Politics Paul Ryan Affirms 'There Are No Sides' To White Supremacy, But Still Won't Call Out Trump

00:21  22 august  2017
00:21  22 august  2017 Source:   HuffPost

Ryan: 'White supremacy is a scourge'

  Ryan: 'White supremacy is a scourge' House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) denounced white supremacy in the wake of the racially charged clashes in Charlottesville on Saturday. "Our hearts are with today's victims. White supremacy is a scourge. This hate and its terrorism must be confronted and defeated," Ryan said on Twitter. Our hearts are with today's victims. White supremacy is a sco urge. This hate and its terrorism must be confronted and defeated," Ryan said on Twitter. Our hearts are with today's vic urge. This hate and its terrorism must be confronted and defeated.

“We must be clear,” Ryan tweeted. “ White supremacy is repulsive. Trump is calling those protesters the “alt-left.” Trump initially criticized the violence on many sides , rather than singling out the white supremacists .

error:db connection problem. Trump fires White House communications director Anthony Scaramucci.

House Speaker Paul Ryan, right, released a statement condemning white supremacists, but not calling out statements on the matter from President Donald Trump.© Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images House Speaker Paul Ryan, right, released a statement condemning white supremacists, but not calling out statements on the matter from President Donald Trump. WASHINGTON ― House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) on Monday responded more forcefully to President Donald Trump’s defense of the white supremacist and neo-Nazi groups that precipitated this month’s violence in Charlottesville, Virginia, while still declining to denounce Trump directly.

In a lengthy statement, released ahead of a CNN town hall Monday night, Ryan affirmed that “there are no sides,” alluding to Trump blaming “both sides” for the violence in Charlottesville, which was incited by a rally organized by white supremacist groups.

“Nothing changes”: Republicans in Congress will stick with Trump, even after Charlottesville

  “Nothing changes”: Republicans in Congress will stick with Trump, even after Charlottesville After two days of failing to denounce white supremacy following a violent rally in Charlottesville on Saturday, President Trump answered outraged calls from his own party: He condemned racist hate groups by name. Those comments, read from prepared text on Monday in the White House, will almost certainly be sufficient to avoid any real damage to Trump’s legislative proposals. And as far as insiders on Capitol Hill can see, Trump’s amended comments seem to be enough for Republican lawmakers to move forward as if this were any other White House dust-up — and to continue pushing for policy goals they share with the president. “It seems like what Congress is focused on is what Congress has always been focused on,” a conservative House aide said, speaking on condition of anonymity: moving the legislative agenda on health care and tax reform that GOP members have campaigned on for years. On Saturday, a Nazi sympathizer at a white supremacy rally in Charlottesville, Virginia — whose mother identified as a Trump supporter — rammed his car into a crowd of anti-racism counterprotesters, killing one and injuring more than a dozen. In the immediate aftermath, Trump refused to condemn white supremacy specifically, prompting angry calls from Republican lawmakers. “Mr. President — we must call evil by its name. These were white supremacists and this was domestic terrorism,” Sen. Cory Gardner (R-CO) tweeted. Sen.

House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-WI) on Monday condemned white nationalists and declared that there were “ no sides ” to the violence at a rally earlier this month in Charlottesville, Virginia. Last week, the speaker wrote that “ white supremacy is repulsive” shortly after Trump ’s off-the-rails press

“We must be clear,” Ryan tweeted. “ White supremacy is repulsive. Trump initially criticized the violence on many sides , rather than singling out the white supremacists .

Calling the events “a test of our moral clarity,” the House speaker attempted to present a contrast to Trump’s equivocation on the groups.

“There is no other argument. We will not tolerate this hateful ideology in our society,” Ryan said.

“That is why we all need to make clear there is no moral relativism when it comes to neo-Nazis. We cannot allow the slightest ambiguity on such a fundamental question,” he continued.

According to Ryan, “the immediate condemnations from left, right, and center affirmed that there is no confusion about right and wrong here.”

Yet Trump took more than 48 hours to call out the white supremacist, Ku Klux Klan and neo-Nazi groups.

Politicians of both parties widely condemned Trump’s response to the violence in Charlottesville, with a growing number of GOP lawmakers questioning Trump’s leadership and character. However, Ryan and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) issued far more tempered statements that denounced the violence ― but didn’t refer to Trump directly.

Trump went off-script with 'many sides' remark: report

  Trump went off-script with 'many sides' remark: report President Trump reportedly ad-libbed part of his controversial statement Saturday in response to the violent clashes in Charlottesville, Va. Two White House officials told ABC News the president went off script in his comments, in which he blamed "many sides" for the violence, as opposed to specifically singling out white nationalists and the far right."Those were his own words," one senior White House official said.The official said those words "were not" prepared for the president.

Trump apparently declined to call out white supremacists , neo-Nazis because he focused on 'law and order'. Burkina Faso's communications minister said eight people were wounded and while police killed at least three of the attackers, there are still people left inside the building.

Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) called white supremacy “repulsive” in a tweet Tuesday just hours after President Trump doubled down on his claim that “many sides ” are to blame for violence in Charlottesville, Va., over the weekend.

Following Trump’s combative press conference Tuesday, in which he defended the protesters as “very fine people,” Ryan responded on Twitter, saying that “there can be no moral ambiguity.”

On Thursday, two days after Trump’s remarks, McConnell was reportedly “upset” about the president, but then issued a similarly standard statement, which made no mention of Trump.

This article originally appeared on HuffPost.

Ten-day march from Charlottesville to DC to start Monday .
Activists are set to start a 10-day march from Charlottesville, Virginia to Washington, D.C. on Monday to confront white supremacy and demand President Trump's removal from office."The March to Confront White Supremacy," is set to start in Charlottesville Monday, Aug. 28 and end in Washington, D.C. on Wednesday, Sept. 6. Organizers say the march will be followed by an occupation of Washington, D.C. with daily nonviolent demonstrations.

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