometer reads 32° F it’s time to bundle up, and if it’s 85° F outside you should break out a t-shirt. But say these temperatures to someone living in a different part of the world and you’ll likely be met with confusion. That’s because the United States joins Myanmar and Liberia as one of only three nations that don’t recognize the metric system.

In its new video, Vox explains why the U.S. is still measuring degrees in Fahrenheit long after the rest of the world decided to make the switch to metric. It wasn’t for the government’s lack of trying: In 1975, the country passed the Metric Conversion Act with the intention of selling the system to Americans. But while Canada, the UK, and Australia made adopting metric measurements mandatory, there was no such enforcement in the U.S. So, given the option to stick with what they know or teach themselves a whole new system, U.S. citizens chose the former.

Human frontiers: How much heat can the body and mind take?

  Human frontiers: How much heat can the body and mind take? <p>Researchers fear governments and the public are ill-prepared to deal with rising temperatures because of a general lack of awareness about how heat can impact people's health.</p>By Zoe Tabary

Here's why it never worked out. For people that find it easier to actually calculate the conversion from Fahrenheit to Celsius , there is a relatively simple formula.

In its new video, Vox explains why the U.S. is still measuring degrees in Fahrenheit long after the rest of the world decided to make the switch to metric. To learn about the history of Fahrenheit and Celsius , and to see how the imperial system is more than just a nuisance for people visiting the U.S

To learn about the history of Fahrenheit and Celsius, and to see how the imperial system is more than just a nuisance for people visiting the U.S., check out Vox’s full report below. Why America Still Hasn’t Switched From Fahrenheit to Celsius© iStock Why America Still Hasn’t Switched From Fahrenheit to Celsius

[h/t Vox]

This Is the Best Way to Cook Chicken Breasts, According to a MasterChef Champ .
I usually just grab whichever meats are most affordable for the sake of giving my wallet a break, without really thinking twice about the quality (or lack thereof). But after a year of penny-pinching, I may officially be changing my ways to splurge a bit more on my most common expense: chicken. So what's the source of said sudden change of heart (and budget allocation)? While recently browsing the internet, I came across the fact that chef Gary Maclean, a winner of MasterChef's UK series, did a Reddit AMA, and I couldn't resist diving in to hear his juicy tidbits about the show and all things food-related.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

This is interesting!