Technology The time-honored, eye-searing tradition of staring directly at a solar eclipse

20:21  06 august  2017
20:21  06 august  2017 Source:   Quartz

Revealed: What the Sun's Outer Atmosphere Will Look Like During the Total Solar Eclipse

  Revealed: What the Sun's Outer Atmosphere Will Look Like During the Total Solar Eclipse With the Aug. 21 total solar eclipse only a few weeks away, astronomers have revealed what the sun's outer atmosphere is likely to look like as the sun disappears behind the moon. The World's Richest Agree: This Will Impact Everything See The Tech Sponsored by The Motley Fool The Aug. 21 eclipse will sweep across the continental U.S. from Oregon to South Carolina along a stretch of land about 70 miles (113 kilometers) wide. Skywatchers within this path will experience totality, when the moon appears to move directly in front of the solar disk and casts a long shadow on Earth.

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Watching a solar eclipse is a memorable experience, but looking directly at the sun can seriously damage your eyes . Staring at the sun for even a short time without wearing the right eye protection can damage your retina permanently.

  The time-honored, eye-searing tradition of staring directly at a solar eclipse © Provided by Quartz The solar eclipse taking place later this August is expected to send millions of people flocking to communities along the phenomenon’s path. While all the excitement might be blamed on the moment-seeking Instagram generation, chasing eclipses is a time-honored tradition. Here’s a quick visual history of eclipse spectatorship around the world over the past century.

Solar eclipse in today’s Kazakhstan, 1907

Observers watching a solar eclipse with telescopes in what is current day Kazakhstan in 1907.

  The time-honored, eye-searing tradition of staring directly at a solar eclipse © Provided by Quartz Paris, 1911

A crowd looking at an eclipse in Paris, 1911.

  The time-honored, eye-searing tradition of staring directly at a solar eclipse © Provided by Quartz White House lawn, 1925

US president Calvin Coolidge viewing a solar eclipse on the White House lawn on Jan. 24, 1925

Sign Up for Free Livestreams from Space Telescopes Just in Time for the Solar Eclipse

  Sign Up for Free Livestreams from Space Telescopes Just in Time for the Solar Eclipse Members willing to pay extra will have the power to control telescopes around the world.As The Verge reports, Slooh provides livestreams of full moons, comets, and even exploding galaxies, observed through its seven telescopes on the Canary Islands and three more in Chile, for what’s normally a monthly membership fee of $4.95. It also periodically provides free streams of celestial events like meteor showers, planets in opposition, and the occasional super beaver moon.

People watch a solar eclipse through smoked glass or film on Japan's Rebun Island in 1949. We've all heard the warnings before: Looking directly at the sun, whether it's with your naked eyes or through an optical aid Less than 1 percent of the visible sun is still 4,000 times brighter than the full moon.

A MAN left blind after looking directly at a solar eclipse 53 years ago is urging Britons not to look at the astronomical spectacle with a "naked eye ." Just 13 at the time , Mr Hanlon joined the crowds - but paid the devastating price after losing his sight because he stared at the rare phenomenon for too long.

  The time-honored, eye-searing tradition of staring directly at a solar eclipse © Provided by Quartz New York City, 1932

Eclipse watchers squint through protective film as they view a partial eclipse of the sun from the top deck of New York’s Empire State Building Aug. 31, 1932.

  The time-honored, eye-searing tradition of staring directly at a solar eclipse © Provided by Quartz Bucharest, 1961

Romanians observe a total eclipse of the sun through smoked pieces of glass in downtown Bucharest Feb. 15, 1961.

  The time-honored, eye-searing tradition of staring directly at a solar eclipse © Provided by Quartz Valdosta, Georgia, 1970

Ginnie Bailey reaches for her eclipse viewer from her father Robert Bailey of Valdosta as the eclipsed sun begins to burn through a cloud cover that has all but obscured a view of the total solar eclipse in Valdosta, Georgia on March 7, 1970.

  The time-honored, eye-searing tradition of staring directly at a solar eclipse © Provided by Quartz Thailand, 1995

Young Buddhist monks watch the solar eclipse through various kinds of filters at this town bordering Thailand and Burma on October 24, 1995.

What do Americans think of the eclipse?

  What do Americans think of the eclipse? <p>Later this month, the U.S. will experience a total solar eclipse, a rare occurrence, and most Americans are interested in possibly trying to get a glimpse of it.</p>Sixty-eight percent are interested enough in the eclipse to say they plan to or may try to see it, including a third who are excited about it. Three in 10 say they won't be paying much attention to it.

The patient thought that "it would be a neat thing to burn out my retinas," took LSD and stared at the sun for an unknown length of time . NEVER look at a partial solar eclipse without proper eye protection. Looking directly at the sun, even when it is partially covered by the moon, can cause

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  The time-honored, eye-searing tradition of staring directly at a solar eclipse © Provided by Quartz Vatican City, 1999

Two unidentified nuns watch a solar eclipse through protective glassed outside of St. Peter’s Square at the Vatican, on Aug. 11, 1999.

International Space Station astronauts to view the solar eclipse 3 times .
<p>While millions of Americans gather across the country to catch a glimpse of Monday's total solar eclipse, the astronauts aboard the International Space Station will view the event from a much different vantage point.</p>The ISS crew members are predicted to view both a partial eclipse and the moon's shadow cast on the North American continent as they make three tracks around the planet 400 km above Earth's surface, according to NASA.

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