Politics Action to Protect Young Immigrants Already Stumbles in Congress

03:05  13 september  2017
03:05  13 september  2017 Source:   The New York Times

Here's What You Need to Know About DACA

  Here's What You Need to Know About DACA The end of the Deferred Action for Child Arrivals, or DACA, initiative is sure to be intensely debated across the country. Here's what you need to know about the program. What exactly is DACA?President Barack Obama created DACA through a 2012 executive order. The program has allowed hundreds of thousands of young people who were brought to the United States illegally as children to remain in the country. Applicants cannot have serious criminal histories, and must have arrived in the U.S. before 2007, when they were under the age of 16. DACA recipients can live and work legally in the U.S.

The New York Times. Politics| Action to Protect Young Immigrants Already Stumbles in Congress . Search. But Mr. Trump has played a role in complicating efforts to pass stand-alone legislation protecting such immigrants , known as the Dream Act.

Clinton is calling on Congress to act immediately to protect the young immigrants ' status. The Trump administration announced Tuesday it's phasing out the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program and leaving it to Congress to come up with an alternative.

Representative Mike Coffman, Republican of Colorado, is a top target for Democrats in next year’s midterm elections and represents a heavily Latino district.© Nick Cote for The New York Times Representative Mike Coffman, Republican of Colorado, is a top target for Democrats in next year’s midterm elections and represents a heavily Latino district.

WASHINGTON — A week after concerned Republicans promised quick work to shield young, undocumented immigrants from President Trump’s decision to end their federal protections, lawmakers have tied themselves in knots trying to figure out how to proceed — with only six months to find a way forward.

If anything, advocates for immigrants brought to this country as children may have lost ground.

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Trump says he will revisit DACA decision if lawmakers don't act

  Trump says he will revisit DACA decision if lawmakers don't act President Trump said Tuesday that he would revisit his decision to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program if lawmakers are unable to pass legislation on the matter in the next six months. "Congress now has 6 months to legalize DACA (something the Obama Administration was unable to do). If they can't, I will revisit this issue!" he wrote on Twitter. "Congress now has 6 months to legalize DACA (something the Obama Administration was unable to do). If they can't, I will revisit this issue!" he wrote on Twitter.

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the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. Ask Congress now to pass the BRIDGE Act and provide relief to undocumented young people. I Urge You to Support the BRIDGE Act and Protect Young Immigrants .

Representative Mike Coffman, Republican of Colorado, pulled back a petition he had initiated to force the House to take up legislation to protect so-called Dreamers. A Senate Judiciary Committee hearing into the issue was canceled this week. And Representative Bob Goodlatte of Virginia, chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, said he would not move on any such legislation before he addressed criminal alien gangs and border security.

“With all the other things going on right now, it’s kind of put on the back burner,” Mr. Coffman conceded.

When Mr. Trump announced last week that he would end the Obama-era Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program in six months, that time frame was supposed to light a fire under Congress. Instead, it may have hit the snooze button, Mr. Coffman said.

Graham, Durbin call for action on DREAM Act by end of September

  Graham, Durbin call for action on DREAM Act by end of September "We're going to take care of those kids," Sen. Lindsey Graham said.The call to action came after the Trump administration announced Tuesday that it would end the Obama-era Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, which shields immigrants brought to the country illegally as children from deportation.

Clinton is calling on Congress to act immediately to protect the young immigrants ' status. The Trump administration announced Tuesday it's phasing out the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program and leaving it to Congress to come up with an alternative.

Clinton is calling on Congress to act immediately to protect the young immigrants ' status. The Trump administration announced Tuesday it's phasing out the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program and leaving it to Congress to come up with an alternative.

“He could have done an immediate phase out,” he said. “That would really put pressure on Congress to put DACA right on the top of the agenda. But in giving Congress six months, with all the other things going on right now, the debt limit, the appropriations, tax reform, it’s not certainly on the top of the agenda right now.”

Supporters of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program at Capitol Hill in Washington last week.© Tom Brenner/The New York Times Supporters of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program at Capitol Hill in Washington last week.

Mr. Coffman, a top target for Democrats in next year’s midterm elections, had planned to circulate a “discharge petition” to force a vote on a three-year extension of DACA that he wrote with Representative Luis V. Gutiérrez, Democrat of Illinois. But he called off the action after Speaker Paul D. Ryan said he wanted a broader immigration measure that twinned enhanced border security measures with legalization for young immigrants.

Trump to dine with Schumer and Pelosi, talk DACA

  Trump to dine with Schumer and Pelosi, talk DACA The top two Democrats on Capitol Hill will join President Donald Trump for dinner Wednesday night at the White House, the latest in a series of overtures Trump has made to Democrats in the last week. Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi are expected to discuss protections for young undocumented immigrants brought to the US as children, stabilizing the health care markets and other legislative deadlines that will quickly creep up on Capitol Hill this fall, two people familiar with the plans told CNN.One person familiar with the planning said the dinner was set up at Trump's request.

Whoa there! Looks like you're already verified. If you still have trouble signing in, you probably need a new confirmation link email. Clinton is calling on Congress to act immediately to protect the young immigrants ' status.

Clinton is calling on Congress to act immediately to protect the young immigrants ' status. The Trump administration announced Tuesday it's phasing out the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program and leaving it to Congress to come up with an alternative.

