Technology US spacewalkers float out to lubricate robotic arm

16:25  10 october  2017
16:25  10 october  2017 Source:   AFP

Spacewalkers install new hand on station's robot arm

  Spacewalkers install new hand on station's robot arm Spacewalking astronauts gave the International Space Station's big robot arm a new hand Thursday.Commander Randy Bresnik and Mark Vande Hei accomplished the job on the first of three NASA spacewalks planned over the next two weeks.The latching mechanism on one end of the 58-foot robot arm malfunctioned in August. It needed to be replaced before the arrival of an Orbital ATK supply ship in November.Hustling through their work, the spacewalkers unbolted the old mechanism and promptly installed the spare. Initial testing by ground controllers indicated success.

Two NASA astronauts wrapped up a successful spacewalk Thursday to repair the International Space Station's aging robotic arm , the US space agency said. "The second and third spacewalks will be devoted to lubricating the newly installed end effector and replacing cameras on the left side of the

Two NASA astronauts embarked on a spacewalk Thursday to repair the International Space Station's aging robotic arm , the US space agency said. So what is it like to float out into the vacuum of space?

Two US astronauts embarked on a spacewalk to repair to the International Space Station's robotic arm. This NASA picture show astronauts working on the arm on October 5 © Provided by AFP Two US astronauts embarked on a spacewalk to repair to the International Space Station's robotic arm. This NASA picture show astronauts working on the arm on October 5

Two US astronauts embarked Tuesday on the second spacewalk this month to make much-needed repairs to the International Space Station's robotic arm, NASA said.

Expedition 53 Commander Randy Bresnik is leading the outing, accompanied by NASA flight engineer Mark Vande Hei.

The spacewalk formally began when the duo switched their spacesuits to battery power at 7:56 am (1156 GMT), then floated out into the vacuum of space, NASA said.

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The pair will go back out Tuesday to lubricate the new arm attachment. The latching mechanism on one end of the 58-foot robot arm malfunctioned in August. Related Stories. US spacewalkers begin repair of aging ISS robotic arm .

The pair will go back out Tuesday to lubricate the new arm attachment. Hustling through their work, the spacewalkers unbolted the old mechanism and promptly installed the spare. "All right, gentlemen, we show a good arm ," Mission Control radioed. "That is great news, Houston," Bresnik said.

On their spacewalk Thursday, the pair replaced the latching end of the 57-foot-long (18-meter) Canadian-made arm, called Canadarm2.

The robotic arm was installed at the orbiting outpost 16 years ago, and recently stopped gripping effectively.

Astronauts need it in working order so it can capture incoming cargo ships that ferry supplies to the crew living in orbit. The next US shipment arrives in November.

Tuesday's spacewalk, and another one on October 18, are devoted "to lubricating the newly replaced Canadarm2 end effector and replacing cameras on the left side of the station's truss and the right side of the station's US Destiny laboratory," NASA said.

The spacewalk is scheduled to last six and a half hours.

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