Travel Airline crews restraining more unruly, drunk passengers

00:25  08 december  2017
00:25  08 december  2017 Source:   USA TODAY SPORTS

Flight Cheers as Passenger Subdues Drunk Flier

  Flight Cheers as Passenger Subdues Drunk Flier The dramatic incident aboard a Ryanair flight was captured on video.In a brief video posted to YouTube, an older man can be seen rendering a rowdy passenger unconscious after putting him in a chokehold.

Airline crews are being forced to restrain more unruly , drunk passengers . Drunk , drugged, abusive and out-of-control passengers are causing more serious headaches for airlines and for their fellow travelers.

Unruly passenger behavior continues to be one of the biggest issues facing airlines and the severity of the problem continues to increase. Two more incidents involve alcohol. On a European flight, a woman who had had only two drinks went berserk and began attacking crew members around her.

A Lufthansa Airbus A340-600 takes off from Los Angeles International Airport in March 2017. © Jeremy Dwyer-Lindgren, special for USA TODAY A Lufthansa Airbus A340-600 takes off from Los Angeles International Airport in March 2017.

GENEVA, Switzerland -- Drunk passengers urinating on others. Passengers fighting with each other. And some trying to open the emergency exit door during a flight. 

Drunk, drugged, abusive and out-of-control passengers are causing more serious headaches for airlines and for their fellow travelers.

While overall reports of unruly passenger incidents dipped slightly during 2016, airlines worldwide reported an increase in the number of on-board incidents that involved physically abusive or obscene behavior by passengers. There's also been an uptick in the number of passengers that ended up being restrained.  

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  Ryanair cancels about 2,000 flights over six weeks Ryanair announced Friday it was cancelling between 1,680 and 2,100 flights over the next six weeks in a bid to "improve punctuality", sparking outrage from passengers who suddenly have to make new travel plans. The Irish low-cost airline said it would scrap 40 to 50 flights daily -- "less than two percent" of its flying programme -- to address problems caused by air traffic control (ATC) delays and strikes, weather disruption and a change in the holiday schedules of pilots and cabin crews.

The airline has announced that it will introduce a new policy allowing the crew to readily use stun guns against unruly and potentially violent passengers Marx on a flight from Hanoi, Vietnam to Incheon, South Korea helped subdue a passenger who got drunk from taking more shots of whiskey than he

Airline crews restraining more unruly , drunk passengers .

Last year, airlines reported 9,837 unruly passenger incidents overall, according to a new report from the International Air Transport Association (IATA). While that’s actually a modest drop from the 10,854 incidents reported in 2015, IATA believes airlines underestimate or under-report the extent of the problem. 

Of particular concern, IATA notes the 2016 numbers show a troubling increase in the times (11% in 2015 to 12% in 2016), incidents escalated from simply verbal, or "level 1," incidents to "level 2" incidents that involved physically abusive or obscene behavior, verbal threats of physical violence or tempering with emergency and safety equipment.

During 2016, 169 reported incidents ended with unruly passengers being restrained, a jump from the 113 reported in 2015.

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Airline crews restraining more unruly , drunk passengers .

Airlines safety protocols have four levels and crew members get training and are prepared for them. They start drinking too much . There’s even a policy of restraining unruly passenger with handcuffs and then handing them over to police after the plane lands.

Cabin crew can often manage level 1 incidents with de-escalation techniques learned in training, says Tim Colehan, IATA’s Assistant Director or External Affairs. 

But, for 2016, Colehan says: “We saw an increase in incidents where all other forms of de-escalation had been exhausted and the cabin crew had no other option but to restrain the unruly passenger for the safety of everyone onboard.”

Looking more closely at the numbers, IATA found the incidents of unruly passengers most often related to people who were intoxicated by alcohol or drugs. 

Sometimes, Colehan notes, passengers drink heavily in the airport before they board their flights or pour themselves drinks onboard from bottles they’ve purchased at duty free shops.

Passengers refusing to comply with safety rules -- such as refraining from smoking onboard, turning off electronic devices or observing seat belt signs -- was the second-most often cited issue relating to unruly passenger incidents. Disputes between passengers was the third.

Unfortunately, passengers involved in serious unruly behavior during a flight often face no charges when the flight lands.

That’s because, under existing international laws, it is the authorities in the country where the aircraft is registered that have jurisdiction over an incident that takes place during a flight. And if a plane leaves one country and lands in another, authorities on the ground are often powerless to take action.

IATA hopes to help solve this problem by getting countries to sign what it calls the Montreal Protocol 2014, which gives legal jurisdiction over unruly passenger issues to the country where an airplane lands.

Twenty-two countries must adopt the the protocol to put the rules into force. So far, 12 have done so. IATA hopes the international aviation treaty will be fully ratified by 2019.

 

Flight Changes Course 300 Miles From Destination .
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