Politics No new CBO score Monday as Senate delays health care vote

00:20  17 july  2017
00:20  17 july  2017 Source:   CBS News

Changes to Senate bill may not be enough to sway moderates, conservatives

  Changes to Senate bill may not be enough to sway moderates, conservatives <p>Senate Republican leaders on Thursday released a modified version of their health care bill to repeal and replace Obamacare, but the changes may not be enough to win over both conservatives and moderates who were opposed to the original plan. Already, two Republicans are signalling they'll vote no.</p>Senate Republican leaders on Thursday released a modified version of their health care bill to repeal and replace Obamacare, but the changes may not be enough to win over both conservatives and moderates who were opposed to the original plan. Already, two Republicans are signalling they'll vote no.

With their health care bill facing a perilous path, Senate Republican leaders have decided to push off a vote until after Congress returns from next week's July Fourth recess, GOP It's expected the bill will be altered and get a new score from the Congressional Budget Office before it comes back up.

Republican Senate Leaders Will Delay Vote on Health Care Bill That Everyone Hates. It does, however, seemingly mean that the objections that many Republican senators raised to their chamber's bill—especially after its CBO score was released Monday —were not just empty posturing.

The Senate and Capitol Dome are seen on Capitol Hill in Washington, Monday, June 26, 2017, as Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky., faces challenges within the GOP this week in advancing the Republican health care bill.: ap-17178457469322.jpg© J. Scott Applewhite / AP ap-17178457469322.jpg

The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) will not be releasing its updated score for the Senate health care plan Monday as originally planned, according to a Republican aide on the Senate Budget Committee.

The shift follows Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell's announcement Saturday night that a vote on the bill will be delayed due to Arizona Republican John McCain's absence from the health care debate. McCain is away from Washington, D.C., while he recuperates from surgery for a blood clot above his left eye.

The CBO will now take more time on its analysis of Senator Ted Cruz's amendment before releasing its overall report, CBS News' Nancy Cordes reports.

McConnell delays healthcare vote after McCain surgery

  McConnell delays healthcare vote after McCain surgery Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) announced Saturday night that the vote on Senate Republicans ObamaCare repeal and replace bill would be delayed until a later date.&nbsp;The news comes after Senator John McCain (R-Ariz.) released a statement that he would miss this week's votes as he recovers from surgery.

The Congressional Budget Office has not had a chance to score the Senate 's bill yet. Under the House bill, the CBO found found that 23 million Americans would lose their coverage by 2026. Lacking Support, GOP Leaders Delay Health Care Bill Vote .

Republicans are scrambling to win over their caucus on their Senate health care bill after the Congressional Budget Office released its score on Monday night, which could end Majority Leader Mitch McConnell's hopes for a hasty vote this week. The CBO projected 22 million more Americans

Axios first reported that Republicans had asked the CBO to analyze Cruz's plan. The Republicans called for one estimate of the bill that includes the Texas senator's changes and another estimate that doesn't, so that they might get a better sense of the impact of his proposal, according to a GOP aide, who is familiar with discussions.

The original CBO report for the Senate's Better Care Reconciliation Act (BCRA) estimated that 22 million more Americans would be uninsured in 2026 under the plan, while the deficit would be reduced by $321 billion over the next decade. CBO also found the BCRA would lower average premiums by 20 percent in 2026 compared to current law. But in 2018, premiums would go up by 20 percent, and in 2019, they would rise by 10 percent compared to current law, according to the CBO estimate.

The 7 steps ahead for Senate Republicans to pass their health care bill

  The 7 steps ahead for Senate Republicans to pass their health care bill This is how it will happen.

Majority leader wants new CBO score . (CNN) - Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell will delay the vote on the Republican leadership's health care bill until after the July 4 recess.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is delaying the vote on Obamacare repeal while Senator John McCain recovers from a surgical procedure. "While John is recovering, the Senate will continue our work on legislative items and nominations and will defer consideration of the Better Care Act."

Cordes reports that Republicans were pushing the CBO to release its analysis without a score on the Cruz amendment -- for timing reasons and because of Republicans leaders' concerns about how the CBO might score the Cruz amendment.

Under Cruz's and Utah Senator Mike Lee's Consumer Freedom Option, insurance companies would be allowed to sell any health coverage plan they wish, as long as they also provide one plan that satisfies the mandates of the Affordable Care Act.

The Cruz amendment enabled GOP leaders to secure Cruz's support, and made the Senate bill more attractive to House conservatives. But the amendment received a rash of backlash from Blue Cross Blue Shield, as well as the nation's biggest organization representing health care insurers, America's Health Insurance Plans (AHIP). They released a letter slamming the proposal as "simply unworkable."

CBO scores modified version of Senate GOP's repeal and replace plan .
This score differs from a cost estimate CBO released Wednesday, which analyzed plan to repeal 2010 health care law now and replace it later . Here's what the CBO said about earlier versions of the Senate bill:Repeal only (CBO estimate: July 19): That estimate projected that 32 million more people would become uninsured over the next decade. It also said that 17 million more people would become uninsured next year, compared to current law.Version 1 of BRCA (CBO estimate, June 26): The original version of BCRA would have left 22 million more people uninsured over the next 10 years.

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