Technology Sunrise on Saturn: Gorgeous Cassini Photo Shows Start of New Day

20:35  16 july  2017
20:35  16 july  2017 Source:   Space.com

Saturn's largest moon has enough energy to run a colony

  Saturn's largest moon has enough energy to run a colony Titan may be humanity's next outpost after Mars.Some generation methods would be more realistic than others. Wind power would only be truly effective in the upper atmosphere (albeit 10 times more effective than on Earth) and would require tethered turbines. Solar energy, meanwhile, would be the most daunting. Titan barely gets any sunlight, so you'd need a tremendous number of solar panels. A population roughly that of the US, about 300 million, would require enough panels that you could cover the US. Solar would clearly be more of an energy supplement than a primary source, then.

This is what dawn on Saturn looks like, from afar. The ringed planet is partly hidden in darkness and partly illuminated by the faint light of a distant sun in a gorgeous photo taken by NASA's Cassini spacecraft.

By Mike Wall Space.com Senior Writer This is what dawn on Saturn looks like, from afar. Read More Source:: Fox News Science - SCOOPTON.

NASA's Cassini spacecraft captured this view of Saturn on Feb. 25, 2017, from a distance of 762,000 miles (1.23 million kilometers).© NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute NASA's Cassini spacecraft captured this view of Saturn on Feb. 25, 2017, from a distance of 762,000 miles (1.23 million kilometers). This is what dawn on Saturn looks like, from afar.

The ringed planet is partly hidden in darkness and partly illuminated by the faint light of a distant sun in a gorgeous photo taken by NASA's Cassini spacecraft.

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"The light has traveled around 80 minutes since it left the sun's surface by the time it reaches Saturn," NASA officials wrote in a description of the image, which was released yesterday (July 10). "The illumination it provides is feeble; Earth gets 100 times the intensity, since it's roughly 10 times closer to the sun. Yet compared to the deep blackness of space, everything at Saturn still shines bright in the sunlight, be it direct or reflected."[Cassini's Saturn 'Grand Finale' Plan in Pictures]

Twinkle, twinkle, littlest star: Universe's smallest star discovered

  Twinkle, twinkle, littlest star: Universe's smallest star discovered The smallest star ever recorded — one about the size of Saturn — has been discovered by a team of astronomers, according to a study released Tuesday. With the unwieldy name of EBLM J0555-57Ab, the star is located some 600 light-years away in our Milky Way galaxy.

This is what dawn on Saturn looks like, from afar. The ringed planet is partly hidden in darkness and partly illuminated by the faint light of a distant sun in a gorgeous photo taken by NASA's Cassini spacecraft.

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Cassini took the photo on Feb. 25, at a distance of about 762,000 miles (1.23 million kilometers) from the ringed planet.

The $3.2 billion Cassini-Huygens mission — a joint effort of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency — has been orbiting Saturn since July 2004, but its days are numbered: The spacecraft is scheduled to plunge into the gas giant's cloud tops on Sept. 15, in an intentional death dive designed to ensure that Cassini doesn't contaminate the Saturn moons Titan or Enceladus with microbes from Earth. (Both Titan and Enceladus may be capable of supporting life, scientists have said.)

Huygens was a piggyback lander that separated from the Cassini mothership and made a historic touchdown on Titan in January 2005 — the first soft touchdown ever achieved on a body in the outer solar system.

Hearing delayed for Pennsylvania road rage shooting suspect .
<p>A preliminary hearing for a Pennsylvania man charged with fatally shooting an 18-year-old woman during a road rage encounter has been postponed.</p>Tuesday's hearing for 28-year-old David Desper, of Trainer, was postponed at his attorney's request until Aug. 17.

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