Politics Trump's budget hits poor Americans the hardest

23:10  12 february  2018
23:10  12 february  2018 Source:   MSN

Trump: 'I'd love to see a shutdown' if Dems don't meet immigration demands

  Trump: 'I'd love to see a shutdown' if Dems don't meet immigration demands President Trump said Tuesday he would "love" to see a government shutdown if Democrats do not agree to his demands on immigration. "We'll do a shutdown and it's worth it for our country. I'd love to see a shutdown if we don't get this stuff taken care of," Trump told a gathering of law enforcement officials and members of Congress at the White House."If we have to shut it down because the Democrats don't want safety and, u"We'll do a shutdown and it's worth it for our country. I'd love to see a shutdown if we don't get this stuff taken care of," Trump told a gathering of law enforcement officials and members of Congress at the White House.

and Unacceptable”: Trump ’ s Housing Agency Budget Hits Poorest Americans the Hardest . President Donald Trump on Thursday unveiled a budget proposal that would cut billion in And poor Americans , particularly those in need of subsidized housing, are likely to feel the brunt of it.

In fact, working-class Americans , who were a bulwark in Trump ’ s electoral victory, stand to get hit the hardest . For the most part, the proposal calls for an increase in military spending, offset by massive cuts to government programs that benefit the poor .

a display case in a store filled with lots of food: WASHINGTON, DC : (L) Anthony, 15, waits for his mother Raphael Richmond who is loading up on meat at the discount grocery store where they do a big once-a-month shopping trip on the day that their monthly SNAP account is re-funded. © Photo by Michael S. Williamson/The Washington Post/ WASHINGTON, DC : (L) Anthony, 15, waits for his mother Raphael Richmond who is loading up on meat at the discount grocery store where they do a big once-a-month shopping trip on the day that their monthly SNAP account is re-funded.

President Trump proposed a budget Monday that hits the poorest Americans the hardest, slashing billions of dollars in food stamps, health insurance and federal housing subsidies while pushing legislation to institute broad work requirements for families receiving housing vouchers, expanding on moves by some states to require Medicaid and food stamp recipients to work.

Talk centers on Mick Mulvaney if John Kelly leaves

  Talk centers on Mick Mulvaney if John Kelly leaves Mick Mulvaney, President Donald Trump's chief budget officer, is in the spotlight this week as staffers consider what might happen if White House chief of staff John Kelly leaves in the wake of the Rob Porter scandal. Conversations have been going on all week long among White House staffers as to what a "post-Kelly world looks like," a source familiar with these discussions said. And "the conversation keeps coming back to Mulvaney." Trump also has been quizzing those around him about their opinion of Mulvaney in recent weeks, aides and associates tell CNN.

× Trump ' s slash-and-burn budget could hit his own political base the hardest . This time, the victims would be federal government programs aimed at some of the neediest Americans , many of whom voted for Trump last year in the hopes that he might improve their lot.

Mulvaney rejected accusations that Trump ’ s budget unfairly targets the poor , arguing instead that it amounts to a broad rethink of the country’s welfare system. “We need folks to work.

The Trump budget proposal would gut the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, better known as food stamps, by $17.2 billion in 2019 -- equivalent to 22 percent of the program’s total cost last year. It calls for additional cuts of more than $213.5 billion over the next decade, a reduction of nearly 30 percent, according to the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities.

In addition, Trump is proposed a full-scale redesign of SNAP, which currently provides an average of $125 per month to 42.2 million Americans. For the last 40 years, the program has allowed beneficiaries to use SNAP benefits at grocery stores as if they were cash. Under the budget proposal, the  Department of Agriculture would use a portion of those benefits to buy and deliver a package of U.S.-grown commodities to SNAP households each month, using the government’s buying power to obtain common foods at lower costs.

Trump's budget to request border wall funding

  Trump's budget to request border wall funding The budget request that President Trump is releasing Monday will propose more than $23 billion for border security and immigration enforcement - including funds for a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border, the White House said Sunday. The request on border security comes as the Senate is about to start a free-wheeling debate on immigration.

Trump ’ s budget eliminates the “Meals on Wheels” program. | Occupy Democrats. WASHINGTON – He calls it the “ America First” budget , but the proposal Donald Trump unveiled yesterday pushes only billionaires to the head of the line. Most Americans get pushed aside.

The Trump administration unveiled a budget for 2018 on Tuesday that seeks to overhaul many of the country’ s safety-net programs for low-income and struggling Americans . Clinton Calls Trump Budget an 'Unimaginable Level of Cruelty' 3:11.

Subscribe to the Post Most newsletter: Today’s most popular stories on The Washington Post

“This budget proposes taking away food assistance from millions of low-income Americans -- and on the heels of a tax cut that favored the wealthy and corporations," said Stacy Dean, president for food assistance policy at the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities. "It doesn’t reflect the right values.”

The proposal repeats several cost-cutting measures from last year, including new restrictions on eligibility and stricter requirements around the use of work-requirement waivers, which allow states with high unemployment rates to extend benefits to adults who are out of work for longer than three months.