The Senate Judiciary Committee had planned to hold a hearing on DACA on Wednesday but postponed the meeting at the request of the Trump administration, according to a congressional aide who was not authorized to discuss the meeting. Representative Bob Goodlatte of Virginia, the House Judiciary Committee chairman, said this week that he would hold no DACA hearings until border security legislation is drafted.

Instead, this week the House will take up the Criminal Alien Gang Member Removal Act, aimed at MS-13 and other immigrant gangs, and the Legal Workforce Act to expand electronic worker verification efforts. Mr. Goodlatte said he would follow those bills with legislation dealing with immigrant agricultural workers.

“We are happy to have discussions with anybody who wants to talk about what we need to do with DACA, but I would say DACA is at the end of that list, not at the beginning,” said Mr. Goodlatte in an interview. “We can’t fix the DACA problem without fixing all of the issues that led to the underlying problem of illegal immigration in the first place.”

The clock is ticking on DACA. Here’s how young immigrants and their advocates are fighting back.

  The clock is ticking on DACA. Here’s how young immigrants and their advocates are fighting back. Those at risk of losing their protected status are rushing to renew permits and pushing for laws to allow them to remain in the United States.In hurricane-ravaged Houston, lawyers are clearing their calendars to help immigrants fill out the forms. In Maryland and Virginia, advocates are holding emergency meetings and recruiting volunteers. Nationwide, immigrants and nonprofits are raising money online to help cover the $495 renewal fees.

Clinton is calling on Congress to act immediately to protect the young immigrants ' status. The Trump administration announced Tuesday it's phasing out the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program and leaving it to Congress to come up with an alternative.

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That leisurely attitude may not have been what the president had in mind when he wrote on Twitter last Thursday, “For all of those (DACA) that are concerned about your status during the 6 month period, you have nothing to worry about.” But Mr. Trump has played a role in complicating efforts to pass stand-alone legislation protecting such immigrants, known as the Dream Act.

In a meeting at the White House last week, Mr. Trump pressed Senator Chuck Schumer of New York, the Democratic leader, for 15 minutes about paring funding for a border wall with protections for Dreamers, according to a person familiar with the meeting, who spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not cleared to discuss internal deliberations. Both Mr. Schumer and Representative Nancy Pelosi of California, the House Democratic leader, rejected the deal.

On Tuesday, Marc Short, the White House legislative affairs director, told reporters that Mr. Trump was unlikely to stand by his wall-funding demand, though he said the administration is still “interested in getting border security.”

“I don’t want us to bind ourselves into a construct that makes reaching a conclusion on DACA impossible,” Mr. Short said.

Representative Michelle Lujan Grisham, Democrat of New Mexico and chairwoman of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus Chair, said she is still hopeful that Americans will rally around the 800,000 young immigrants facing deportation.

Democratic lawmakers arrested outside Trump Tower for DACA protest

  Democratic lawmakers arrested outside Trump Tower for DACA protest Three Hispanic House Democrats were arrested outside Trump Tower on Tuesday during a protest to demand action on shielding young undocumented immigrants from deportation.Democratic Reps. Luis Gutierrez (Ill.), Ra l Grijalva (Ariz.) and Adrian o Espaillat (N.Y.) were all arrested while rallying outside Trump's Manhattan residence with advocacy groups, aides confirmed. The lawmakers and advocacy groups are pressing Trump to work with Congress to pass a "clean" version of the DREAM Act granting undocumented immigrants brought to the U.S.

So despite Ryan’s personal commitment on the issue and his comments in favor of the young immigrants , action to protect them may be unlikely in the House — absent intense lobbying from President Trump. Politics. President Trump vows to revisit DACA if Congress stumbles .

Clinton is calling on Congress to act immediately to protect the young immigrants ' status. The Trump administration announced Tuesday it's phasing out the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program and leaving it to Congress to come up with an alternative.

“They are panicked and we understand that real, raw fear,” she said. “I can’t even deal with the possibility that we fail because I know what’s at stake.”

Representative Steny Hoyer of Maryland, the Democratic whip, was cautious. “I wouldn’t say that I’m confident about Republicans putting it on the floor,” he said. “But I’m hopeful, and we’ve had positive discussions.”

Mr. Coffman did say he is prepared to sign a Democratic petition to force a vote on the Dream Act — a rare overture to the minority party. But with 194 members, Democrats are going to need quite a few Republicans to get the 218 signatures they need, and even Republicans with large Latino populations in their districts are reluctant.

Representative Jeff Denham, Republican of California, said he does not plan to sign the Dream Act discharge petition.

Ms. Pelosi and Mr. Schumer are maneuvering to get the Dream Act attached to the fiscal deal that will have to be struck in December to keep the government funded through an omnibus spending bill.

“Republicans will be unable to pass an omnibus in December depending on Republican votes alone,” Ms. Pelosi said in a statement. “That increases Democrats’ leverage.”

But any hope of bipartisan momentum seems to be dissipating.

“Whether this six month opportunity gets across the goal line remains to be seen. I wouldn’t place a bet,” said Representative Bennie G. Thompson of Mississippi, the top Democrat on the House Homeland Security Committee.

Trump Tells Congress to Act on 'Dreamers' .
Trump signaled Tuesday he'd be moving forward with a delayed end for DACA that would provide Congress with a window to act on the Obama-era program."Congress, get ready to do your job - DACA!" Trump tweeted Tuesday morning as lawmakers were returning after their August break.

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