Technology The Navy's Horrifyingly Powerful Electromagnetic Railgun Might Be Coming to an End: Report

23:37  05 december  2017
23:37  05 december  2017 Source:   Gizmodo

Russian jet buzzes US Navy spy plane over Black Sea

  Russian jet buzzes US Navy spy plane over Black Sea A Russian Su-30 fighter jet buzzed a Navy reconnaissance plane flying in the Black Sea while conducting a routine patrol in international airspace Saturday, an official told Fox News.  The Russian jet crossed 50 feet in front of the Navy P-8 in full afterburner causing “violent turbulence,” the official said. The provocation lasted 24 minutes.It appears to be first known incident of this type since June, when an armed Russian fighter jet buzzed a U.S. Air Force reconnaissance aircraft over the Baltic Sea. The Russian Su-27 jet had air-to-air missiles under its wings and approached the U.S.

For years, we’ve been sharing videos and images showing the destructive power of the United State Navy ’ s electromagnetic railgun . But we might soon be seeing the last of those horrifying GIFs. Instead of using chemical combustion

For years, we've been sharing videos and images showing the destructive power of the United State Navy ' s electromagnetic railgun . But we might soon be seeing the last of those horrifying GIFs. Photo: Getty.

the inside of a building © Getty

For years, we’ve been sharing videos and images showing the destructive power of the United State Navy’s electromagnetic railgun. But we might soon be seeing the last of those horrifying GIFs.

Instead of using chemical combustion, the railgun fires projectiles using magnetic fields generated by enormous amount of energy. The superweapon is capable of shooting projectiles at 4,5000 miles per hour and hitting targets 100 miles away. According to military veteran news outlet Task & Purpose, the railgun, which has cost the Pentagon about $500 million since its inception in 2005, could be entering its twilight.

Navy releases new details about ship collision off South Korea's coastline

  Navy releases new details about ship collision off South Korea's coastline The cruiser's crew ordered a hard turn of 30 degrees first to the right and then to the left, before striking a South Korean vessel.The May 9 collision of the USS Lake Champlain, a guided-missile cruiser, was one of four major incidents for Navy ships in the Pacific this year, including two that left 17 sailors dead. The incidents have prompted broad scrutiny of the Navy’s seamanship, training, deployment schedules and oversight by senior officials.

The railgun has been heralded as the future of the Navy ’ s ship-destroying capabilities, but it comes with tremendous downsides as well. You may also like.

Railguns like the one the Navy has built trade chemical propellants like gunpowder for the sheer power of electricity, generating extremely strong magnetic fields to push a projectile down a set of rails and out the end of the barrel. It might not sound particularly efficient

The recently declassified Strategic Capabilities Office (SCO), which is tasked with helping usher new defense tech from testing facilities to combat, has reportedly shown less interest in the railgun than in other weapons under development. The waning enthusiasm might prevent the railgun from undergoing necessary tests that would allow the gun to be used in battle.

As the Navy has been developing the electromagnetic railgun, it has also been investing in hypervelocity projectile (HVP), a low-drag guided spike that the railgun could use for ammo. And now it seems the SCO has more interest in that ammo than the railgun it was originally built for.

HVP can also be fired using available powder weapons, and the Department of Defense might be interested in getting those projectiles combat-ready before the railgun makes it through years of testing. “SCO shifted the project’s focus to conventional powder guns, facilitating a faster transition of HVP technology to the warfighter,” Chris Sherwood, an SCO spokesperson, told Task & Purpose. “Our priority continues to be the HVP, which is reflected in the program’s budget.”

Last night of ‘Taps' draws a crowd to Pa. neighborhood

  Last night of ‘Taps' draws a crowd to Pa. neighborhood YORK, Pa. — Dozens of people gathered in the driveway of Navy Lt. Cmdr. Joshua Corney's home in Glen Rock on Thursday night and listened to his last playing of an amplified recording of "Taps." Corney shook hands and thanked people for coming. Some live in the borough, others traveled in from outside. They stood quietly in the drizzle as the military tribute played for 57 seconds.

Despite technological progress, the Office of Naval Research' s next-generation electromagnetic railgun may end up relegated to less fearsome But the recent CRS report suggests that the prototype weapons systems the Navy will eventually mount on Spearhead-class expeditionary fast

The electromagnetic railgun developed by BAE Systems for the U. S . Navy has a lot going for it. As Defense One reports , Raytheon Integrated Defense Systems is already A less powerful railgun still has all the advantages of being cheaper to fire and removing dangerous explosives from a ship.

According to Task & Purpose’s report, some researchers think the SCO’s prioritization of HVP means the railgun wont go through the necessary testing that would lead to its permanent installation on ships. One senior policymaker told Task & Purpose,“People at SCO don’t want to fund the railgun because they’re simply not buying it... They are imparting that priority on to Big Navy, which is pulling the money away from ONR [Office of Naval Research].”

But the ONR remains optimistic about the railgun—at least publicly. ONR spokesperson David Smalley told Task & Purpose that his organization plans to continue developing the railgun and has been making “great technical progress and there have been no show stoppers to date to prevent the Navy from having a railgun in the future.”

[Task & Purpose]

Navy ships in deadly crashes had lengthy training lapses .
Two US Navy destroyers involved in deadly collisions this year -- the USS John S. McCain and USS Fitzgerald -- had lengthy records of expired training certifications and some requirements had lapsed for more than two years, according to a new report obtained by CNN. New data submitted by the Government Accountability Office in response to questions from Rep. Joe Courtney, a Connecticut Democrat, confirmed CNN's previous reporting that both the McCain and Fitzgerald failed to fulfill key training qualifications ahead of the incidents that occurred this summer.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

This is interesting!