Crime Officials: Exhumation of killers from vet cemeteries is rare

18:40  13 august  2017
18:40  13 august  2017 Source:   Associated Press

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FILE - In this Aug. 30, 1972 file photo, Guillermo Aillon, center, emerges from the Superior Court House where he was denied bail on charges he murdered his estranged wife and her parents in New Haven, Conn. Aillon died in 2014 and his remains were disinterred from the Connecticut State Veterans Cemetery in Middletown, Conn., on July 3, 2017, after state veterans' affairs officials learned that he had been serving a life prison sentence for the murders. It's not clear where the remains were taken. © AP Photo/Bob Child, File FILE - In this Aug. 30, 1972 file photo, Guillermo Aillon, center, emerges from the Superior Court House where he was denied bail on charges he murdered his estranged wife and her parents in New Haven, Conn. Aillon died in 2014 and his remains were disinterred from the Connecticut State Veterans Cemetery in Middletown, Conn., on July 3, 2017, after state veterans' affairs officials learned that he had been serving a life prison sentence for the murders. It's not clear where the remains were taken. HARTFORD, Conn. — The recent exhumation of an Army Vietnam veteran's body from the Connecticut State Veterans Cemetery was a rare invocation of federal laws aimed at keeping murderers and rapists out of veterans burial grounds, federal and state officials say.

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The remains of Guillermo Aillon were disinterred from the Middletown cemetery July 3, after state veterans' affairs officials learned that he had been serving a life prison sentence for stabbing to death his estranged wife and both her parents in North Haven in 1972. It's not clear where the remains were taken.

Only one other person appears to have been exhumed from a U.S. veterans' cemetery under a 2013 federal law that gave the federal Department of Veterans Affairs the authority to dig up the remains of murderers and rapists, according to the VA.

In 2014, the body of Army veteran Michael LeShawn Anderson was removed from the Fort Custer National Cemetery in Augusta, Michigan. Authorities said Anderson killed Alicia Koehl, wounded three other people and killed himself in a 2012 shooting in Indianapolis. The 2013 law, named after Koehl, specifically authorized the exhumation of Anderson.

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Burying convicted murderers and rapists at veterans' cemeteries was banned by a 1997 federal law, which was aimed at preventing Oklahoma City bomber and Army veteran Timothy McVeigh from being interred at Arlington National Cemetery.

The law prohibits people sentenced to life in prison or death on convictions for federal or state capital crimes and certain sexual offenses from being buried in national veterans cemeteries and other veterans burial grounds — such as the Connecticut cemetery — that receive federal funding.

But exhumation authority didn't exist until the 2013 law, which also was made to apply to people who committed murders and rapes but were not available for trial and not convicted. The law applies only to veterans buried after it took effect on Dec. 23, 2013, with the exception for Anderson.

The remains of another veteran convicted of murder, Russell Wayne Wagner, were removed from Arlington National Cemetery under an order approved by Congress in 2006 as part of a veterans' bill. Wagner killed an elderly couple in Hagerstown, Maryland, in 1994.

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Connecticut officials did not know about Aillon's convictions because he was transferred from prison to a hospital before he died in 2014 and his death certificate listed the location as the hospital, said Thomas Saadi, spokesman for the Veterans Affairs Commissioner Sean Connolly.

"It's a very rare occurrence," Saadi said of exhumation. "The Aillon situation was very unique."

Saadi said the state has since required funeral directors to attest that veterans whose families have applied for them to be buried in the state veterans' cemetery were not convicted of murder or rape.

Relatives of Aillon did not return messages seeking comment. They previously have said they were unaware of the burial restrictions and were upset with the exhumation plans.

At the Michigan cemetery, Anderson was buried with full military honors, despite Koehl's killing.

"It was just a total insult," Koehl's father-in-law, Frank Koehl, told the Detroit Free Press.

Anderson's mother, Debra Graham, said her son's remains were relocated to another cemetery.

"I couldn't believe it. It hurt so bad," she told The Associated Press, referring to the exhumation. "A lot of pain and grief. I try not to think about it. I try to think about the good times we had."

Eclipse: Family over the moon with totality baby .
As the moon made its way across the sun during a rare solar eclipse on Monday, Charlotte Roel Easterly said hello to the world. The 7-pound, 11-ounce baby girl was born at Sacred Hospital at 1:36 p.m. CT at the exact moment of the height of the eclipse in Pensacola. "It was literally during the eclipse, it was the most amazing thing," said Karen Lee, the baby's aunt. Even in the busy maternity ward, employees and patient family members took turns going outside with special glasses to view the eclipse, Lee said. "People had been talking about it all day," said Lee. USA TODAY Network: Complete coverage of the solar eclipse Her sister, Taria White, went into labor around 9 a.m. Lee said her sister had joked months earlier that she was going to have the baby during the eclipse, but it was an unexpected surprise when Charlotte was actually born during the height of the rare solar event. The odds were, well, astronomical. It takes three celestial bodies (the sun, moon and Earth) all of which are on various orbital paths, to line up in the exact way at the right time to create an eclipse. The last total solar eclipse visible in the U.S. was on Feb. 26, 1979. Monday's total eclipse was visible in the U.S. only — the first time that's happened since the country's founding in 1776, according to USA TODAY. "It was really special," Lee said.

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