Crime Arkansas prepares for its fourth execution in eight days

02:01  28 april  2017
02:01  28 april  2017 Source:   FOX News

Inmate slated to die Thursday due at hearing

  Inmate slated to die Thursday due at hearing LITTLE ROCK, Ark. — One of the five Arkansas inmates who are still scheduled to die before the end of the month is due at a hearing regarding his request for further DNA testing of evidence from his case. Ledell Lee was moved from prison Tuesday morning and was expected at a 1:30 p.m. hearing in Little Rock. He is one of two inmates scheduled for execution Thursday.The 51-year-old Lee was sentenced to die for the 1993 killing of his neighbor Debra Reese, who was struck 36 times with a baseball bat-like tool. He is also serving prison time for the rapes of a woman and teen from Jacksonville.

If Williams dies, it would be Arkansas ' fourth execution in eight days after not conducting one since 2005. The death chamber in the US state of Arkansas , which recently executed its first inmate in 12 years.

– Arkansas will reach the end of an aggressive execution schedule Thursday as it prepares for a fourth lethal injection in eight days after initially planning With one of its lethal injection drugs set to expire at the end of April, Arkansas had scheduled eight executions over the final two weeks of April.

Kenneth Williams, 38, is set to die Thursday for killing a former deputy prison warden. © Arkansas Department of Correction Kenneth Williams, 38, is set to die Thursday for killing a former deputy prison warden.

A convicted killer in Arkansas is set to die by lethal injection on Thursday night, making him the fourth inmate the state executes this month.

The impending death of Kenneth Williams, 38, ends an aggressive execution schedule that originally called for putting eight men to death over an 11-day period. The executions were scheduled to take place before one of the state’s lethal injection drugs expires Sunday.

Williams faces the death penalty for killing former deputy prison warden Cecil Boren after escaping from the Cummins Unit prison in a 500-gallon barrel of pig food in 1999. He snuck into Boren’s house where he killed the warden and stole his guns and truck, then drove to Missouri and crashed into a water delivery truck, killing the driver, according to investigators.

Why are executions stopped? Death penalty questions answered

  Why are executions stopped? Death penalty questions answered Expect another long day of legal wrangling Thursday over Arkansas' plan to execute inmates in the coming week.Ledell Lee and Stacey Johnson were to be put to death Thursday night, but Johnson's execution was at least temporarily halted and Arkansas' ability to use one of its execution drugs was called into question. Lawyers for inmates filed multiple legal challenges to derail a plan that originally called for eight men to be put to death before April 30, when Arkansas' supply of a sedative used in lethal injections expires.

LITTLE ROCK, ARK.— Arkansas will reach the end of an aggressive execution schedule Thursday as it prepares for a fourth lethal injection in eight days after With one of its lethal injection drugs set to expire at the end of April, Arkansas had scheduled eight executions over the final two weeks of April.

A fourth execution is set for Thursday. The state said the executions needed to be carried out before its supply of the sedative midazolam expires on April 30. Arkansas executed four men in an eight day period in 1960.

Before he broke out of prison, Williams had been serving a life sentence for killing University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff cheerleader Dominique Hurd in 1998 after forcing her and a friend to withdraw money from an ATM in Pine Bluff, Arkansas. At the end of that trial, he taunted Hurd’s family by turning to them after the sentencing and saying, “You thought I was going to die, didn’t you?”

While in prison, Williams also confessed to killing another person in 1998.

Attorneys for Williams asked the U.S. Supreme Court to stay the killer’s execution, claiming Arkansas didn’t provide Williams a forum to litigate his claim that he is intellectually disabled and ineligible to be executed, Fox 16 reported. The filings are among several appeals from Williams’ attorneys aimed at halting his execution.

Arkansas Can Execute One Inmate Tonight, Court Rules

  Arkansas Can Execute One Inmate Tonight, Court Rules The state of Arkansas was preparing to execute one man Thursday night mere hours after a court overruled a restraining order that blocked the state's use of one of its lethal injection drugs. Faced with a number of legal hurdles, Arkansas in the early evening won a legal victory allowing it to move forward with the execution of Ledell Lee at 7 p.m. CT (8 p.m.) on Thursday.The state Supreme Court sided with state prosecutors and tossed a restraining order that a county court on Wednesday night had placed on Arkansas's use of the paralytic vecuronium bromide — one of three drugs in the lethal injection cocktail.

Although Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson initially set eight execution dates, half of them have been halted by courts. → My Boyfriend Isn’t My Soulmate, He’s My Carrot. Arkansas Prepares To Carry Out Its Fourth And Final…

A fourth execution is set for Thursday. The state said the executions needed to be carried out before its supply of the sedative midazolam expires on April 30. Arkansas executed four men in an eight - day period in 1960.

Arkansas had scheduled eight executions over the final two weeks of April because one of its lethal injection drugs is set to expire at the end of the month. That would have been the most in such a short period since the U.S. Supreme Court reinstated the death penalty in 1976.

If Williams is put to death at 7 p.m. CT, the state will have carried out four executions since last Thursday, including a double execution Monday, the nation’s first since 2000. Courts issued stays for four of the inmates.

Click for more from Fox 16.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

UN rights office 'deeply troubled' about Arkansas executions .
The U.N. human rights office says it's "deeply troubled" by four executions over eight days in Arkansas, insisting an accelerated timetable for them based on the looming expiration of a sedative used "adds to the arbitrariness and cruelty of the whole process."Spokeswoman Liz Throssell stopped short Friday of condemning the executions, but said: "Rushing executions can deny prisoners the opportunity to fully exercise their right to appeal against their conviction and/or sentence."Throssell said use of the sedative midazolam "has been criticized for failing to prevent people from suffering pain.

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