Politics What's in the immigration bills the Senate is debating?

15:11  14 february  2018
15:11  14 february  2018 Source:   CBS News

Trump: 'I'd love to see a shutdown' if Dems don't meet immigration demands

  Trump: 'I'd love to see a shutdown' if Dems don't meet immigration demands President Trump said Tuesday he would "love" to see a government shutdown if Democrats do not agree to his demands on immigration. "We'll do a shutdown and it's worth it for our country. I'd love to see a shutdown if we don't get this stuff taken care of," Trump told a gathering of law enforcement officials and members of Congress at the White House."If we have to shut it down because the Democrats don't want safety and, u"We'll do a shutdown and it's worth it for our country. I'd love to see a shutdown if we don't get this stuff taken care of," Trump told a gathering of law enforcement officials and members of Congress at the White House.

WASHINGTON -- The Senate kicked off its debate Friday on the "gang of eight" comprehensive immigration reform bill with vows from Sen. "We should do what is right, what ' s fair, what ' s just," he said.

Chat with us in Facebook Messenger. Find out what ' s happening in the world as it unfolds. Vermont senator revives debate over gay rights in immigration bill . "I think it's going to pass the U.S. Senate with a substantial margin," Cruz said.

The Senate is currently debating a number of immigration bills ahead of the March 5th deadline to do something about the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, or DACA. That's the Obama-era initative, which was later cancelled by President Trump.The program provided legal protections for "Dreamers," who are immigrants who were brought to the U.S. illegally as children.

Mr. Trump ended DACA in September and gave Congress until March 5th to replace it. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell promised an open-ended debate on a DACA replacement as part of a deal with Democrats to end last month's brief government shutdown. But it will be enormously difficult for Congress to pass any kind of replacement. Adding to the pressure, McConnell also wants to wrap up debate on the bill by the end of this week. 

Cruz only senator to vote against moving to immigration debate

  Cruz only senator to vote against moving to immigration debate Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas) was the only senator to oppose moving toward an immigration fight on the Senate floor. Senators voted 97-1 on ending debate over whether or not to take up the House-passed bill being used as a vehicle for the Senate's debate.

The Senate is currently debating a number of immigration bills ahead of the March 5th deadline to do something about the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, or DACA. That' s the Obama-era initative, which was later cancelled by President

Let friends in your social network know what you are reading about. Senate will begin debating first immigration overhaul since Reagan signed 1986 bill . Bill would allow 11 million unauthorized immigrants to get U. S . citizenship, enhance border security.

For a DACA replacement to pass in the Senate, it will need 60 votes, meaning that any legislation will require substantial bipartisan support. It would also need to win over a majority of the more conservative House before it arrives on the president's desk. And Mr. Trump, a noted immigration hawk, has intimated that he will only sign a bill that includes provisions most Democrats abhor, such as funding for a wall along the southern border.

Here are some of the bills the Senate is debating this week, and why it'll be difficult for any of them to pass.

The Secure and Succeed Act

The Secure and Succeed Act is backed by Republican immigration hawks in the Senate, like Iowa Sen. Chuck Grassley and Arkansas Sen. Tom Cotton. It adheres closely to the White House's immigration framework, which was released by the administration ahead of last month's State of the Union address.

The Latest: Senate votes to begin immigration debate

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an open-ended debate on immigration — an exceedingly rare step that, in effect, will allow senators to attempt to build a bill from scratch on the Senate floor. “As the Senate is poised to start debate on the humanitarian crisis Donald Trump caused when he cruelly ended DACA, here’ s what every

George W. Bush weighs in on Russian interference in election - here' s what he said. TV. The Senate is debating immigration reform and is expected to vote on it later today. With the details of the Senate bill well-known, House Speaker John Boehner said at a news conference the separate

In broad strokes, the bill would provide a path to citizenship for 1.8 million DACA recipients, $25 billion in border security and wall funding, limits on family-based migration, and would eliminate the diversity visa lottery.

The bill's backers say it's the only legislation on the table that has a chance of becoming law and is a workable compromise because it protects nearly two million immigrants while also giving immigration hawks the security funding they want. "We shouldn't be focused on passing bill out of Senate, we should be focused on passing a law, something that can get the majority vote in the House and something that President Trump can sign," Cotton told CBS This Morning on Tuesday.

Not enough Democratic support: Although McConnell has said he supports the legislation, the Secure and Succeed Act is considered dead on arrival by lawmakers. That's because it would need not only uniform support from all 51 Republicans in the Senate, which is unlikely, but also at least 9 Democrats, who have balked at the proposal. So far, no Democrat has voiced support for this proposal.

Trump presses Senate to adopt his immigration priorities

  Trump presses Senate to adopt his immigration priorities President Donald Trump is sending a message to the Senate on immigration: Pass a bill based on his priorities. He's thanking GOP Sen. Chuck Grassley of Iowa for introducing legislation similar to the immigration framework pushed by the White House.The measure would offer a chance for citizenship for up to 1.8 million people who arrived in the U.S. as children and stayed illegally. It would provide $25 billion for border security, restrict family-based immigration and end a visa lottery.

