Crime The Bill Cosby Trial: What Went Wrong?

16:31  19 june  2017
16:31  19 june  2017 Source:   Vulture.com

Cosby lawyers fighting civil suits by 10 women

  Cosby lawyers fighting civil suits by 10 women Bill Cosby's sexual assault case in Pennsylvania has ended in a mistrial, but the comedian's civil lawyers still are fighting lawsuits against him by 10 women around the country. Currently, seven women have defamation suits pending in Massachusetts, while three more have defamation or sexual battery suits pending in California. Cosby has denied any wrongdoing.

Bill Cosby ’s trial ended with a deadlocked jury, and it will go to court once again. Latest News from Vulture. 7 mins ago The Bill Cosby Trial : What Went Wrong ? Was the case simply not as strong as the prosecutors hoped?

Bill Cosby ’s trial ended with a deadlocked jury, and it will go to court once again. Social media erupted Saturday morning when news broke that Bill Cosby ’s sexual assault trial had ended in a hung jury.

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In Cosby Case, First Trial Is a Guide for the 2nd

  In Cosby Case, First Trial Is a Guide for the 2nd Both sides may feel exhausted after the mistrial that ended Bill Cosby’s sexual assault case, but a new round of prosecution is looming just months ahead.The fatigue from Saturday’s mistrial has hardly faded for either side in the Bill Cosby sexual assault case, but both need to begin preparing almost immediately for a new trial that the prosecution has vowed to bring.

RELATED VIDEO: Everything to Know About the Bill Cosby Trial . “What’s happening here is wrong , and the only people who can stop it is you. … A man’s life is at stake.” Andrea Constand.

Jurors in the Bill Cosby trial said Thursday they are deadlocked and cannot come to a unanimous consensus on any of the three counts of aggravated indecent assault the comedian faces. Judge Steven O’Neill asked the jury, which began deliberating Monday evening, to go back to deliberating in

Social media erupted Saturday morning when news broke that Bill Cosby’s sexual assault trial had ended in a hung jury. When the judge announced a mistrial a little after 10 a.m., questions loomed about what could have possibly happened to cause the jury to become so hopelessly deadlocked in this high-profile case, and whether the Montgomery County District Attorney’s Office would take on the 79-year-old comedian a second time.

By lunch, D.A. Kevin R. Steele had vowed that his office would retry Cosby. He said Andrea Constand, the woman at the center of the case (she’s accusing Cosby of drugging and sexually assaulting her in his Philadelphia home in 2004), is also on board and willing to testify again.

As if to demonstrate just how firmly the battle lines have been drawn in this case, Cosby’s camp gave no sign that they would give in to speculation over his past relationships with women. The comedian’s spokesperson, Andrew Wyatt, not only criticized the women accusing Cosby of assault (many of the comedian’s accusers attended the trial and could be seen crying outside the courthouse today after the announcement was made) but also took a jab at the attorneys looking to prosecute. With Cosby standing quietly by his side, he told them in no uncertain terms that they should “go back to law school.”   The Bill Cosby Trial: What Went Wrong? © Provided by Vulture

Bill Cosby trial puts a spotlight on how assault survivors cope

  Bill Cosby trial puts a spotlight on how assault survivors cope The Bill Cosby trial has brought renewed attention to the plight of sexual assault survivors, especially those who stay silent or maintain some sort of relationship with their alleged abuser. Andrea Constand, then a Temple University basketball manager, says she went to Cosby’s Philadelphia home in January 2004 to discuss her career plans. She says Cosby, a Temple trustee and someone she considered a mentor, drugged and molested her. Cosby denies the accusations and says the encounter was consensual.  On Tuesday, jurors continued deliberations on Day 7 of the trial.

— Jurors in the Bill Cosby trial said Thursday they are deadlocked and cannot come to a unanimous consensus on any of the three counts of aggravated indecent assault the comedian faces. Judge Steven O’Neill asked the jury, which began deliberating Monday evening, to go back to deliberating in

The jury in the Bill Cosby trial is putting in a long day's work as it considers sexual assault charges against the comedian. Jurors deliberated into the night Tuesday, going outside for some fresh air after 8 p.m.

Gloria Allred, attorney representing 33 of the more than 60 women who have publicly accused Cosby of assaulting them over 40 years, also spoke to the media on Saturday. Allred, who’s attended the trial since day one, said, “It’s too early to celebrate.” She’s digging in her heels as she prepares to bring a civil case against Cosby in California as early as this month. Her client in that case has accused Cosby of raping her at the Playboy mansion when she was just 15 years old.

