Travel Do You Know Where the Hidden Handrail Is on Airplanes?

21:30  11 october  2017
21:30  11 october  2017 Source:   Southern Living

Airplanes Could Be Pilotless by 2025

  Airplanes Could Be Pilotless by 2025 What's your biggest fear when flying in an airplane? Is it being stuck for hours next to someone who won't stop talking to you?According to the report, a switch to full automation could annually save the air-transportation industry $35 billion (by the elimination of pilot training programs, for example). What's more, the technology could cut passenger fares by around 10 percent. But are customers willing to pay less money to autonomously fly through the sky in a metal tube at a rate of 550 m.p.h.? For this writer, the answer is a firm no (I even struggled with autonomous driving). And I'm not the only one.

According to Conde Nast Traveller most airplanes built in the past fifteen years feature an integrated handrail just under the overhead lockers. Find the hidden button underneath the arm rest. There's also a "secret" button which few air passengers know about, which allows you to lift the armrest on

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  Do You Know Where the Hidden Handrail Is on Airplanes? © Swell Media/Getty Images Picture this: You’re mid-flight cruising at 30,000-feet and thoroughly enjoying a lovely little "Fixer Upper" marathon. Or perhaps you’re toasting your temporary solitude with an indulgent nap. Maybe you’re simply trying to power through a Powerpoint presentation for work. Then, out of nowhere, someone jarringly grabs the top of your seatback and snaps you out of your productivity grind or state of relaxation. “Does this lady or fella really have to grab my seat like that?” you ponder, as the offender makes his or her way to the lavatory or to grab headphones from their friend in 16C.

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According to Conde Nast Traveller most airplanes built in the past fifteen years feature an integrated handrail just under the overhead lockers. Find the hidden button underneath the arm rest. There’s also a “secret” button which few air passengers know about, which allows you to lift the armrest on

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GALLERY: One of the most famous airport terminals in the world is about to become a swanky hotel (Provided by Business Insider)

<p> The Trans World Airlines Flight Center at JFK International Airport is one of the most famous terminals buildings in the world. With its instantly recognizable lines, the Eero Saarinen designed building has been a New York landmark since 1962.</p><p> However, with TWA's demise in 2001, the terminal has sat abandoned for the past decade and a half. Now, the iconic structure is getting a new lease on life as an airport hotel. MCR Development, the hotel investment firm behind the terminal's revival, plans to restore the build to its original state while adding a 505-room hotel.</p><p>

The TWA Hotel project has the support of New York Governor Andrew Cuomo.

"The conversion of the TWA Flight Center into a new state-of-the-art hotel will preserve this iconic landmark while cementing JFK's status as a crown jewel of aviation," The Governor said during the hotel's groundbreaking last year.

According to MCR, the project is privately funded with no government subsidies.

The hotel is slated to open in 2019. Here's a closer look at the building, and some renderings of what it'll look like once the hotel is built:

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One of the most famous airport terminals in the world is about to become a swanky hotel

Well, there’s a lifehack for that. Nestled below the overhead bins, there’s a curved, hollowed-out space. According to Condé Nast Traveler, the feature has been included on many aircrafts built in the past 15 years. While you may have noticed flight attendants using it for balance, many passengers choose to ignore the handy innovation.This so-called “handrail” is essentially a smooth gutter that works as a steadying, guiding feature to help you navigate the aisle. Simply tuck your fingers into the groove and maintain your balance on your next trip to the restroom. Without interrupting a mama’s precious Chip-and-Jo-time.

Are Older Planes More Dangerous?

  Are Older Planes More Dangerous? Short answer: It depends.

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This article was originally published on SouthernLiving.com

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The Hidden Meaning of the Triangle Stickers Above Your Airplane Seat .
Next time you’re in an airplane, scan the walls. You might spot four black or red triangle stickers above the windows, two on each side of the plane. They probably don’t mean anything to you, but they mean a lot to flight attendants.If you go up to the seats with the triangles and look out the window, you’ll notice the stickers line up with the edge of the airplane wing—one for the front, and one for the back. GALLERY: 7 Hidden Features on Airplanes You Had No Idea Existed (Provided by Reader's Digest) 1/8 SLIDES © kc. bangkaew/Shutterstock Keep an eye out for these on your next flight.

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