Technology Privacy fears over artificial intelligence as crimestopper

13:06  13 november  2017
13:06  13 november  2017 Source:   AFP

CIA director met with DNC hack conspiracy theorist at Trump's urging

  CIA director met with DNC hack conspiracy theorist at Trump's urging CIA Director Mike Pompeo recently met -- at the urging of President Donald Trump -- with one of the principal deniers of Russian interference in the US election, according to multiple intelligence sources. Trump apparently made the highly unusual request that Pompeo meet with the former National Security Agency employee and look into a theory that the leak of Democratic Party emails last year was an inside job rather than a cyberattack by Russian hackers.

The program is part of a growing trend to use vision-based AI to thwart crime and improve public safety, a trend which has stirred concerns among privacy “Video is unstructured, it’s not searchable,” explained Amit Gavish, Briefcam’s US general manager. Without artificial intelligence , he says, ”you

Without artificial intelligence , he says, ''you had to go through hundreds of hours of video with fast forward and rewind." For Marc Rotenberg, president of the Electronic Privacy Information Center, the rapid growth in these technologies raises privacy risks and calls for regulatory scrutiny over how data

A display shows a vehicle and person recognition system for law enforcement during the NVIDIA GPU Technology Conference, which showcases artificial intelligence, deep learning, virtual reality and autonomous machines © Provided by AFP A display shows a vehicle and person recognition system for law enforcement during the NVIDIA GPU Technology Conference, which showcases artificial intelligence, deep learning, virtual reality and autonomous machines Police in the US state of Delaware are poised to deploy "smart" cameras in cruisers to help authorities detect a vehicle carrying a fugitive, missing child or straying senior.

The video feeds will be analyzed using artificial intelligence to identify vehicles by license plate or other features and "give an extra set of eyes" to officers on patrol, says David Hinojosa of Coban Technologies, the company providing the equipment.

Florida City Attorney Fears He’ll Be Assassinated By Police

  Florida City Attorney Fears He’ll Be Assassinated By Police A city attorney in Florida fears an assassination attempt on his life may occur--at the hands of city police officers. Fort Myers City Attorney Grant Alley relayed his fears to investigators who were looking into allegations that Alley had been unprofessional and “aggressive” when dealing with staff as of late.That report, commissioned by the Fort Myers City Council, was released on Tuesday. It reads, in relevant part:Mr.

Without artificial intelligence , he says, ''you had to go through hundreds of hours of video with fast forward and rewind." For Marc Rotenberg, president of the Electronic Privacy Information Center, the rapid growth in these technologies raises privacy risks and calls for regulatory scrutiny over how data

Life with big brother. Privacy fears over artificial intelligence as crimestopper . 'Issues of secret profiling, bias and accuracy enter the picture'.

"We are helping officers keep their focus on their jobs," said Hinojosa, who touts the new technology as a "dashcam on steroids."

The program is part of a growing trend to use vision-based AI to thwart crime and improve public safety, a trend which has stirred concerns among privacy and civil liberties activists who fear the technology could lead to secret "profiling" and misuse of data.

US-based startup Deep Science is using the same technology to help retail stores detect in real time if an armed robbery is in progress, by identifying guns or masked assailants.

Deep Science has pilot projects with US retailers, enabling automatic alerts in the case of robberies, fire or other threats.

The technology can monitor for threats more efficiently and at a lower cost than human security guards, according to Deep Science co-founder Sean Huver, a former engineer for DARPA, the Pentagon's long-term research arm.

China is building a police station powered by AI, not humans

  China is building a police station powered by AI, not humans China this week announced an AI-powered unmanned police station will open in one of its capitol cities, proving once again that no other country quite embraces artificial intelligence like it does. The station appears to be designed with driver and vehicle related matters in mind, making it more like a Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) than a cop shop. It will provide driver’s examinations via simulator, registration services, and feature advanced face-scanning technology developed by Tencent, according to a report from Chinese financial paper Caijing Neican.

Without artificial intelligence , he says, ''you had to go through hundreds of hours of video with fast forward and rewind." For Marc Rotenberg, president of the Electronic Privacy Information Center, the rapid growth in these technologies raises privacy risks and calls for regulatory scrutiny over how data

THE LATEST… Nov 12, 2017. Privacy fears over artificial intelligence as crimestopper .

"A common problem is that security guards get bored," he said.

Until recently, most predictive analytics relied on inputting numbers and other data to interpret trends. But advances in visual recognition are now being used to detect firearms, specific vehicles or individuals to help law enforcement and private security.

Recognize, interpret the environment

Elliot Hirsch of Deep Science holds a fake gun as he demonstrates the company's security system to automatically detect firearms and thieves © Provided by AFP Elliot Hirsch of Deep Science holds a fake gun as he demonstrates the company's security system to automatically detect firearms and thieves Saurabh Jain is product manager for the computer graphics group Nvidia, which makes computer chips for such systems and which held a recent conference in Washington with its technology partners.

