Technology SpaceX and Boeing are racing to put a man in space, and they’re both losing

20:12  12 july  2018
20:12  12 july  2018 Source:   bgr.com

Astronaut Chris Hadfield says we could have gone to Mars decades ago — here's why we haven't

  Astronaut Chris Hadfield says we could have gone to Mars decades ago — here's why we haven't Former astronaut has flown on three space missions and spent nearly half a year in orbit. People could have landed on "decades ago" if we'd really wanted to, Hadfield said, but s uch missions may have been deadly due to Between 1995 and 2013, Hadfield flew inside two NASA space shuttles and a Russian spacecraft, lived aboard the International Space Station, and spent a total of 166 days in orbit.

Right now, both SpaceX and Boeing are working independently to meet that demand, but a new report from the Government Accountability Office reveals that neither of them are as far along as they should be , and that’s not great news to U.S. astronauts.

However, we ' re now hearing that SpaceX ’s manned launch has been delayed until December, which pushes Elon Musk's company back until after Boeing ’s planned manned flight in November. Even so, SpaceX ’s aggressive timeline had put them in a comfortable lead.

a plane flying in the sky © Provided by BGR

NASA would love to stop having to rely on Russia to send its astronauts into space, but realizing that dream means that someone needs to step up to the plate with a safe, reliable crew transportation system. Right now, both SpaceX and Boeing are working independently to meet that demand, but a new report from the Government Accountability Office reveals that neither of them are as far along as they should be, and that’s not great news to U.S. astronauts.

The two companies — SpaceX with its Dragon capsule and Boeing with its Starliner spacecraft — are both under contract with NASA to develop, build, and launch commercial crew missions to the International Space Station, but assessments of the two companies’ systems reveal shortcomings that will likely delay the deployment of both.

Elon Musk's rescue sub is on its way to Thailand

  Elon Musk's rescue sub is on its way to Thailand Musk said it could also work as "an escape pod in space."The billionaire entrepreneur and engineers at at his private spaceflight company SpaceX have designed a "kid-size submarine" that they say could help with a harrowing rescue operation underway to retrieve a group of boys trapped in a flooded cave in Thailand.

The new space race . "It's all about getting hardware to orbit Under the Commercial Crew program, SpaceX and Boeing will return the capability of launching The way that they changed the zeitgeist," Christensen said. The rocket put SpaceX at the top of a short list of available heavy lift vehicles.

" They ' re both different, and they ' re both better than suits that we've had in the past," Williams said. It wants Boeing and SpaceX 's spacecraft to have less than a 1-in-200 chance of killing a crew in an accident — three times less than the space shuttle.

The government report doesn’t mince words regarding how the delays could affect NASA’s science efforts as they relate to work aboard the International Space Station:

“Boeing and SpaceX continue to make progress developing their crew transportation systems, but both contractors have further delayed the certification milestone to early 2019. Without a viable contingency option for ensuring uninterrupted access to the ISS in the event of further commercial crew delays, we concluded that NASA was at risk of not being able to maximize the return on its multibillion dollar investment in the space station.” 

In short, if the two companies can’t keep up with their milestones, NASA simply doesn’t have a backup plan for getting its astronauts to the space station. Meeting NASA’s demands means proving beyond a shadow of a double that the manned spacecraft are capable of safely delivering astronauts to the ISS, and neither company has come close yet.

As SpaceX has clearly demonstrated over the past decade, building new spaceflight systems is incredibly challenging. The company has celebrated its failures in the past as learning experiences, but things change dramatically when human lives are on the line. It’s obviously crucial that both companies get things right, and if delays mean safe travel in the future, it’ll be worth the wait.

Boeing Gets $3.9 Billion Contract for New Air Force One .
Capping off a contentious contracting tussle with President Donald Trump, Boeing Co. received a $3.9 billion contract to continue development, modification and testing of two new aircraft to serve as Air Force One, according to two people familiar with the decision. The planes, Boeing 747-8s, would be delivered by December 2024. That would be Trump’s last full year in office if he wins a second term. Congressional committees were informed of the decision on Tuesday.Trump reached an informal deal in late February with Chicago-based Boeing for the fixed-price contract that a White House spokesman said at the time would save taxpayers $1.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

This is interesting!