Technology Flat microscope for the brain could help restore lost eyesight

07:35  17 july  2017
07:35  17 july  2017 Source:   Engadget

Ajax player Nouri has severe and permanent brain damage

  Ajax player Nouri has severe and permanent brain damage Ajax midfielder Abdelhak Nouri has been diagnosed with severe and permanent brain damage, five days after he collapsed due to an irregular heartbeat during a friendly game in Austria. 2 cards charging 0% Interest until 2019 See The 0% APR Cards Sponsored by NextAdvisor Dutch club Ajax said Thursday on Twitter that it ''received very bad news'' regarding Nouri's condition, after doctors at a hospital in Innsbruck, Austria woke the player from an induced coma.The club added that ''recovery chances of these crucial brain functions are nil.

You'd probably prefer that doctors restore lost sight or hearing by directly repairing your eyes and ears, but Rice University is one step closer to the next best thing: transmitting info directly to your brain . It's developing a flat microscope (the creatively titled FlatScope)

However researchers at Rice University might have come up with something else that could help to restore not only eyesight , but other sensory impairments in the future thanks to a brain implant. Dubbed the FlatScope, this is basically a flat microscope that sits in your brain and is capable of

  Flat microscope for the brain could help restore lost eyesight © Provided by Engadget

You'd probably prefer that doctors restore lost sight or hearing by directly repairing your eyes and ears, but Rice University is one step closer to the next best thing: transmitting info directly to your brain. It's developing a flat microscope (the creatively titled FlatScope) that sits on your brain to both monitor and trigger neurons modified to be fluorescent when active. It should not only capture much more detail than existing brain probes (the team is hoping to see "a million" neurons), but reach levels deep enough that it should shed light on how the mind processes sensory input. And that, in turn, opens the door to controlling sensory input.

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However, a Pakistan requirement would likely have a chilling effect. As you have to register your SIM card with a fingerprint in the country, any phone number is indelibly tied to its owner -- write a provocative post and authorities could easily come knocking at your door.

In theory, sharing that material could have exposed staff to identity theft in the event of a government data breach, which the judge saw as a realistic possibility. Officials aren't coming away completely empty-handed.

FlatScope is part of a broader DARPA initiative that aims to create a high-resolution neural interface. If technologies like the microscope lead to a way to quickly interpret neuron activity, it should be possible to craft sensors that send audiovisual data to the brain and effectively take over for any missing senses. Any breakthrough on that level is a long way off (at best) when even FlatScope exists as just a prototype, but there is some hope that blindness and deafness will eventually become things of the past.

A cancer that's 'almost like a tumor in a tumor' .
Being told you have cancer is never welcome, but being told you have a glioblastoma tumor is especially scary. This is the news that longtime Arizona Sen. John McCain got after he had a blood clot removed above his left eye last week. A glioblastoma tumor killed Sen. Edward M. Kennedy in 2009. It also was responsible for the death of Beau Biden, son of then-Vice President Joe Biden, in 2015.Glioblastomas are known among the medical community for being an especially aggressive form of brain cancer and particularly challenging to treat."The median overall survival rate is somewhere between 14 and 16 months," said Dr.

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