Politics White House doubles down on Trump’s Charlottesville comments, ignores calls to directly confront white supremacy

18:56  13 august  2017
18:56  13 august  2017 Source:   MSN

Ryan: 'White supremacy is a scourge'

  Ryan: 'White supremacy is a scourge' House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) denounced white supremacy in the wake of the racially charged clashes in Charlottesville on Saturday. "Our hearts are with today's victims. White supremacy is a scourge. This hate and its terrorism must be confronted and defeated," Ryan said on Twitter. Our hearts are with today's victims. White supremacy is a sco urge. This hate and its terrorism must be confronted and defeated," Ryan said on Twitter. Our hearts are with today's vic urge. This hate and its terrorism must be confronted and defeated.

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Pence defends Trump response to Charlottesville violence

  Pence defends Trump response to Charlottesville violence Vice President Mike Pence on Sunday condemned white supremacists and defended President Trump following criticism that the administration failed to adequately condemn specific groups after Saturday violence in Charlottesville, Virginia."Trump had neglected to name the groups that organized the rally that turned violent in Charlottesville the previous day.

12, a coalition of clergy and faith leaders will gather in Charlottesville , Va., to confront ideologies of white supremacy and stand for “liberating love.” McLaren told Sojourners white supremacists are seeking to reassert their dominance and described Donald Trump as the alt-right’ s “champion of

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BRIDGEWATER, N.J. — Two of President Trump's top advisers on Sunday defended his decision not to specifically call out and condemn the white supremacists and neo-Nazis who gathered in Charlottesville this weekend and violently clashed with those who opposed their message.

In interviews on Sunday morning news shows, national security adviser H.R. McMaster and homeland security adviser Tom Bossert echoed the vague comments that the president made in a statement at his private golf club in New Jersey on Saturday, signaling that Trump does not plan to heed calls from fellow Republicans to bluntly confront and condemn white supremacy.

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“Nothing changes”: Republicans in Congress will stick with Trump, even after Charlottesville

  “Nothing changes”: Republicans in Congress will stick with Trump, even after Charlottesville After two days of failing to denounce white supremacy following a violent rally in Charlottesville on Saturday, President Trump answered outraged calls from his own party: He condemned racist hate groups by name. Those comments, read from prepared text on Monday in the White House, will almost certainly be sufficient to avoid any real damage to Trump’s legislative proposals. And as far as insiders on Capitol Hill can see, Trump’s amended comments seem to be enough for Republican lawmakers to move forward as if this were any other White House dust-up — and to continue pushing for policy goals they share with the president. “It seems like what Congress is focused on is what Congress has always been focused on,” a conservative House aide said, speaking on condition of anonymity: moving the legislative agenda on health care and tax reform that GOP members have campaigned on for years. On Saturday, a Nazi sympathizer at a white supremacy rally in Charlottesville, Virginia — whose mother identified as a Trump supporter — rammed his car into a crowd of anti-racism counterprotesters, killing one and injuring more than a dozen. In the immediate aftermath, Trump refused to condemn white supremacy specifically, prompting angry calls from Republican lawmakers. “Mr. President — we must call evil by its name. These were white supremacists and this was domestic terrorism,” Sen. Cory Gardner (R-CO) tweeted. Sen.

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Historically, ignoring white supremacy has not been a winning strategy. The Klan has a really long and intimate history with those statues. SJ: Talk a little bit about the things that you want to see changed down in Charlottesville , the organizing beyond just confronting the right.

“What the president did is he called out anyone, anyone who is responsible for fomenting this kind of bigotry, hatred, racism and violence,” McMaster said on ABC's “This Week” on Sunday morning. “I think the president was very clear on that.”

When asked whether this was an act of domestic terrorism, McMaster said, “Anytime that you commit an attack against people to incite fear, it is terrorism.”

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Virginia Democrat: Why is Trump 'unwilling' to call out white supremacy?

  Virginia Democrat: Why is Trump 'unwilling' to call out white supremacy? Sen. Tim Kaine (D-Va.) called out President Trump on Sunday for being "unwilling" to call out and repudiate white supremacists."What the president did this week was suggesting there was some moral equivalence in Charlottesville. And that is outrageous," Kaine told host John Dickerson on CBS' "Face The Nation.

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On CNN, Bossert repeatedly praised the president for not naming the groups that were involved and instead focusing on an overarching call for Americans to love one another. He said that people “on both sides” showed up in Charlottesville “looking for trouble” and that he won't assign blame for the death of a counterprotester on either group, although he said the president would like to see “swift justice” for the victim. After repeated questioning, Bossert did say that he personally condemns “white supremacists and Nazi groups that espouse this sort of terrorism and exclusion.” He did not say whether the president agrees with him on that.

“The president not only condemned the violence and stood up at a time and a moment when calm was necessary and didn't dignify the names of these groups of people, but rather addressed the fundamental issue,” Bossert said on CNN's “State of the Union.” “And so … what you need to focus on is the rest of his statement.”

Bossert repeatedly questioned host Jake Tapper on why he was even asking these questions, at one point saying: “I guess you're going to continue to press on the words he didn't say, but I'd like you to focus for just a moment on the rest of the statement that he did say.”

