Travel How to Tell If You're Getting Ripped Off on Airfare

23:25  12 february  2018
23:25  12 february  2018 Source:   cntraveler.com

How James McAvoy Got Totally Ripped

  How James McAvoy Got Totally Ripped James McAvoy has always seemed fragile, with his sensitive blue eyes and his wan smile. No longer. The guy has gotten straight-up ripped. If you’re anything like me, then you probably first fell in love with James McAvoy in the 2007 film Atonement, where he was, in true Scottish form, pale, freckly, and very thin. In that film, like so many of his other films, he seemed fragile, with his sensitive blue eyes and his wan smile, like a baby bird that was in need of your protection.But that was then and this is now.

So is there a way to measure just how bad a deal you ’ re getting ? Actually, yes—and according to Perkins, it’s pretty simple: “Back when the government But what would make an airfare a true rip - off is where the yield would be way out of line with the costs per mile; in other words, where the price

How to Tell If You ’ re Getting Ripped Off on Airfare . Carly Zinderman. March 24, 2018. Expect a short flight to be cheaper than a long one? That might not be the case. The contributing editor of Airfare Watchdog has a warning for frequent fliers about price.

a large air plane flying in the sky© Getty To anyone other than an airline bean counter, airfares make absolutely no sense. They have no relation to the distance flown or the duration of your journey —in fact, the cheapest tickets often send you off on multiple, time-wasting detours. There’s little transparency in the process of how airlines arrive at their prices, and they’re in a constant state of flux. Indeed, the industry worldwide logs more than 3.9 million fare changes every single day, according to the Airline Tariff Publishing Company (APTCO), an industry data provider.

Economists would point out that’s precisely what happens in a deregulated market. “Price is the mechanism that balances supply and demand,” says Ed Perkins, contributing editor of Airfarewatchdog.com and a former editor-in-chief of Consumer Reports Travel Letter. “There are a lot of things at work here, including whether an airline is flying out of its fortress hub, and whether it’s facing competition from industry disruptors, like Spirit.”

You Can Fly Around The World For Less Than $1,200

  You Can Fly Around The World For Less Than $1,200 If your goal for 2018 is to see more of the world this year, it’s your lucky day. The savvy travel savers at Airfare Spot just announced a new Around The World airfare deal for only $1,189. The itinerary links together a series of dirt-cheap flights from select U.S. cities (Boston, Los Angeles, New York and San Francisco) to visit four cities on four continents ― London, Singapore, Sydney, and Honolulu ― and leaves two to three days between flights. Given the quick pace of the itinerary, it’s not for the faint of heart.

How to tell if a plane ticket is a good deal. Travelers no longer have to guess whether they got a decent deal on airfare or not. There’s now a straightforward formula that can reveal whether those plane tickets are a good deal — or something to skip, according to software and cloud computing

To anyone other than an airline bean counter, airfares make absolutely no sense. They have no relation to the distance flown or the duration of your journey —in fact, the cheapest tickets often send you off on multiple, time-wasting detours.

Still, some prices seem so out of whack that even in today’s laissez-fare climate, you have to wonder what’s going on. So is there a way to measure just how bad a deal you’re getting? Actually, yes—and according to Perkins, it’s pretty simple: “Back when the government was regulating the airlines, they came up with something called the standard industry fare level,” Perkins says. “It set a benchmark for how much the airlines could charge per mile—that’s what’s known as ‘yield’—and allowed for a reasonable return,” he said, of around 12 percent. That went out the window once airlines were deregulated in 1978, but using yield—that is, what the airlines are getting from you per mile—is as valid a measure as any, and it can help shine the light on some of the more egregious outliers.

These Are the Best and Worst Airlines of the Year

  These Are the Best and Worst Airlines of the Year One major shock? JetBlue ranked surprisingly low.To come up with their list, The Points Guy team weighed a number of criteria, starting with price, which includes airfare and baggage and change fees, followed by convenience, made up of the routes offered by an airline, on-time performance, and cabin comfort. The rankings also considered the inevitable problems associated with air travel (appropriately titled "headaches," which examined lost baggage, customer service, and getting bumped from a flight) and looked at extra perks, like the quality of the frequent flier program and airport lounge offerings.

Description: To anyone other than an airline bean counter, airfares make absolutely no sense. They have no relation to the distance flown or the duration of your journey —in 2. Text link: Routehappy. Domain: routehappy.com.

Indie musicians, you have access to legal support! Joel Andrew. How Pandora Royalties Really Work: A Complete Guide [infographic]. If you ’ re not getting special promotional attention from the venue What are some other ways clubs can rip off artists? Got any horror stories of your own to share?

But what would make an airfare a true rip-off is where the yield would be way out of line with the costs per mile; in other words, where the price you’re paying is a huge mark-up from what it’s costing the airline to transport you. (Think of it as the airline industry’s version of a fancy hotel bar that turns a 100 percent profit on its bespoke cocktails.) No one’s suggesting airlines shouldn’t make money, of course—it’s just that we don’t expect to be robbed.

See the video.

At Traveler’s request, Bob Harrell of Harrell Associates, an airline pricing consultant, crunched some data on airfares in a recent two-week period in January. For our purposes, he stuck to what he calls “average leisure airfares,” meaning restricted, and usually nonrefundable, prices. Based on the per-mile yield passengers were paying, the absolute worst deals based on distance were the shuttle flights between New York and Boston and Washington, which had average yields for coach fares of between $1.60 and $1.88 a mile—which sounds like peanuts, until you consider the average yield for a restricted air ticket is about 19 cents. And what’s the total damage to your wallet? I did my own fare search, and a two-day trip from New York to Boston in mid-February on Delta would set me back $928 round-trip. (That's nearly double the price of what it would cost from the U.S. to Italy on this flight deal.) “For a family, or really, anyone other than a business traveler on an expense account, it probably makes more sense to jump in the car,” for the 250-mile trip, Perkins says.