He says the same computer vision technologies are used for self-driving vehicles, drones and other autonomous systems, to recognize and interpret the surrounding environment.

What life will be like when the computer disappears

  What life will be like when the computer disappears What happens when the computers around you all but disappear? Tiny sensors built into walls, household products, what you're wearing, and perhaps your own body will make computers invisible to the eye, but responsive to a gesture, voice, and perhaps your movement as you walk into a room. It is still very early, but the era of ambient computing is slowly taking shape, whether in the form of the voice-driven smart speaker on your kitchen countertop, or via the IoT (Internet of Things) devices and appliances that are designed to blend into the background.

Digital Life 12.11.2017 04:36 am. Privacy fears over artificial intelligence as crimestopper . But advances in visual recognition are now being used to detect firearms, specific vehicles or individuals to help law enforcement and private security.

Without artificial intelligence , he says, ''you had to go through hundreds of hours of video with fast forward and rewind." 'She's panicking about being away from her kids': Rebekah Vardy 'will be last to join I'm A Celeb' after 'almost pulling out over fears of leaving baby Finley and Sofia, 2, behind'.

Nvidia has some 50 partners who use its supercomputing module called Jetson or its Metropolis software for security and related applications, according to Jain.

One of those partners, California-based Umbo Computer Vision, has developed an AI-enhanced security monitoring system which can be used at schools, hotels or other locations, analyzing video to detect intrusions and threats in real-time, and sending alerts to a security guard's computer or phone.

Israeli startup Briefcam meanwhile uses similar technology to interpret video surveillance footage.

"Video is unstructured, it's not searchable," explained Amit Gavish, Briefcam's US general manager. Without artificial intelligence, he says, ''you had to go through hundreds of hours of video with fast forward and rewind."

"We detect, track, extract and classify each object in the video. So it becomes a database."

This can enable investigators to quickly find targets from video surveillance, a system already used by law enforcement in hundreds of cities around the world, including Paris, Boston and Chicago, Gavish said.

How did WikiLeaks become associated with Russia?

  How did WikiLeaks become associated with Russia? <p>WikiLeaks, the website that bills itself as "we open governments," and entities linked to the Kremlin have a relationship that goes back further than the 2016 election.</p>WikiLeaks, the website that bills itself as "we open governments," and entities linked to the Kremlin have a relationship that goes back further than the 2016 election.

Without artificial intelligence , he says, ''you had to go through hundreds of hours of video with fast forward and rewind." For Marc Rotenberg, president of the Electronic Privacy Information Center, the rapid growth in these technologies raises privacy risks and calls for regulatory scrutiny over how data

Police in the US state of Delaware are poised to deploy "smart" cameras in cruisers to help authorities detect a vehicle carrying a fugitive, missing child or straying senior.

"It's not only saving time. In many cases they wouldn't be able to do it because people who watch video become ineffective after 10 to 20 minutes," he said.

'Huge privacy issues'

Facial recognition can be useful for law enforcement and public safety but raises questions about secret profiling © Provided by AFP Facial recognition can be useful for law enforcement and public safety but raises questions about secret profiling Russia-based startup Vision Labs employs the Nvidia technology for facial recognition systems that can be used to identify potential shoplifters or problem customers in casinos or other locations.

Vadim Kilimnichenko, project manager at Vision Labs, said the company works with law enforcement in Russia as well as commercial clients.

"We can deploy this anywhere through the cloud," he said.

Customers of Vision labs include banks seeking to prevent fraud, which can use face recognition to determine if someone is using a false identity, Kilimnichenko said.

For Marc Rotenberg, president of the Electronic Privacy Information Center, the rapid growth in these technologies raises privacy risks and calls for regulatory scrutiny over how data is stored and applied.

"Some of these techniques can be helpful but there are huge privacy issues when systems are designed to capture identity and make a determination based on personal data," Rotenberg said.

"That's where issues of secret profiling, bias and accuracy enter the picture."

Rotenberg said the use of AI systems in criminal justice calls for scrutiny to ensure legal safeguards, transparency and procedural rights.

In a blog post earlier this year, Shelly Kramer of Futurum Research argued that AI holds great promise for law enforcement, be it for surveillance, scanning social media for threats, or using "bots" as lie detectors.

"With that encouraging promise, though, comes a host of risks and responsibilities."

North Korea Bans Drinking and Singing Parties .
The South Korean spy agency reported a new crackdown on information sharing and entertainment.As well as information being more strictly controlled, gatherings involving singing, drinking and entertainment are now banned, the National Intelligence Service reported in a briefing to South Korean lawmakers Monday.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

This is interesting!