While Bossert acknowledged that white supremacy is a problem in the country, he quickly shifted to talking about the greater threat of “a global jihadi terrorist problem.” This is a common tactic used by the Trump administration, which considered refocusing the government's Countering Violent Extremism program on Islamist groups, not white supremacists, and has proposed slashing funding for the program. A recent study found that between 2008 and 2016, the number of designated terrorist attacks on U.S. soil carried out by right-wing extremist groups, including white supremacists, outnumbered those carried out by Islamists by 2 to 1.

Paul Ryan Affirms 'There Are No Sides' To White Supremacy, But Still Won't Call Out Trump

  Paul Ryan Affirms 'There Are No Sides' To White Supremacy, But Still Won't Call Out Trump House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) on Monday responded more forcefully to President Donald Trump’s defense of the white supremacist and neo-Nazi groups that precipitated this month’s violence in Charlottesville, Virginia, while still declining to denounce Trump directly. In a lengthy statement, released ahead of a CNN town hall Monday night, Ryan affirmed that “there are no sides,” alluding to Trump blaming “both sides” for the violence in Charlottesville, which was incited by a rally organized by white supremacist groups.

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In his statement, Trump said, “We condemn in the strongest possible terms this egregious display of hatred, bigotry and violence on many sides.” He then added for emphasis: “On many sides.”

  White House doubles down on Trump’s Charlottesville comments, ignores calls to directly confront white supremacy © Alex Wong/Getty Images

Numerous Republicans and Democrats have criticized the usually blunt-speaking president for reacting to the violence and racism in Charlottesville in such vague terms, for placing equal blame on the counterprotesters and for not specifically condemning the white supremacists involved.

Sens. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) and Cory Gardner (R-Colo.) urged the president to use the words “white supremacists” and to label what happened Saturday as a terrorist attack. House Speaker Paul D. Ryan (R-Wis.) declared that “white supremacy is a scourge” that “must be confronted and defeated.” Sen. Orrin G. Hatch (R-Utah) tweeted, “We should call evil by its name. My brother didn’t give his life fighting Hitler for Nazi ideas to go unchallenged here at home.”

Charlottesville Mayor Michael Signer (D) has directly blamed Trump for the explosion of hate in his city this weekend, and he continued to do so Sunday in an interview with CNN. He accused Trump of intentionally courting white supremacists, nationalists and anti-Semitic groups on the campaign trail, and he criticized the president for not condemning these groups.

“This is not hard. There's two words that need to be said over and over again: domestic terrorism and white supremacy,” Signer said. “That is exactly what we saw on display this weekend, and we just aren't seeing leadership from the White House.”

Gardner also appeared on “State of the Union” on Sunday and urged the president to speak out directly on the issue today and “call this white supremacism, white nationalism evil.” He said the president should do so with the same kind of conviction that he has had in “naming terrorism around the globe as evil.” Gardner declined to theorize on why Trump is so hesitant to speak up in specific terms.

“This is not a time for vagaries, this isn’t a time for innuendo or to allow room to be read between the lines, this is a time to lay blame,” Gardner said.

The senator added that Trump should not fear any political blowback for doing so.

“They’re not a part of anybody’s base, they’re not a part of this country,” he said. “Call it for what it is. It’s hatred, it’s bigotry. We don’t want them in our base, they shouldn’t be in a base, we shouldn’t call them part of a base.”

Sen. Lindsey O. Graham (R-S.C.) said on “Fox News Sunday” that Trump needs to “correct the record here.”

“These groups seem to believe they have a friend in Donald Trump in the White House, and I would urge the president to dissuade that,” Graham said.

Members of the president's own administration and some of his close allies also are breaking with his messaging. Trump's eldest daughter, Ivanka Trump, took to Twitter on Sunday morning to write two short messages: “There should be no place in society for racism, white supremacy and neo-nazis,” and “We must all come together as Americans — and be one country UNITED. #Charlottesville.”

Anthony Scaramucci, the president's former communications director, said on ABC's “This Week” that he would not have recommended that the president say what he did Saturday.

“I think he needed to be much harsher as it related to the white supremacists and the nature of that,” said Scaramucci, whose White House stint lasted only 10 days.

He later added that it's difficult for White House aides to change the president and his way of thinking, but that those around him need to give “direct advice, to be blunt with him.”

“He likes doing the opposite of what the media thinks he’s gonna do,” Scaramucci said. “I think he’s also of the impression that there’s hatred on all sides, but I disagree with it.”

Scaramucci said Trump “has to move away from that sort of Bannon-bart nonsense” and “move more to the mainstream” way of thinking that is embraced by most moderate Republicans and independents.

Demirjian reported from Washington. John Wagner and Janell Ross in Washington contributed to this report.

Paul Ryan Affirms 'There Are No Sides' To White Supremacy, But Still Won't Call Out Trump .
House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) on Monday responded more forcefully to President Donald Trump’s defense of the white supremacist and neo-Nazi groups that precipitated this month’s violence in Charlottesville, Virginia, while still declining to denounce Trump directly. In a lengthy statement, released ahead of a CNN town hall Monday night, Ryan affirmed that “there are no sides,” alluding to Trump blaming “both sides” for the violence in Charlottesville, which was incited by a rally organized by white supremacist groups.

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