Congress has final say over spending -- but Monday's budget proposal is seen as an important sign of Trump's priorities.

The budget proposal would also "reform" programs at the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development "to encourage the dignity of work and self-sufficiency," the document said.

Trump budget to include billions to combat opioid epidemic

  Trump budget to include billions to combat opioid epidemic President Trump's budget will propose billions of dollars to combat the opioid epidemic plaguing the country, months after the administration designated the crisis a national public health emergency.The White House's fiscal 2019 budget set to be released Monday will include nearly $17 billion for the opioid epidemic that's killinThe White House's fiscal 2019 budget set to be released Monday will include nearly $17 billion for the opioid epidemic that's killing more Americans per year than car accidents, according to an outline from the Office of Management and Budget (OMB).

How Trump ' s Budget Would Impact Cities' Poorest Residents. Programs that help low-income Americans are not among the administration’s priorities in its just-released budget . Altered Carbon doesn’t think about any of these things too hard , which is one of the reasons it never fully

Trump ’ s proposed budget would eliminate the Community Services Block Grant, a These are small claims in the Nation’s eye, but they loom large in the hearts and lives of poor Americans .” Alaska’s rural poor get hit by the budget proposal too, despite having two Republican senators.

Trump's proposed budget for the 2019 fiscal year includes an 14 percent cut to HUD, amounting to $6.8 billion below the agency’s current $48 billion spending, an even deeper cut than his previous year's proposal which had been the most dramatic cut to HUD since President Ronald Reagan slashed the agency’s funding in the early 1980s.

The administration has proposed eliminating the entire fund for public housing capital repairs, a savings of nearly $2 billion a year. The targeted cut comes at a time when public housing faces a backlog of capital needs upwards of $40 billion, said Diane Yentel, president and chief executive of the National Low Income Housing Coalition. In New York City, about 80 percent of public housing tenants suffered heating and hot water outages in recent months because the aging boiler systems are in desperate need of repair, Yentel said.

"The administration wants state and local governments to take care of that, which is just a total abdication of its responsibility," she said.

Trump also proposed cutting a federal housing subsidy program, known as Section 8 vouchers, by nearly $1 billion, which Yentel said would result in more than 250,000 low-income families losing their housing assistance. The cuts would come on top of the administration's proposal to raise the rent for low-income families receiving public housing help.

Five takeaways from Trump’s fiscal 2019 budget proposal

  Five takeaways from Trump’s fiscal 2019 budget proposal President Trump rolled out a $4.4 trillion budget on Monday that provides a window into the administration’s priorities for the coming year. The administration is using the budget to advance its goals of strengthening the military, improving infrastructure and constructing a border wall. The budget also takes aim at government programs the White House sees as wasteful.The budget is unlikely to become law, but some of the administration's proposals are likely to be part of discussions on Capitol Hill, with administration officials testifying before Congress on the document this week.

Jacquelyn martin ap. Editorials. Trump ' s budget plan hits poor people hard . They are pandering to the right-wing base that put them in the White House: conjuring visions of deadbeats collecting checks and living off the hard work of other Americans .

Donald Trump , whose populist message and promises to help American workers propelled him to the White House, is set to issue a budget proposal on Tuesday that instead takes aim Trump ’ s budget would drastically cut domestic programs controlled by Congress, slashing .7 trillion over 10 years.

The proposed HUD budget, like last year, would eliminate funding for Community Development Block Grants, which play a key role in disaster recovery, as well as grants to states and local governments to increase homeownership for the lowest-income Americans, and funding for neighborhood redevelopment. The Trump administration said it has proposed shutting down programs that are "duplicative or have failed to demonstrate effectiveness" and that state and local governments are better equipped to shoulder the responsibility for community and economic development.

On healthcare for low-income Americans, Trump’s budget calls for cutting federal Medicaid funding by $250 billion over the next 10 years, as the administration envisions passing a law “modeled closely” on a Senate Republican proposal that failed last fall to repeal the Affordable Care Act.

The White House plan, similar to that spearheaded by Sens. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) and Bill Cassidy (R-La.), would dramatically cut federal health spending and send some of the savings to the states. Republicans say doing so would give governors the flexibility to bring down costs, but experts say that the overall reduction in government spending would cost millions of Americans their health insurance.

The White House plan also calls for new per-person limits on the amount of health care each Medicaid enrollee can use, as well as tying federal spending on the program to the cost of inflation.

All of the deep cuts to the social safety net that Trump proposed last year were rejected by Congress on a bipartisan basis, and the budget bill passed by Congress last week increased spending amounts in discretionary programs. But Yentel said she fears  the drastic cuts in Trump's budget proposal lower the bar for what's considered acceptable.

"The president’s budget request is always considered dead on arrival in Congress, especially in an election year," Yentel said. "My concern is that it leaves open a space for a compromise to be less severe but still a significant cut to programs."

Opinions | A groundswell for sanity .
Fatigue over constant smarmy news transcends political identity.The split in American politics we may be missing is not left vs. right or pro-Trump vs. anti-Trump but normality vs. the Trump-inspired Washington circus.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

This is interesting!