This weekend, however, the biggest question is what exactly led to the mistrial? Was the case simply not as strong as prosecutors hoped? Did the jury have trouble navigating the three felony indecent sexual assault charges?

From the start, the evidence in this controversial case hinged on believability, and specifically on whether Constand was credible during her seven hours on the stand.

Melissa Gomez, a nationally known trial consultant, said it’s likely the jury was polarized on each end of the spectrum, and that both the defense and prosecution can learn a great deal about what happened based on the questions the jury asked during the six-day deliberation.

Bill Cosby mistrial shows laws must change

  Bill Cosby mistrial shows laws must change Bill Cosby is a free man, for now anyway, because a jury never could agree on whether one of TV’s most comforting dads drugged and sexually assaulted Andrea Constand at his mansion outside Philadelphia in 2004. Constand, 44, is the only one of dozens Cosby accusers whose report led to a criminal trial because in the other cases, the statute of limitations had expired. Bill Cosby is a free man, for now anyway, because a jury never could agree on whether one of TV’s most comforting dads drugged and sexually assaulted Andrea Constand at his mansion outside Philadelphia in 2004.

May 24, 2016: Bill Cosby arrived in court for a key hearing on whether prosecutors have enough evidence to put the 78 year old comedian on trial . And I went upstairs and I went into my pack and I broke one whole one and brought a half down and told her to take it." "Your friends," Cosby said he

He said prosecutors also factor in the willingness of victims to go through a trial again. Legal Expert Discusses Cosby Trial . NBC10's Jim Rosenfield joins Enrique Latoison to discuss the details surrounding the Bill Cosby Trial .

The repeated reexamination of key testimony from both Constand and Cosby supports the theory that jurors were likely torn between who to believe and what happened on the night in question. During the more than 50 hours of deliberations, the jury not only asked for a rereading of statements Cosby made about his admitted use of Quaaludes with women, they also wanted to see Constand’s phone records.

“It can come down to the smallest thing,” said Gomez. The jury may be looking at Constand and wondering how she remembers what happened the night she claims she was drugged and assaulted, or even why she voluntarily took pills. Any reasonable doubt, said Gomez, can create a deadlocked jury.

The fact that Cosby did not take the stand in his own defense may have also played a role in the deliberations. As such, the defense may not call him for the second trial if they think he’s a loose canon or unreliable. “It happens a lot with high-powered people,” said Gomez.

Ultimately, she said, “The jury wants information that supports their position.” It’s not unusual for them to have questions about evidence so they can use it to bolster their opinions, like the phone call between Constand’s mother and the comedian, which seemed to be a major focus during deliberations in the past few days.

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Bill Cosby ’s defense lawyer says he is concerned about the entertainer’s health following what he described as In late 2014, dozens of women went public with accusations that Cosby drugged and sexually assaulted them ‘Waiting so long, it’s wrong ’. McMonagle said this year’s trial was unfair.

After three days, the jury in entertainer Bill Cosby 's sex assault trial outside of Philadelphia has been unable to reach a verdict on three counts of aggravated indecent assault. He said prosecutors also factor in the willingness of victims to go through a trial again.

There are many other variables to consider for the next trial — like what people already know about the case and whether Constand will elaborate on any new details, even whether new witnesses are called. The celebrity quotient will certainly continue to complicate this already complex case. “Cosby’s fame could have worked for or against him,” said Gomez, depending on if jurors felt deceived or enamored.

D.A. Steele said that Cosby’s celebrity does not preclude him from prosecution a second time. It’s expected that both sides will be looking for jurors who are unbiased and, no matter what they know of the case or Cosby, that they’ll be able to judge based on the evidence presented in the courtroom.

“The fact that the jurors dug in their heels is significant,” said Gomez. “They learned that this is a polarizing case, and both [sides] have a winning strategy.”

Related slideshow: The rise and fall of Bill Cosby (via Photo Services):

One night, two stories: In the Bill Cosby saga of sex, race, celebrity and alleged assault, even the jury couldn't agree on the truth .
The dozen jurors in the Bill Cosby sexual assault trial spanned a diverse demographic range: white men in their 20s and 30s, middle-aged African Americans, elderly white women. But with that diversity also came deadlock. After five long days of deliberations, the jury found itself unable to render a verdict -- like so much of this country, unable to find consensus on charged questions of race, age, power and gender. Cosby will now face a new trial as soon as October, the judge said in declaring a mistrial Saturday morning. The prosecutor said that he hopes to settle the matter by pressing ahead with the same three counts of aggravated indecent assault.

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