Opinion It's not the rhetoric, it's the guns

16:55  17 june  2017
16:55  17 june  2017 Source:   MSN

GOP Congressman 'Regrets' Blaming Democrats' Rhetoric For Virginia Shooting

  GOP Congressman 'Regrets' Blaming Democrats' Rhetoric For Virginia Shooting Rep. Chris Collins (R-N.Y.) expressed “regret” for suggesting that Democratic rhetoric about President Donald Trump had inspired a gunman to target Republican lawmakers at a congressional baseball practice on Wednesday morning. James Hodgkinson, the suspect who allegedly opened fire at the baseball field in Alexandria, Virginia, was a supporter of Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) with a record of violent behavior.

It ' s not the rhetoric , it ' s the guns ! Moreover, while it ’ s true there’s too much hate-filled language in today’s politics and everybody needs to tone down the rhetoric , the most inflammatory language is not coming from the left.

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Editor's note: The opinions in this article are the author's, as published by our content partner, and do not necessarily represent the views of MSN or Microsoft.

No words can adequately describe the tragedy we experienced this week when a lone gunman opened fire on a group of congressmen doing nothing more than playing baseball -- getting in one last practice in Alexandria, Virginia, before this year's version of the last occasion left in Washington where members of both parties actually have a good time together: the annual Congressional Baseball Game.

Within minutes, Rep. Steve Scalise (R-LA.) was down and one staffer and one former staffer were wounded, as were two brave Capitol Police officers who rushed the shooter and returned fire. Without a doubt, had those two officers not been present, the ballfield would have turned into a slaughterhouse.

Rhetoric and Bullets

  Rhetoric and Bullets Our talk should never promote violence, but it needn’t be timid.Editor’s note: The opinions in this article are the author’s, as published by our content partner, and do not necessarily represent the views of MSN or Microsoft.

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In the wake of the shooting, there were those who seized the moment to unite the country in the right mix of outrage and sorrow, led by Speaker Paul Ryan, who told House Members: "An attack on one of us is an attack on all of us." One image of that day he'll never forget, said Ryan: "And that is a photo I saw of our Democratic colleagues gathered in prayer this morning after hearing the news."

Sadly, there were also dunderheads who seized the moment to divide the country by scoring political points, led by former Speaker Newt Gingrich, who called the shooting "part of a pattern" and told Fox News: "You've had an increasing intensity of hostility on the left." While Rep. Chris Collins (R-NY) rushed to blame Democrats: "I can only hope that the Democrats do tone down the rhetoric."

Turning an attempted assassination into cheap partisan sniping is not only disgusting, it's dead wrong. Just because the gunman happened to be a Bernie Sanders supporter who hated Republicans doesn't mean he represents all Democrats, any more than a mass murderer who happens to be a Christian represents Jesus Christ.

Moreover, while it's true there's too much hate-filled language in today's politics and everybody needs to tone down the rhetoric, the most inflammatory language is not coming from the left. It's from the right. And nobody's guiltier of it than Donald Trump, who has called James Comey a "nut job," Barack Obama a "sick man," Hillary Clinton a "nasty woman," and journalists "the enemy of the American people."

  It's not the rhetoric, it's the guns © Provided by Tribune Content Agency

Or consider this tweet from Sen. Rand Paul's (R-KY) campaign, just one year ago, on June 23, 2016, quoting Fox News legal analyst Andrew Napolitano: "Why do we have a Second Amendment? It's not to shoot deer. It's to shoot at the government when it becomes tyrannical." One can only hope the good Senator had second thoughts about that kind of incendiary rhetoric when he himself was one of those shot at on the Alexandria ballfield.

More importantly, the whole discussion about political rhetoric misses the point. It doesn't matter whether the gunman was a Democrat, Republican, independent, socialist, communist, or Green Party member. The point is: He had no business being able to buy, own, and tote around an assault rifle and an automatic pistol.

Where's the outrage about gun violence? In 2016, according to the Gun Violence Archive, there were 384 mass shootings -- defined as four or more killed or wounded by gunfire -- in the United States. More than one a day! So far in 2017, there have been 154. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that, between 2001 and 2013, 406,496 people died by firearms on U.S. soil. An average 31 Americans are murdered by guns every day.

What happened in Alexandria, in fact, wasn't the only shooting on June 14. Three people were also gunned down at a UPS facility in San Francisco. Six people were killed and 37 wounded by gunfire on the streets of Chicago last weekend. And, as shocking as it was to see a U.S. congressman struck by gunfire, let's not forget this: the life of every one of those victims in San Francisco and Chicago is worth every bit as much as the life of any Member of Congress.

What will it take for Congress to act? What will it take before Congress stops protecting the gun manufacturers and starts protecting the American people?

Even though they failed to act after Virginia Tech, Sandy Hook, Charleston, or Orlando, you might think they'd consider some common-sense gun safety measures after one of their own is struck.

Think again. Six years ago, Congress did nothing after Congresswoman Gabby Giffords was shot. They'll do nothing this year after Congressman Steve Scalise was shot. The NRA still rules the U.S. Congress. Shame!

(Bill Press is host of a nationally-syndicated radio show, CNN political analyst and the author of a new book, "Buyer's Remorse," which is available in bookstores now. You can hear "The Bill Press Show" at his website: billpressshow.com. His email address is: bill@billpress.com. Readers may also follow him on Twitter at @bpshow.)

Rhetoric and Bullets .
Our talk should never promote violence, but it needn’t be timid.Editor’s note: The opinions in this article are the author’s, as published by our content partner, and do not necessarily represent the views of MSN or Microsoft.

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