Offbeat Pardoned ranchers arrive home, plan lots of 'decompressing'

09:01  12 july  2018
09:01  12 july  2018 Source:   msn.com

Oregon ranchers who sparked standoff to return home after Trump pardon

  Oregon ranchers who sparked standoff to return home after Trump pardon Two Oregon ranchers whose sentencing on arson convictions sparked the 2016 armed occupation of a wildlife refuge were due to return home on Wednesday, after being pardoned by U.S. President Donald Trump, the family said in a statement. The 41-day standoff, which occurred in response to the jailing of the ranchers for setting a fire that spread to public land, marked a flare-up in the long-simmering dispute over federal land policies in the U.S. West. It turned deadly when police shot one of the occupiers.The family of jailed rancher Dwight Hammond, 76, and his son, Steven, 49, in a statement late Tuesday thanked Trump.

– Father and son ranchers , who were the focus of a battle about public lands and were freed from prison after receiving a presidential pardon , were welcomed home Wednesday in Oregon by "We're going to do a lot of decompressing and get back to our families," Steven Hammond said.

Pardoned ranchers arrive home , plan lots of ' decompressing '. Residents say man on meth broke into their home . Source: WSB-TV. Atlanta United's Leandro Pirez and Franco Escobar talk about their defensive playing styles.

President Donald Trump speaks with reporters before boarding Marine One on the South Lawn of the White House, Tuesday, July 10, 2018, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci) © The Associated Press President Donald Trump speaks with reporters before boarding Marine One on the South Lawn of the White House, Tuesday, July 10, 2018, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

SALEM, Ore. — Father and son ranchers, who were the focus of a battle about public lands and were freed from prison after receiving a presidential pardon, were welcomed home Wednesday in Oregon by relatives and horseback riders carrying American flags.

"We're going to do a lot of decompressing and get back to our families," Steven Hammond told reporters and well-wishers after he and his father Dwight stepped from a private jet and into the arms of family members in the high-desert town of Burns.

Trump Pardons Oregon Men Whose Case Sparked Wildlife Refuge Takeover

  Trump Pardons Oregon Men Whose Case Sparked Wildlife Refuge Takeover Dwight Hammond and his son, Steven Hammond, had been imprisoned for arson on federal land. Their sentences inspired protesters who took over the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge.Dwight L. Hammond, now 76, and his son, Steven D. Hammond, 49, became a cause célèbre that inspired an antigovernment group’s battle with the federal government over its control of rural land in Oregon. The occupation of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge resulted in the death of a rancher from Arizona.

Pardoned ranchers arrive home , plan lots of ' decompressing '. Residents say man on meth broke into their home . Source: WSB-TV. Official: 911 issues delayed response to school massacre.

Pardoned ranchers arrive home , plan lots of ' decompressing '. ___ July 8: The official heading the rescue operation declares that "D-Day" has arrived as he announces the start of the operation to bring the boys and their coach out of the cave.

Just 25 miles (40 kilometers) away is Malheur National Wildlife Refuge, which was taken over in 2016 by armed protesters angered by the five-year prison sentences given to the Hammonds after they were convicted of setting fires on federal land.

The standoff lasted 41 days, ending when occupation leaders Ammon and Ryan Bundy were arrested and LaVoy Finicum was killed by authorities.

The occupiers, who believe federal control of public lands violates the Constitution, insisted the Hammonds were victimized by federal overreach.

Steven Hammond gave thanks Wednesday to President Donald Trump and the many people who wrote to him and his father while they were in prison.

"We received thousands of letters. There's a time you get to that point where a letter means a lot," Steven Hammond said, his voice choking up in video posted on Twitter by The Oregonian/OregonLive.

Trump pardons ranchers in case that inspired 2016 occupation

  Trump pardons ranchers in case that inspired 2016 occupation President Donald Trump is pardoning two cattle ranchers convicted of arson in a case that case sparked the armed occupation of a national wildlife refuge in Oregon. Dwight and Steven Hammond were convicted in 2012 of intentionally and maliciously setting fires on public lands. The arson crime carried a minimum prison sentence of five years, but a sympathetic federal judge, on his last day before retirement, decided the penalty was too stiff and gave the father and son much lighter prison terms.Prosecutors won an appeal and the Hammonds were resentenced in October 2015 to serve the mandatory minimum.

