Politics Romney says he believes Roy Moore's accuser, calls on Senate candidate to step aside

19:05  10 november  2017
19:05  10 november  2017 Source:   Business Insider

If allegations against Moore are true, he should step aside, White House says

  If allegations against Moore are true, he should step aside, White House says President Donald Trump thinks if the allegations of sexual misconduct with teens against an Alabama Senate candidate are true, he should withdraw from his race, the White House said Friday. But Trump's statement also couched his assertion by noting the allegations against Roy Moore are decades old. In a statement released as Trump was flying from Beijing to Da Nang, Vietnam, White House press secretary Sarah Sanders said: "Like most Americans, the President believes we cannot allow a mere allegation, in this case one from many years ago, to destroy a person's life.

The allegations against Roy Moore are deeply disturbing and disqualifying. He should immediately step aside and allow the people of Alabama to elect a candidate they can be proud of. Tags: Alabama girls misconduct Mitt Romney roy moore Senate sexual teenager trump.

“If these allegations are true, Roy Moore should step aside for all the obvious reasons,” Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, who backed Moore ’ s opponent in the Republican primary, said Thursday.

Mitt Romney wearing a suit and tie: On Twitter, Mitt Romney spoke out about the shocking allegations against Roy Moore. © AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster On Twitter, Mitt Romney spoke out about the shocking allegations against Roy Moore. Mitt Romney, the former Republican presidential nominee and Massachusetts governor, weighed in on Friday on the sexual misconduct allegations facing Republican Senate nominee Roy Moore, urging him to drop out of the race.

"Innocent until proven guilty is for criminal convictions, not elections. I believe Leigh Corfman. Her account is too serious to ignore," Romney wrote on Twitter. "Moore is unfit for office and should step aside."

Corfman alleged in a Washington Post article published Thursday that Moore had initiated a sexual encounter with her when she was 14 and he was in his 32.

Alabama secretary of state: I would still vote for Roy Moore

  Alabama secretary of state: I would still vote for Roy Moore Alabama Secretary of State John Merrill said that as of Tuesday, he would still vote for Roy Moore unless the mounting sex allegations against the Republican Senate candidate were proven true. "As of today, with the information that's been introduced to me, and if these charges are not proven to be true, then I would continue to support and vote for Judge Moore," Merrill said on CNN's "New Day."Moore has been accused of sexual misconduct by at least five women in the past week.

Mitt Romney said Friday he believes one of the women who accused Roy Moore of sexual John McCain, R-Ariz., also called on Moore to step aside , without equivocating. Moore disputed the accounts of his accusers , and called the story “fake news” and “intentional defamation.”

The White House reacted Friday to a series of sexual misconduct allegations leveled against Republican Senate candidate Judge Roy Moore , saying that President Donald Trump believes if they are proven true then Moore should " step aside ."

Corfman was one of four women quoted in the Post's story who said Moore pursued relationships with them when they were teenagers and he was in his 30s.

The allegations have rattled the Alabama race, prompting a slew of GOP senators, including Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, to publicly urge Moore to drop out of the election if the accusations are true.

The "if true" qualifier that many senators have used in their statements denouncing Moore has prompted speculation over how the women's allegations can be further proven, and what Republicans should do about Moore's candidacy if such proof is impossible to obtain.

Notably, Sen. John McCain, of Arizona, was one of the few Republicans who issued a statement that did not express doubt over whether the accusations were true, and called upon Moore to immediately drop out.

Poll: Large majority believes Moore should drop out

  Poll: Large majority believes Moore should drop out Americans believe by a nearly three-to-one margin that Alabama Republican Roy Moore should drop out of the race for the state's Senate seat, according to a new poll released Tuesday. Sixty-three percent of Americans say that Moore should step aside amid mounting allegations of sexual misconduct with teenage girls, according to the Quinnipiac University poll. Only 23 percent surveyed believe he should stay in the race."Roy Moore has to go, say American voters," said Tim Mallow, assistant director of the Quinnipiac survey. "But the only voters who matter are in Alabama.

Mitch McConnell and others called on Alabama Senate candidate Roy Moore to step aside follow a bombshell report in the Washington Post. “If these allegations are true, he must step aside ,” McConnell said in a statement Thursday afternoon.

Several Republican senators said Thursday that Alabama Senate candidate Roy Moore should abandon the race if reports are true that he sexually pursued teenage girls when he was in his 30 s . "If these allegations are true, he must step aside ," McConnell said .

"The allegations against Roy Moore are deeply disturbing and disqualifying," he said in a statement. "He should immediately step aside and allow the people of Alabama to elect a candidate they can be proud of."

GOP officials in Alabama, meanwhile, have remained supportive of Moore, with some questioning whether the women's accounts are true, and others saying they will continue to support Moore's candidacy even if they are.

Moore has denied the allegations and accused the Post and the Democratic Party of waging a "desperate political attack" against him.


How Roy Moore could flip deep-red Alabama .
As allegations of sexual misconduct against Roy Moore multiply and polls suggest he could lose the senate race, a closer look at how Alabama voters view Moore.But a look at Moore's last general election in the state shows its voters may be a bit more complicated than that - and December's senate race could be as well.

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