Politics House passes bill to curb presidential pensions

01:03  14 november  2017
01:03  14 november  2017 Source:   The Hill

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The bill , authored by Rep. Jody Hice, R-Ga., modifies similar legislation passed in 2016 that former President Barack Obama vetoed. “Despite the millions of dollars offered by these lucrative deals, American taxpayers continue to foot the bill for yearly pensions , staff salaries, and office space.

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House passes bill to curb presidential pensions © Provided by The Hill House passes bill to curb presidential pensions The House easily passed legislation on Monday to reduce the pensions and federal benefits provided to former presidents.

Before approving the bill by voice vote, lawmakers expressed agreement that modern-day former presidents don't need financial assistance from the government if they already earn salaries in the millions.

Under a law established in 1958, former presidents are eligible for an annual six-figure pension, plus funds for staff salaries, office space and other expenses.

Rep. Jody Hice (R-Ga.), the author of the bill, questioned the necessity of providing funds for former presidents, who can make millions of dollars from book deals and speaking engagements.

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House Oversight Chair Jason Chaffetz (R-UT) on Wednesday said that he will re-introduce a bill vetoed by President Barack Obama that would impose limits on presidential pensions now that Obama has reportedly accepted 0,000 for a speech.

The House passed legislation this week that would restructure the annual pensions and personal allowances paid to former presidents . The bill , known as the Presidential Allowance Modernization Act (H.R. 1777), was introduced by Rep.

"Because of these opportunities, it's no longer necessary to provide taxpayer-funded support to former presidents in the same way as envisioned in 1958," Hice said during House floor debate.

Benefits for former presidents cost taxpayers $2.84 million in fiscal year 2017, according to Hice's office.

Yet the lucrative opportunities for former presidents and their spouses are well documented.

For example, former President Clinton - as well as his wife, former first lady Hillary Clinton -- earned an average of $210,795 for each paid speech from the time he left office in 2001 until her 2016 campaign launch, according to a CNN analysis.

Former President Obama and former first lady Michelle Obama also inked book deals that were reportedly in the tens of millions of dollars.

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Utah representative Chaffetz plans to reintroduce a 2016 bill to the House that would cap presidential pensions at 0,000, with an additional 0,000 in expenses, USA Today reported. USA Today reported: Last year, then- president Barack Obama vetoed a bill that would have curbed the

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The legislation would reduce the presidential pension by about $4,000 to $200,000 per year and cap the budget for each former president's office and staff expenses to $500,000 annually.

Funds available for presidential office expenses would be reduced for every dollar a former president earns over $400,000. Eventually, the staff and office budgets would be phased out to $350,000 in six years and $250,000 in 10 years.

Former presidents and their families would still receive the same amount of security provided by the government as they do today.

The House and Senate sent similar legislation to then-President Obama's desk in 2016. But Obama vetoed the measure out of concern it would have unintended consequences by forcing out presidential office staffers without a transition period and possibly affecting government operations for former presidents' security.

Obama wrote in a message to lawmakers that he would sign the bill into law if Congress "returns the bill having appropriately addressed these concerns." However, lawmakers did not act in time before Obama left office in January.

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