Technology Sean Parker: We Built Facebook to Exploit You

22:22  09 november  2017
22:22  09 november  2017 Source:   Daily Intelligencer

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Sean Parker : We Built Facebook to Exploit You . By Madison Malone Kircher. Sean Parker and his Facebook buddies knew exactly how to hook users. Photo: Theo Wargo/Getty Images for Global Citizen.

Sean Parker : Facebook was designed to exploit human "vulnerability". "The thought process that went into building these applications, Facebook being the first of them, was all about: 'How do we consume as much of your time and conscious attention as possible?'"

Sean Parker wearing a suit and tie: Entrepreneur and philanthropis Sean Parker speaks onstage during Global Citizen: Movement Makers at NYU Skirball Center on September 19, 2017 in New York City. © Theo Wargo/Getty Images for Global Citizen Entrepreneur and philanthropis Sean Parker speaks onstage during Global Citizen: Movement Makers at NYU Skirball Center on September 19, 2017 in New York City.

Facebook’s founding president Sean Parker — Justin Timberlake in The Social Network, if that’s how you keep track of the platform’s key players — sat down with Axios’s Mike Allen at an event in Philadelphia this week.

Parker, who now chairs the Parker Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy, was there to discuss advances in cancer research — but nevertheless managed to squeeze in a few comments about building Facebook. What he had to say is not going to make Zuck happy.

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He says Facebook was designed to exploit a major human “vulnerability,” and he’s gotten so concerned about the platform’s strength that he decided to speak out Sean Parker also explained their thought process as they went about building Facebook and how other social networks are built .

Sean Parker called Facebook a "social-validation feedback loop." A co-founder of Facebook bashed the company during an interview, saying that the social network was built to exploit vulnerabilities in human psychology.

Confirming what you basically know, but probably don’t want to think about too closely, Parker explained just how he and the other early Facebookers built the platform to “consume as much of your time and conscious attention as possible.”

He described the system of users posting content and receiving likes as “a social-validation feedback loop … exploiting a vulnerability in human psychology.”

“We need to sort of give you a little dopamine hit every once in a while, because someone liked or commented on a photo or a post or whatever,” Parker said.

“And that’s going to get you to contribute more content, and that’s going to get you … more likes and comments.” He also noted that he and Zuckerberg, and later Instagram’s Kevin Systrom, were very much aware of this and “did it anyway.”

Parker also joked that his comments would probably prompt Mark Zuckerberg to block him on Facebook. We’ll see.

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