Technology Facebook tries to clarify how it collects data when you're not on Facebook

10:11  17 april  2018
10:11  17 april  2018 Source:   cnn.com

Facebook is about to tell users if their data was shared with Cambridge Analytica

  Facebook is about to tell users if their data was shared with Cambridge Analytica Facebook will begin notifying users whose data may have been involved in the controversy.Load Error

Facebook is trying to demystify the ways in which it tracks people when they aren't directly using the website or app. Zuckerberg said during testimony last week that the company collects data about people who have not signed up for Facebook "for security purposes."

If you ' re not a Facebook user, you may still get an ad from Facebook urging you to sign up for the service. Facebook insists it doesn't share your personal identity with advertisers and plans to further clarify and elaborate on the ways it uses data .

Mark Zuckerberg wearing a suit and tie © Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Facebook is trying to demystify the ways in which it tracks people when they aren't directly using the website or app.

The company on Monday published a blog post that outlined its data collection practices less than a week after Mark Zuckerberg testified about his company in front of Congress. The CEO at the time promised to follow up on questions he couldn't answer on the spot.

The blog post, written by product management director David Baser, is mainly about third-party websites and apps that send data about their users to Facebook, regardless of whether those users have Facebook profiles.

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For example, “liking” a Facebook fan page allows the owner of the page to collect any publicly available information about you: your age, sex, what country you ’ re from, the city you live in, and so on—although the data appears grouped together in a big chart, without any names attached.

In return for that information, Facebook helps those websites serve up relevant ads or receive analytics that help them understand how people use their services. The company gets this data from websites and apps that let people share or like posts using Facebook plugins, or log into the website with their Facebook accounts. Sites that use Facebook advertising or analytics tools also share data.

Facebook also says it uses the data to improve its own ads and identify bots and bad actors.

According to Facebook, the information it receives can include the name of the website or app, your IP address, your browser, what operating system you use and whether you've visited the third-party site before.

Facebook says it can match that data to a Facebook profile, if the person has one. If not, the company claims the data does not get used to create a profile.

Cambridge Analytica might have accessed private Facebook messages

  Cambridge Analytica might have accessed private Facebook messages Facebook just began notifying people if their information was accessed by Cambridge Analytica today. Soon after, the social media company created a Help Center page that you can check to see if you were one of the affected members who logged into quiz app This Is Your Digital Life. Apparently, doing so not only shared your News Feed, timeline and posts, but also your private messages. Facebook confirmed to Wired that the app used a read_mailbox permission, which, unlike other sensitive permissions that Facebook phased out a in April of 2015, didn't fully deprecate until October of that same year. Wired reports that while users would have needed to give their permission for the app (and hence Cambridge Analytica) to access their message inboxes, the request would have likely been hidden in with a bunch of other permission requests, which users may have missed when "agreeing" to share their data. Facebook says that a total of 1,500 people gave This Is Your Digital Life permission, though the total of actual users affected is unknown. The problem goes beyond those that granted permission to share; if you in some way messaged with any of those users, you might be also impacted.

Considering the current stories coming to light involving the use of personal information on Facebook by a third party, we received a lot of emails asking how we deal with the Facebook data we collect . In this blog post, we want to clarify how our applications ensure your private information is prot

Many don’t trust Facebook with their data anymore, and they’ re threatening to delete their accounts. Just by signing up for the service, you ’ve agreed to let Facebook track your activity and constantly collect data about you .

Zuckerberg said during testimony last week that the company collects data about people who have not signed up for Facebook "for security purposes." That statement raised concerns about whether the company has "shadow profiles" with information about non-users.

Facebook told CNNMoney late Monday that it does not have "shadow profiles."

Related: Congress grilled Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg for nearly 10 hours. What's next?

Baser's post notably calls out other companies that it says do similar things. While Facebook has been getting the brunt of the recent outrage over its data collection and privacy practices, some methods are industry standard.

"Twitter, Pinterest and LinkedIn all have similar Like and Share buttons to help people share things on their services. Google has a popular analytics service. And Amazon, Google and Twitter all offer login features," Baser wrote in in the blog post. "In fact, most websites and apps send the same information to multiple companies each time you visit them."

The blog post also reviews the types of controls people with Facebook accounts have over their data. For example, users can opt out of ads or delete their profiles.

Despite #deleteFacebook, U.S. users are logging in as much as ever .
<p>The development is unexpected, considering the massive amount of backlash that Facebook received after the Cambridge Analytica scandal.</p><p></p>But the social network’s executives didn’t appear to be worried, saying that they didn’t see this as a “continuing trend.

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