Politics Senator Tim Scott says Trump has "obviously reflected" since Charlottesville

23:46  13 september  2017
23:46  13 september  2017 Source:   CBS News

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Politics. Tim Scott says Trump has " reflected " on Charlottes Sen . Tim Scott believes President Trump has had a chance to reflect on the controversial comments he made after the deadly white nationalist rally last month in Charlottesville , Virginia, and he says that Mr. Trump told him the

no connect. Politics In his own words: President Trump on Charlottesville protest.

Sen. Tim Scott believes President Trump has had a chance to reflect on the controversial comments he made after the deadly white nationalist rally last month in Charlottesville, Virginia, and he says that Mr. Trump told him the perception of his remarks wasn't "what he intended."

The black Republican from South Carolina gave an exclusive TV interview to CBS News Chief Congressional Correspondent Nancy Cordes after meeting with Mr. Trump and Vice President Mike Pence on Wednesday, in a discussion that touched on issues of race, discrimination and opportunity in America. Scott attracted both praise and criticism when he said Mr. Trump "compromised" his "moral authority" in blaming "both sides" for violence in Charlottesville, saying there were "very fine people" among the white nationalist protesters. After that critique, Scott said the White House called him, asking what could be done in light of his critiques. The result, at least a part of it, was Wednesday's meeting.

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Trump 's moral authority to lead compromised: Sen . Scott . Republican Senator Tim Scott says President Donald Trump ’s response to the racist violence in Charlottesville has compromised his moral authority to lead the United States.

Republican senator says Trump 's Charlottesville response compromises the president's 'moral authority' to lead. More: charlottesville Donald Trump GOP Tim Scott . facebook twitter pinterest email copy link.

Cordes asked Scott if Mr. Trump felt remorse over his remarks.

"He's obviously reflected on what he has said, on his intentions and the perception of those comments," Scott said. "I'll let him discuss how he feels about it, but he was certainly very clear that the perception that he received on his comments was not exactly what he intended with those comments."

Cordes asked Scott what he wanted the president to understand about how people of color felt about the president's comments.

tim scott interview: 091317-scott-intv001-001-mp4-14-03-05-24-still002.jpg© cbs news 091317-scott-intv001-001-mp4-14-03-05-24-still002.jpg

"What I wanted to get out of the conversation was a focus on fairness and opportunity," Scott said. "Most people of color and frankly all Americans, want to be treated fairly in this nation, and they want access to opportunities."

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Sen . Tim Scott said Thursday that President Trump had lost "moral authority" in the aftermath of the weekend violence in Charlottesville , Va., according to a report. "I'm not going to defend the indefensible," the South Carolina Republican told Vice News

South Carolina Senator Tim Scott admonishes Trump for his bungled response to events in Charlottesville , VA, says it will be hard for Trump to lead. He added that the division has grown larger in the months since Trump assumed the presidency.

Watch: Sen. Tim Scott: "It's not what the president says next, it's what he does"

When Scott initially criticized Mr. Trump's handle on "moral authority," he hoped Mr. Trump would take this chance to meet with people of different backgrounds who have faced discrimination.

"This would be an opportunity for him to become better educated and acquainted with the living history of so many folks, from John Lewis to my mother and so many others who have gone through a very painful part of the history of this country, so that when he acts, when he responds, and when he speaks, he's not reading the words that are so positive that he's breathing the very air that brings him to a different conclusion, a conclusion that comes from the wells of his heart," Scott told CBS News' "Face the Nation" last month.

Scott's meeting with Mr. Trump comes as the House and Senate this week passed a resolution rejecting white nationalists, white supremacists, neo-Nazis and other groups, and urging Mr. Trump to do the same, in light of the Charlottesville violence. The resolution is headed to Mr. Trump's desk for him to sign.

Cordes' interview with Scott will air Wednesday night on "CBS Evening News."

Tarps covering Confederate statues are being ripped down .
Officials in Charlottesville, Virginia, are trying to stop people from ripping down tarps that cover statues of Confederate generals. (AP Photo/Steve Helber, File) CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. — Officials in Charlottesville, Virginia, are trying to stop people from ripping down tarps that cover st The Daily Progress reported Tuesday that the city has placed plastic fencing around the monuments to Robert E. Lee and Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson. The tarps have been ripped down six times.The coverings are a gesture of mourning for Heather Heyer. She was killed Aug.

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