Technology Boston Dynamics’ newest robot learns to open doors

04:35  13 february  2018
04:35  13 february  2018 Source:   techcrunch.com

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Apparently selling to SoftBank has only increased the rate at which Boston Dynamics produces ridiculous new videos of its crazy robots . In the past, we’ve seen this robot walk around, pick up boxes, open doors , and get tripped with hockey sticks. Now it’s learnt a new trick: backflipping.

Boston Dynamics best known for Atlas, its 5 foot 9 humanoid robot , and spot, a four legged 'dog robot '. New spot Mini prototype is shown wandering around a The robots will start in a vehicle, drive to a simulated disaster building, and then they'll have to open doors , walk on rubble, and use tools.

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Boston Dynamics has a new video showing off the latest version of Atlas—the badass humanoid robot . And it’s pretty incredible. Update, 10:17pm: Remember when the raptors learned how to open doors in Jurassic Park?

Google-owned Boston Dynamics released a video of the latest version of Atlas, a humanoid robot . Google's Newest Robot Looks Ready to Take Over the World. Atlas can open doors , hike through snow and stack boxes.

We knew this day would come sooner or later. Like the cloned velociraptors before it, Boston Dynamics’ newly redesigned Spot Mini has figured out how to open doors — with either its arm or face, depending on how you look at it.

The team behind the Big Dog proves that it's still the master of viral robotic marketing, even after switching teams from Google to Softbank. Three months after debuting a more streamlined version of its electronic Spot Mini, the company’s got another teaser wherein one robot equipped with a head-mounted arm makes (relatively) quick work of a door, letting his his pal waltz through.

The video’s impressive for both the agility of the arm itself, as well as the robot's ability to maintain balance as it swings open what looks to be a fairly heavy door.

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engineering from scratch to combine realtime responsiveness with machine learning complexity? The video showcased a much lighter and more agile version of the robot opening a door Earlier this year, Boston Dynamics introduced an all- new robot called Handle with a four foot vertical jump.

Possible cause of the singularity Boston Dynamics is secretive about upcoming projects, but new footage shows their robots in action—and the results are highly unsettling. First you can see Spot, an agile autonomous quadruped ripped directly from Isaac Asimov’s nightmares, opening a door with

“Clever girl,” indeed.

Like the last video, the teaser doesn’t offer a ton of insight into what’s new with the bumble bee colored version of the company’s already announced robot. Last time out, it appeared as though we got a preview of a pair of Kinect-style 3D cameras that could give a little more insight into the robot’s navigation system.

That tech seemed to hint at the possibility of an advanced autonomous control system. Given the brevity of the video, however, it’s tough to say whether someone’s controlling the ‘bots just out of frame.

If the company managed program Spot Mini to actually open the door on its own in order to help free its friend, well, perhaps it's time to be concerned.

Artificial intelligence poses risks of misuse by hackers, researchers say .
The researchers said the malicious use of AI poses imminent threats to digital, physical and political security by allowing for large-scale, finely targeted, highly efficient attacks. The study focuses on plausible developments within five years."We all agree there are a lot of positive applications of AI," Miles Brundage, a research fellow at Oxford's Future of Humanity Institute. "There was a gap in the literature around the issue of malicious use.

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