Technology Twitter now supports two-factor authentication apps, here’s how to secure your account

12:56  17 april  2017
12:56  17 april  2017 Source:   MSN

Twitter now supports two-factor authentication apps, here’s how to secure your account

  Twitter now supports two-factor authentication apps, here’s how to secure your account <p>f you wanted to lock down your Twitter account and make it harder for hackers to break in, you’d either have to turn on SMS-based two-factor authentication (2FA) or generate a one-time login code.</p>Android Police heard from a Twitter developer that the company had added support for third-party authentication some months ago, but didn’t announce it publicly. Still, it’s better late than never for those of us who want to keep our accounts safe from pesky hackers (and I hope that includes you, Mark Zuckerberg).

Unfortunately, for now Twitter only supports two - factor authentication by SMS, so if you don't want to attach your phone number to your account , or don't have reliable or secure phone service, it may not fit.

You can add an extra layer of security to your Slack account by turning on two - factor authentication (2FA). This requires you to have access to your phone when you log in. This means even if your password is compromised or stolen, only you can log in to your account . 🔐. Here ’ s how it works

  Twitter now supports two-factor authentication apps, here’s how to secure your account © Provided by The Next Web If you wanted to lock down your Twitter account and make it harder for hackers to break in, you’d either have to turn on SMS-based two-factor authentication (2FA) or generate a one-time login code. But now, you can use handy third-party authentication apps like Google Authenticator and Authy.

Android Police heard from a Twitter developer that the company had added support for third-party authentication some months ago, but didn’t announce it publicly. Still, it’s better late than never for those of us who want to keep our accounts safe from pesky hackers (and I hope that includes you, Mark Zuckerberg).

7 Ways To Protect Your Social Media Account from Hackers

  7 Ways To Protect Your Social Media Account from Hackers Hackers could steal your private information through your social media accounts. Protect yourself with these seven tips.However, there are ways to protect your accounts from hackers while uploading selfies and posting on social media.

Unfortunately, for now Twitter only supports two - factor authentication by SMS, so if you don't want to attach your phone number to your account , or don't have reliable or secure phone service, it may not fit.

Steam now famously offers two - factor authentication by default, you can read all about it here . If you’re an Xbox gamer, don’t forget to secure your Microsoft Account (instructions for which can be found above).

  Twitter now supports two-factor authentication apps, here’s how to secure your account © Provided by The Next Web Here’s how to set it up:

  • Install a two-factor authentication app like Google Authenticator or Authy, and set up your personal account with the service on your phone.
  • Log in to Twitter and head to Settings.
  • Under the ‘Security’ head, check the box that says ‘Verify login requests’ and type in the verification code you receive via SMS on that page.
  • Next, click the button labeled ‘Setup a code generator app’; instructions, along with a bar code will pop up. Launch the 2FA app on your phone and use it to scan the bar code.
  • You’ll now see a six-digit code labeled Twitter in your 2FA app. The next time you try to log into Twitter, you’ll be prompted to enter this code that changes every few seconds. It works even if your phone is offline.

And that’s it. You no longer have to worry about hackers breaking into your account without your knowledge – unless of course, they breach Twitter’s systems or you lose your phone and haven’t locked it.

PINs and passwords can be stolen just by watching the way a phone tilts, scientists find .
<p>People's passwords could be exposed with just a tilt of their phone, according to a new study.</p>Research from Newcastle University shows that PINs and passwords can be found just by watching how a phone moves when it is being held. And they warn that same information could be used by malicious websites and apps, to gain access to the most personal parts of people's lives.

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