Technology Early Earth Took a Heavy Beating After the Moon Was Formed

02:36  08 december  2017
02:36  08 december  2017 Source:   Space.com

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Early Earth was bombarded by material that plunged all the way to its core or splashed off, requiring the planet to take more hits to deposit some of the elements present in its mantle. [How the Moon Formed : 5 Wild Theories].

This means that somehow the moon was formed from earthen materials. Therefore, the earth probably did not have a significant atmosphere until the Late Heavy Bombardment period ended. Very early life did not depend on oxygen. After the earth ’s oxygen levels rose, conditions were ripe

Early Earth was bombarded by material that plunged all the way to its core or splashed off, requiring the planet to take more hits to deposit some of the elements present in its mantle. © Southwest Research Institute Early Earth was bombarded by material that plunged all the way to its core or splashed off, requiring the planet to take more hits to deposit some of the elements present in its mantle.

Earth may have been bruised by the impact of more than one moon-size object early in its life. 

New simulations suggest that much of the material that crashed into our young planet may have been swallowed up by Earth's core or ricocheted back into space, requiring more collisions to leave the elemental signatures scientists see in the crust today.

The young solar system was a violent place. Planetesimals, the massive objects that didn't quite manage to grow into planets, wound up destroying themselves as they crashed into other objects during a period known as late accretion. These collisions left traces of highly siderophile elements — metals have an affinity for iron, such as gold, platinum and iridium— within our planet's mantle.

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After the Earth was formed 4.6 billion years ago, our planet was first hit by a meteor the size of Mars Related Topics: Comets, Meteors, Moon , Early Earth .

But it took another hundred million years for Earth 's moon to spring into existence. " After colliding, the two similar-sized bodies then re-collided, forming an early Earth surrounded by a disk of material that combined to form the moon ," NASA said.

[How the Moon Formed: 5 Wild Theories]

By measuring how much of these metals was mixed into the mantle, scientists estimated that about half a percent of the Earth's present mass came from colliding planetesimals. But these estimates assumed that the mantle held onto all of the highly siderophile elements.

New simulations suggest that instead, some of the material might have been carried all the way into the core, where it would have mixed up or would have been thrown out of the system entirely. Both outcomes would have reduced the amount of metals that would have mixed into the mantle. That means Earth may have absorbed two to five times as many impacts as previously thought.

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"We modeled the massive collisions and how metals and silicates were integrated into Earth during this 'late accretion stage,' which lasted for hundreds of millions of years after the Moon formed," Simone Marchi, a researcher at the Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) in Colorado and lead author of a Nature Geoscience paper outlining these results, said in a statement. Marchi worked with Robin Canup, also at SwRI, and Richard Walker, a geologist at the University of Maryland.

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Scientists are revisiting the age-old question of how Earth ’s moon formed . New models indicate that it could have been born from the Earth following a giant collision after all. The idea of a moon - forming collision is not new.

This scenario, says Stanford University professor of geophysics Norman Sleep, was what the early Earth looked like just after a cataclysmic impact by a planet-size object that smashed into the infant Earth 4.5 billion years ago and formed the moon .

"Based on our simulations, the late-accretion mass delivered to Earth may be significantly greater than previously thought, with important consequences for the earliest evolution of our planet," Marchi said.

Follow Nola Taylor Redd at @NolaTRedd, Facebook, or Google+. Follow us at @Spacedotcom, Facebook or Google+. Originally published on Space.com.

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