Politics House passes $692B defense policy bill

00:51  15 november  2017
00:51  15 november  2017 Source:   The Hill

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The House on Friday overwhelmingly passed a wide-ranging, 6.5 billion defense policy bill that goes far above President Trump’s budget request. Lawmakers voted 344-81 on the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA)

The House on Friday easily passed this year’s annual defense policy bill with bipartisan support in a 375-34 vote. Just In Trump facing pressure to roll back Obama labor policies .

House passes $692B defense policy bill © Provided by The Hill House passes $692B defense policy bill The House easily passed Tuesday this year's $692 billion defense policy bill.

The House voted 356-70 to approve the compromise National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) reached after House-Senate negotiations.

The compromise version would authorize $626.4 billion for the base defense budget and $65.7 billion for a war fund known as the Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO) account.

The money would go toward a 2.4 percent pay raise for troops, an increase of 20,000 active duty and reserve troops across the services, bulked up missile defense, increase operations in Afghanistan and more ships, planes and other equipment.

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The House passed on Friday a sweeping 6 billion defense policy bill that would exceed President Donald Trump's budget request and break through longstanding caps on national defense spending.

The House passed a sweeping 0 billion defense policy bill Wednesday, setting up an election-year standoff with the White House and the Senate over how best to fund the military in the final months of the Obama administration.

The bill is moving forward without an agreement in Congress to raise budget caps, which NDAA funding levels burst through.

That means some of the money authorized could end up not coming to fruition.

While praising their final product, Armed Services leaders on both sides of the aisles acknowledged a budget agreement is needed to back it up.

"As the world grew more dangerous, we cut our defense budget, and we added to burden borne by the men and women who serve us," House Armed Services Chairman Mac Thornberry (R-Texas) said. "We will not rebuild and fix our problems in one year or one bill even when it is matched by an appropriations bill, which this will need to be. But we can head in the right direction. That's what this conference report does."

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House lawmakers on Friday turned back a revolt from members upset over spending to pass the annual defense policy bill by a 269-151 vote. Most Democrats voted against the bill , but only eight Republicans defected.

Defense News House armed services panel overwhelmingly passes FY18 defense policy bill The House Rules Committee sent over 200 amendments to the floor this week — more than ever before for an NDAA, according to Thornberry.

Rep. Adam Smith (D-Wash.), ranking member of the committee, added that "this is a very good product.

"The challenge that we have going forward is what the chairman mentioned at the end there," he continued. "This bill ... goes roughly $80 billion over the budget caps. The bill can't do that on its own. Unless the budget caps are lifted and the appropriators pass the appropriations bill that doesn't happen. And we haven't made a lot of progress on that."

Outside of money, the bill makes a number of reforms to the military's space operations -- though it does not go as far as the House's original proposal for a Space Corps.

The bill would require the deputy secretary of Defense to contract a federally funded research and development corporation not associated with the Air Force to study the possibility of creating a Space Corps in the future.

It would also eliminate the principal adviser for space, the Defense Space Council and the deputy chief of staff for space operations, which lawmakers felt added unneeded layers of bureaucracy.

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The House easily passed a fiscal 2017 defense spending bill on Wednesday that would provide 7.9 billion for the Pentagon. The bill passed on a largely bipartisan vote, 371-48. Though many Democrats voted for the bill

Defying a veto threat from President Obama, the House on Friday passed a 2 billion defense bill in a 269-151 vote. "They did so without listing a single serious policy concern, letting politics come before national security," he said.

The bill would further give Air Force Space Command sole authority for organizing, training, and equipping all space forces within the Air Force.

"This year's bill takes the first step to fixing the broken national security space enterprise within the Air Force," said Rep. Mike Roger (R-Ala.), one of the chief backers of the Space Corps proposal. "It's a first step in long path to getting space right for the betterment of our warfighters. Hopefully over the coming year the Senate will focus on the chronic problems facing national security space and work with us to establish a separate Space Corps."

Despite Tuesday's overwhelming approval, one NDAA provision that remains controversial is language that would let the Pentagon sign off on unapproved medical devices and drugs for emergency use on the battlefield, rather than the FDA.

Because of that provision, the House approved a rule Tuesday that says the House clerk should not officially send the NDAA to the Senate until that chamber approves a separate House bill that narrows the provision.

In a joint statement, Thornberry and Smith said they support the compromise bill that would allow for expedited FDA approval in military medical emergencies, rather than giving the Pentagon approval authority.

"Although, we still have concerns about the impact it would have on our men and women in the field, we are content to let this compromise move forward in the hopes of improvement," Thornberry and Smith said in the joint statement. "To be clear, if the Armed Services Committee does not see evidence that the FDA is doing a better job meeting the needs of our troops, we will not hesitate to take action."


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