The bill was introduced in the Senate Judiciary Committee of the U.S. Senate . Currently, Senators are proposing and debating amendments to the bill . This entry was posted in What ' s Happening and tagged immigrant rights, immigration reform.

Sponsors of a sweeping immigration bill won a big victory Tuesday when it was approved by the Senate Judiciary Committee. But they also got a clear picture of how opponents and critics will try to change the bill when it' s debated on the Senate floor and in the U. S . House of Representatives.

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, the top Democrat in the chamber, is instead calling for a "narrow bill" because "now is not the time, nor the place, to reform the entire legal immigration system." Schumer and other Democrats want a fix for DACA recipients, with perhaps some extra border security funding to sweeten the pot for Republicans.

McCain-Coons

This bill has been introduced by the bipartisan team of Sen. Chris Coons, D-Delaware, and Sen. John McCain, R-Arizona. A companion bill in the House has 54 co-sponsors, with an even number of Republicans and Democrats. The bill would provide eventual citizenship for Dreamers. It would also provide money for a study on border security needs. But it neither includes any border wall funding, nor does it seek to curb future immigration by ending the extended family-based migration program, which the White House calls "chain migration." It also does not end the diversity visa lottery program Mr. Trump dislikes. The measure would provide more resources for immigration courts, which are dealing with severe backlogs. 

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Who knows what this bill will look like when it’ s all said and done, especially with such a small Republican majority. UPDATE: Here’ s more on the open debate : Immigration , border security and DACA are front and center in the Senate this week.

What ' s going on with immigration reform? I'm glad you asked! After months of debate , wrangling, and amendments, senators just passed S.744, the "Border Security, Economic Opportunity, and Immigration Modernization Act," their So what does the Senate bill consist of, then?

White House unlikely to support: The White House basically rejected the proposal before it was even officially introduced. It is unlikely to gain traction among conservative Republicans, in large part because it does nothing about so-called "chain migration," and doesn't appropriate border wall funding. The president has said any DACA deal that doesn't include border wall funding is a "total waste of time."

Graham-Durbin

The bipartisan proposal was negotiated by Senate Minority Whip Dick Durbin, D-Illinois, and Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-South Carolina, and reached in January. It would appropriate $2.7 billion in border security improvements, eliminate the diversity lottery program and would target the chain migration system. It would also provide a pathway to citizenship for "Dreamers" and would define eligibility criteria, including that recipients must have entered the U.S. by June 15, 2012. According to a spokesman for Graham, the plan would include $1.6 billion for a "border wall/barriers/fencing." 

White House rejects this: The plan -- the bill text of which was never formally introduced -- is also backed by Sens. Jeff Flake, R-Arizona, Cory Gardner, R-Colorado, Susan Collins, R-Maine, Lamar Alexander, R-Tennessee, Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, and Sen. Bob Menendez, R-New Jersey. But the White House has already dismissed the plan in no uncertain terms. "It's the opposite of what I campaigned for," Mr. Trump told Reuters about the bill in an interview last month

The Senate put four immigration bills up for a vote. They all failed.

  The Senate put four immigration bills up for a vote. They all failed. Lawmakers couldn’t find a path forward to fix DACA.The dream looks dead.

In the meantime, Senate Republican leaders must figure out what bill they actually want to pass in the end. Next Up In Politics & Policy. The Senate ’ s immigration debate , starting next week, is really at least 7 different debates .

"It' s a real debate on an issue where we really don't know what the outcome is going to be." The outcome is particularly uncertain because the Senate House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., has not yet said how the House will proceed beyond promising to vote on an immigration bill , so long as it has

Senate Minority Leader Sen. Chuck Schumer of N.Y., center, calls on a reporter on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Feb. 13, 2018, following the weekly Democratic policy luncheon. © AP Photo/Susan Walsh Senate Minority Leader Sen. Chuck Schumer of N.Y., center, calls on a reporter on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Feb. 13, 2018, following the weekly Democratic policy luncheon.

DREAM Act

Most recently introduced by Graham, Durbin, and Arizona Republican Sen. Jeff Flake, the latest version of the DREAM Act would essentially codify the protections former President Barack Obama created for young immigrants. It would also provide a path to citizenship for those young immigrants.

Doesn't have wall funding White House wants: The president has tweeted that any DACA deal that doesn't include border wall funding is a "total waste of time." Aside from the White House, conservatives in Congress are also likely to oppose a solution that lacks funding for other border security measures, or any additional restrictions on future immigration. 

A change in US agency's mission: No longer serving a 'nation of immigrants' .
WASHINGTON - America is no longer a "nation of immigrants," at least in the mission statement of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services. Director L. Francis Cissna announced the rewrite of the statement Thursday, scrapping the more immigration-friendly language that said the agency "secures America's promise as a nation of immigrants by providing accurate and useful information to our customers."The new version has a distinctly tougher tone, stressing the agency's role as "protecting Americans, securing the homeland, and honoring our values.

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