Chipper Jones talks about contingency plan if wife goes into labor during Hall of Fame induction. Pardoned ranchers arrive home , plan lots of ' decompressing '.

Pardoned ranchers arrive home , plan lots of ' decompressing '. 12385010 Home Experts.

Some environmentalists see a pattern in the way Trump is approaching public lands, which comprise almost half of the U.S. West, and have linked the pardons to his position.

Under Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke, the administration has shrunk the size of protected national monuments in Utah and is considering reductions of other sites.

"Special interests are working with the Trump administration to dismantle America's public lands heritage, and this will be viewed as a victory in that effort," spokesman Arran Robertson of the environmental group Oregon Wild said about the pardons.

Witnesses testified that a 2001 arson fire occurred shortly after Steven Hammond and his hunting party illegally slaughtered deer on federal Bureau of Land Management property. The fire burned 139 acres of public land and destroyed all evidence of the game violations, the U.S. attorney's office said.

Anti-Government Groups Cheer Trump’s Pardons of Ranchers Who Inspired Militia

  Anti-Government Groups Cheer Trump’s Pardons of Ranchers Who Inspired Militia Photo Illustration by The Daily Beast Anti-government groups are thrilled by President Trump’s pardons Tuesday of Oregon ranchers Dwight and Steven Hammond, whose conviction on arson charges inspired a right-wing takeover of federal property in Oregon in 2014. Dwight Hammond, 76, and his son, Steven Hammond, 49, have been a cause célèbre for militias groups, members of the far-right “patriot” movement, and critics of federal land policy in the West ever since they were convicted of arson on federal land in 2012 and sentenced to five years in prison.

Pardoned ranchers arrive home , plan lots of ' decompressing '. During Trump's address at CIA headquarters, on his first full day as commander in chief, Trump noted that Churchill "doesn't come from our country but had a lot to do with it."

Pardoned ranchers arrive home , plan lots of ' decompressing '. Residents voice concerns after Fulton County commissioners announce plans to raise millage rate.

The jury also convicted Steven Hammond for a 2006 blaze that prosecutors said began when he started several back fires, violating a burn ban, to save his winter feed after lightning started numerous fires nearby.

Federal anti-terrorism law called for mandatory five-year sentences for the 2012 convictions. A federal judge said such a long sentence would shock his conscience and instead sentenced Dwight Hammond to three months in prison and Steven Hammond to a year and one day.

A federal appeals court in October 2015 ordered them to be resentenced to the mandatory prison time, and the two went back to prison, sparking the occupation of the federal wildlife refuge.

Nevada rancher Cliven Bundy, a well-known figure in the battle over public land and the father of Ammon and Ryan Bundy, welcomed the pardons, saying the Hammonds were victims of federal overreach.

"Now we've finally got a president of the United States who is paying attention to what is going on," Bundy said.

Jamie Rappaport Clark, president of the group Defenders of Wildlife, countered that the Hammonds were convicted of arson, a serious crime.

"Whatever prompted President Trump to pardon them, we hope that it is not seen as an encouragement to those who might use violence to seize federal property and threaten federal employees in the West," Clark said.

___

Follow Andrew Selsky on Twitter at https://twitter.com/andrewselsky

Farm group: There’s ‘a lot of anxiety’ over Trump tariffs .
A National Farmers Union representative says American farmers are growing even more concerned over President Trump's new trade tariffs. Matt Purdue, who is the Government Relations Representative for the organization, thinks there's "a lot of anxiety" within rural communities across the country over the Trump's trade policies, which impose steep tariffs on some of America's closet allies like Canada and China. "I think a lot of people are willing to take him at his word - that what he's doing is going to be helpful for farmers and ranchers in rural communities," Purdue said.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

This is interesting!