Technology Equifax takes down web page after report of potential hack

23:31  12 october  2017
23:31  12 october  2017 Source:   Reuters

Equifax breach included 10 million US driving licenses

  Equifax breach included 10 million US driving licenses 10.9 million US driver's licenses were stolen in the massive breach that Equifax suffered in mid-May, according to a new report by The Wall Street Journal. In addition, WSJ has revealed that the attackers got a hold of 15.2 million UK customers' records, though only 693,665 among them had enough info in the system for the breach to be a real threat to their privacy. Affected customers provided most of the driver's licenses on file to verify their identities when they disputed their credit-report information through an Equifax web page.

Web Chutney. SAN FRANCISCO: Equifax said Friday that two executives entrusted with watching over its computers are retiring, their departures coming after its maligned handling of a major hack at the credit reporting agency.

NEW YORK (Reuters) - Equifax Inc said on Thursday it has taken one of its customer help web pages offline as its security team looks into reports of another potential cyber breach at the credit reporting company, which recently disclosed a hack that compromised the sensitive information of

The previous Equifax cyber attack has sparked several investigations. © Mike Stewart The previous Equifax cyber attack has sparked several investigations.

NEW YORK — Equifax Inc. said on Thursday it has taken one of its customer help website pages offline as its security team looks into reports of another potential cyber breach at the credit reporting company, which recently disclosed a hack that compromised the sensitive information of more than 145 million people.  

The move came after an independent security analyst on Wednesday found part of Equifax's website was under the control of attackers trying to trick visitors into installing fraudulent Adobe Flash updates that could infect computers with malware, the technology news website Ars Technica reported.

Equifax breach included 10 million US driving licenses

  Equifax breach included 10 million US driving licenses 10.9 million US driver's licenses were stolen in the massive breach that Equifax suffered in mid-May, according to a new report by The Wall Street Journal. In addition, WSJ has revealed that the attackers got a hold of 15.2 million UK customers' records, though only 693,665 among them had enough info in the system for the breach to be a real threat to their privacy. Affected customers provided most of the driver's licenses on file to verify their identities when they disputed their credit-report information through an Equifax web page.

Equifax Inc said on Thursday it has taken one of its customer help web pages offline as its security team looks into reports of another potential cyber breach at the credit reporting company. The move came after an independent security analyst on Wednesday found part of Equifax 's website

Equifax Inc. said on Thursday it has taken one of its customer help web pages offline as its security team looks into reports of another potential cyber breach at the credit reporting company.

"We are aware of the situation identified on the equifax.com website in the credit report assistance link," Equifax spokesman Wyatt Jefferies said in an email. "Our IT and security teams are looking into this matter, and out of an abundance of caution have temporarily taken this page offline."  

The Atlanta-based company, which has faced seething criticism from consumers, regulators and lawmakers over its handling of the earlier breach, said it would provide more information as it becomes available.  

As of 1:15 p.m. (1715 GMT), the web page in question said: "We're sorry ... The website is currently down for maintenance. We are working diligently to better serve you, and apologize for any inconvenience this may cause. We appreciate your patience during this time and ask that you check back with us soon."  

Equifax: 2.5 million more Americans may be affected by hack

  Equifax: 2.5 million more Americans may be affected by hack Credit report company Equifax is now saying an additional 2.5 million Americans may have been affected by a massive security breach this summer, bringing the total to 145.5 million people. Equifax said the company it hired to do an examination of the breach, Mandiant, has concluded its investigation and plans to release the results "promptly."The update comes as Equifax's former CEO, Richard Smith, will testify in front of Congress starting Tuesday.

Equifax Inc has taken one of its web pages offline as its security team looks into reports of another potential cyber breach, the credit reporting company, which recently disclosed a hack that compromised the sensitive information of 145.5 million people, said on Thursday.

Equifax takes web page offline after reports of new cyber attack. FOREX-Dollar strengthens after data; sterling slips on Brexit talk woes. Real-Time After Hours Pre-Market News. Flash Quote Summary Quote Interactive Charts Default Setting.

Equifax shares were down 1.2 percent at $109.18 in early afternoon trading. Randy Abrams, the independent analyst who noticed the possible hack, said he was attempting to check some information in his credit report late on Wednesday when one of the bogus pop-up ads appeared on Equifax's website.  

His first reaction was disbelief, he said in an interview with Reuters on Thursday. "You've got to be kidding me," he recalled thinking. Then he successfully replicated the problem at least five times, making a video that he posted to YouTube.

Equifax's security protocols have been under scrutiny since Sept. 7 when the company disclosed its systems had been breached between mid-May and late July. The breach has prompted investigations by multiple federal and state agencies, including a criminal probe by the U.S. Department of Justice, and it has led to the departure of the company's chief executive officer, chief information officer and chief security officer.  

As a credit reporting agency, Equifax keeps vast amounts of consumer data for banks and other creditors to use to determine the chances of their customers' defaulting.


Senators bewildered by Equifax contract with IRS after hack .
Senators expressed bewilderment Wednesday that credit reporting company Equifax, under siege after a data breach affecting more than 145 million people, has received a $7.25 million contract with the IRS to provide taxpayer and personal identity verification services. "Why in the world should you get a no-bid contract right now?" Sen. Ben Sasse, R-Neb., asked former Equifax CEO Richard Smith at a Senate Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs Committee hearing.Sasse's indignation was soon topped by Sen. John Kennedy, R-La.

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