The page you are looking for is temporarily unavailable.
Please try again later

Technology Earth’s Days Are Getting Longer—Thanks to the Moon

15:36  05 june  2018
15:36  05 june  2018 Source:   newsweek.com

Astronaut Alan Bean, member of Apollo 12 moon mission, dead at 86

  Astronaut Alan Bean, member of Apollo 12 moon mission, dead at 86 Astronaut Alan Bean, the fourth man to walk on the Moon who later turned to painting, died Saturday. He was 86. Bean, a native of Wheeler, Texas, was a member of the Apollo 12 mission in November 1969, traveling to the moon alongside Pete Conrad and Richard Gordon.Bean and Conrad conducted experiments on the moon's surface and installed a nuclear power generator on the moon.He was also spacecraft commander of Skylab Mission II in 1973, spending 59 days in space.Following his space days, Bean became a painter — inspired in large part by his out-of-this-world experiences.

More than a billion years ago, a day on Earth lasted just 18 hours, a new study reports. The distance from our planet to the moon , scientists say, is one major reason for the extra six hours we have today. Our faithful rocky companion used to lie far closer to our planet—close enough to alter the way it

By the time I was done looking at Earth , the next day would be spent looking at the moon and visa versa. You would never see the same spot for very long Fraser and Ian, thanks for this insightful article, but it would be nice if someone were to suggest a practical schedule for getting to the moon .

a satellite in space © Provided by IBT Media

More than a billion years ago, a day on Earth lasted just 18 hours, a new study reports. The distance from our planet to the moon, scientists say, is one major reason for the extra six hours we have today.

Our faithful rocky companion used to lie far closer to our planet—close enough to alter the way it moves, researchers reported Monday in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

“As the moon moves away, the Earth is like a spinning figure skater who slows down as they stretch their arms out,” explained Stephen Meyers, study co-author professor of geoscience at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, in a statement. Scientists think the moon is now moving about 1.5 inches away from our planet every year, but this wasn't always the case.

Moon 'may attend Trump-Kim summit'

  Moon 'may attend Trump-Kim summit' If the summit goes ahead, which remains uncertain, it could also feature the South Korean president.Any attendance by Mr Moon would be dependent on the progress of pre-summit talks between the US and North Korean leaders, said the Blue House.

Almost imperceptibly, however, Earth ' s day –night cycle —one rotation on its axis— is growing longer year by year, and has been for most of the planet's history. Forces from afar conspire to put the brakes on our spinning world—ocean tides generated by both the moon and sun's gravity add

Earth ' s days are getting longer but you're not likely to notice any time soon—it would take about 3.3 million years to gain just one minute, according to a study published on The previous 2.3 ms estimate had been based on calculations of the Moon 's known Earth -braking forces, causing the ocean tides.

As planets and other astronomical bodies move through space, they influence each other’s movements in a complex display of orbital gymnastics. The force exerted by these objects can affect everything from sunlight distribution to climate change over many thousands of years. Rock can offer a record of some of these changes over hundreds of million years.

But in the history of our solar system—which stretches back billions of years—a few hundred million isn’t all that much. This uncertainty is compounded by something called solar system chaos—a theory that predicts small, early changes in the movement of the planets can eventually lead to massive variations.

Meyers and his team used statistics to marry geological observations and astronomical theory. By combining these disciplines, researchers aim to probe our planet’s—and our solar system’s—past. “The geologic record is an astronomical observatory for the early solar system,” Meyers said in the statement. “We want to be able to study rocks that are billions of years old in a way that is comparable to how we study modern geologic processes.”

Alien life might thrive on the moons of these 121 giant planets

  Alien life might thrive on the moons of these 121 giant planets Moons orbiting huge exoplanets may be even better places to live than Earth, scientists say. But there's a catch.An international team of scientists has identified 121 gas giant planets, each at least three times more massive than Earth, that orbit in the habitable zones of their stars and are each expected to play host to several large moons.

Today will be one second longer than usual, and we have the moon to thank for the extra time. A "leap second" will be added to the world's official clocks this evening (June 30), to account for the fact that Earth ' s rotation is slowing ever so slightly — meaning our days are getting longer

My thanks to Bad Reader Charlie Kluepfel for pointing this all out to me!] This is making the day get longer . The effect is small, but measurable. [Note: by month, I mean the time it takes the moon to go around the Earth once, about 27 days or so.

The researchers integrated a sophisticated statistical method called “TimeOpt” with tools from astronomy and geology to get a better handle on our planet’s uncertain past. Using a 1.4-billion-year-old rock layer from China and a 55-million-year-old layer from the southern Atlantic Ocean, the team were able to test their idea. “We are looking at its pulsing rhythm, preserved in the rock and the history of life,” Meyers said in the statement.

The method, they discovered, could reliably evaluate Earth’s rotation and orbit around the sun. They used it to estimate the growing space between Earth and the moon over time, and the slow but inevitable stretching of our days. Next, they want to apply their method to other intervals of geologic time, added study co-author and Lamont Research Professor at Columbia, Alberto Malinverno in the statement.

Recovered Tapes Solve A Moon Mystery .
The big Moon mystery has now been solved. And yes, humans are to blame.The results confirm that inexplicable changes in the moon’s temperatures recorded in the 1970s were not the result of some strange inner heat source, but rather the by-product on astronauts stomping around and stirring up moon dust.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

This is interesting!