Politics Trump Having Dinner with Supreme Court Justices

23:16  23 april  2017
23:16  23 april  2017 Source:   LawNewz

Neil Gorsuch has first day as an associate justice on the Supreme Court

  Neil Gorsuch has first day as an associate justice on the Supreme Court <p>After his swearing-in ceremony at the White House Rose Garden with President Trump on Monday, Justice Neil Gorsuch reported to work on Thursday, preparing to hear his first Supreme Court arguments next Monday.</p>After his swearing-in ceremony at the White House Rose Garden with President Trump on Monday, Justice Neil Gorsuch reported to work on Thursday, preparing to hear his first Supreme Court arguments next Monday.

President Trump will be having dinner with Supreme Court justices Thursday. Trump 's newly confirmed Supreme Court pick Neil Gorsuch is expected to join. It's not clear if all of the other eight Supreme Court justices plan to attend.

“That evening, the President will have dinner with the Justices of the Supreme Court , including his successfully confirmed nominee Justice All eyes will be on Trump and the Court in the upcoming years since he has the chance to transform it for decades by adding more conservative jurists.

  Trump Having Dinner with Supreme Court Justices © Provided by Mediaite, LLC

The White House announced Sunday that President Donald Trump will have dinner Thursday with the U.S. Supreme Court.

“That evening, the President will have dinner with the Justices of the Supreme Court, including his successfully confirmed nominee Justice Neil Gorsuch,” the announcement read.

Judging by the wording, it seems like all nine are expected show up, though this remains unclear. What they’ll talk about also remains unclear. We’ve reached out to the White House for comment.

Gorsuch asks his first questions from Supreme Court bench

  Gorsuch asks his first questions from Supreme Court bench It took less than 15 minutes for newly minted Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch to ask his first questions from the bench. Gorsuch and his colleagues were hearing arguments Monday for the first time since President Donald Trump's pick was sworn in April 10. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File) WASHINGTON — It took less than 15 minutes for newly minted Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch to ask his f Gorsuch and his colleagues were hearing arguments Monday for the first time since President Donald Trump's pick was sworn in April 10.

Judicial conservatives are buzzing about a new Supreme Court justice who could cement a conservative majority on the bench for decades. President-elect Donald Trump has given a firm commitment to Republicans that he will stick to a list of 21 potential conservative nominees released

Donald Trump ’s Supreme Court appointees, even if conservative, might not be able to restrain his likely constitutional overreach. Would justices appointed by Trump be able to restrain him? In 1952, the National Archives in Washington arranged to put an original parchment text of the Constitution

All eyes will be on Trump and the Court in the upcoming years since he has the chance to transform it for decades by adding more conservative jurists. Three seats may plausibly open up as he remains in office. Two liberals, Ruth Bader Ginsberg and Stephen Breyer, are 84 and 78. A third, noted-swing voter Anthony Kennedy, is 80 and rumored to be thinking about retirement. The next youngest justice, conservative Clarence Thomas, is only 68. For comparison’s sake, Antonin Scalia, who passed away in February 2016, was 79.

Whatever happens, Gorsuch will be there to see it. He is 49, and will expectedly sit on the court for decades.

[Screengrab from Gorsuch’s April 2017 swearing-in ceremony via White House]

Supreme Court clears the way for cities to sue banks over foreclosure crisis .
The Supreme Court expanded the reach of federal housing law Monday, ruling that cities can sue major banks for discriminatory lending practices that hurt low-income neighborhoods during the Great Recession. The decision gives city leaders a potentially powerful weapon against lenders, including those who were accused of predatory practices that triggered the foreclosure crisis after 2008.Until now, these legal claims faced an apparent obstacle. The Fair Housing Act forbids racial discrimination against "any person." Lawyers for the banks said the law protected only people who suffered discrimination, not cities.

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