Why Airfare Could Get Even Cheaper This Spring

  Why Airfare Could Get Even Cheaper This Spring Students aren't the only ones taking a break this spring. Airlines for America estimates 150.7 million passengers around the world will fly on U.S. airlines from March 1 to April 30, a four-percent increase over the same period last year. The airline trade association released its spring travel forecast for 2018 on Wednesday, reporting that airlines have added a combined 114,000 seats per day to accommodate the growth.

Mark: “I remember a time when I marked an airfare up 0 over what you could get it for on the internet or with the airline direct. “Always ask for a discount on the insurance, anything less than a 20 per cent discount and you ’ re getting ripped off .”

How to Tell If You ' re Getting Ripped Off on Airfare . In this guide, you'll get the complete African safari packing list - including 4 factors when packing, how to pack minimalist, and just what to include with specific recommendations.

Of course, the airlines operating the shuttles—American and Delta—would argue that passengers on these flights are primarily business travelers paying for the convenience of frequent service and a classier in-flight experience, which is more expensive to provide than a long-distance flight on a widebody plane. A closer look at the shuttle trips, however, shows that many of these flights are via smaller regional planes operated by commuter partners, offering pretty basic service—in contrast to the over-the-top frills in the days when Pan Am and Trump Air plied the route. True, those smaller planes aren’t as cost-efficient as larger jets, but their crews are paid significantly less than the majors’, too. Other above-average yields for mid-January popped up in flights out of fortress hubs—like United’s redoubt in Newark, and Delta’s Atlanta base.

Averages don’t tell the whole story, of course, but Harrell’s data showed some other disparities; outside the shuttle, the route with the highest yields was Philadelphia to Pittsburgh, at 75 cents per mile, and fares into Minneapolis got the Super Bowl bump, and were among the highest of any domestic route for that week, with yields of more than 50 cents per mile.

There's an All-out Airfare War for Flights to Hawaii — Here's How to Take Advantage

  There's an All-out Airfare War for Flights to Hawaii — Here's How to Take Advantage Since last June, we’ve been closely following an airfare war that’s entangled almost every major domestic carrier, including United, Hawaiian, and Alaska Airlines. And last week, Southwest took the next step toward realizing its Hawaiian ambitions by receiving a permit to operate at Honolulu’s Daniel K. Inouye International Airport.

And how can you avoid getting ripped off with repairs in the future? John @ Fearless Men on February 7, 2013 at 4:45 pm said: You ’ re right that if they’re willing to rip one gender off they’ll probably try to rip anyone off .

The old adage " you get what you pay for" applies to cars. Never tell the salesperson you want to trade in your old car. If you buy from an individual there is little chance you will have any recourse should you get ripped off .

So how to calculate whether the airline ticket you’re about to buy is a good or bad deal? You can figure out pretty easily how much you'll pay per mile, but it’s less obvious how much it costs the airline to fly you from point A to B, although airlines do report their systemwide costs per available seat mile on their balance sheets. And then, and most importantly, is how competitive a market is. And that’s why, as Perkins notes, “airlines that control a very high percentage of a market tend to be able to set above-market fares.”

At an airline like Delta, the operating costs per seat, per mile, recently ranged from 10 to 14 cents a mile, but that’s spread over their entire system. According to Henry Harteveldt, travel analyst and founder at Atmosphere Research, the northeast air shuttles do cost more to operate: “The shorter the flight, the higher the costs of that flight,” he notes. “And in the northeast, you’ve got air traffic congestion and bad weather, which pushes up expenses.” But still, he says, “ there’s no reason why it should cost an airline any more to operate those flights than any other flights of a similar length.”

So what’s really at work here? “Airlines aren’t playing fare war games like they used to in the 1990s, when they’d charge $19 one-way just to steal market share,” he says. Those days are long gone, and today prices are often a reflection of—in Perkins’ words—“what they can get away with.”

When You Can Cancel Flights and Hotels and Still Get a Full Refund

  When You Can Cancel Flights and Hotels and Still Get a Full Refund Things don’t always go according to plan when you’re traveling, and that can be a big problem for many reasons, chief among them that changing plans usually means paying fees. Let’s keep that money in your pocket. Here’s what you need to know when it comes to canceling flights or hotel reservations. You Can Always Cancel Flights Within 24 Hours of BookingAccording to the U.S.

If you ' re smart and observant, however, you can keep the damage to a minimum. Stock up on singles and keep your credit card at home, here's what you need to know before you get taken like a chump at the strip club.

You should learn how to change your own oil. Unless they are physically removing the injectors, you ' re getting ripped off big time.

For instance, airports that have severe limits on flight volume, like New York’s JFK, San Francisco, and others, can often have higher-than-normal fares, even if they aren’t dominated by a single carrier. And airports where service dropped sharply after an airline merger—take Pittsburgh, St. Louis, or Memphis—are often more expensive to fly into. But still, airlines can’t get too greedy, says Harteveldt. That will just invite what they dread most—a leaner, more agile rival who can steal away their customers with lower fares.

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Will Airfare Transparency Be a Thing of the Past? .
A bill is moving through Congress that eliminates fare transparency.In 2011, the full-fare advertising rule changed how airlines published their fares. The rule forbade airlines from displaying just the base fare for a flight and required them to include all of the mandatory taxes and fees in the purchase price.

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