Sport Feds don't want Lance Armstrong to say 'everybody was doing it'

12:06  17 july  2017
12:06  17 july  2017 Source:   USA TODAY

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To find out more about Facebook commenting please read the Conversation Guidelines and FAQs. Feds don ' t want Lance Armstrong to say ' everybody was CLOSE. The U.S. Justice Department joined forces with former cyclist Floyd Landis in 2013 to sue Lance Armstrong for civil fraud.

Feds don ' t want Lance Armstrong to say ' everybody was doing it '. I really got into it during Lance Armstrong 's string of victories. I still don ' t know what to think about that. Do a lot of them "dope" and some get caught?

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The United States government is putting Lance Armstrong on trial in November for civil fraud but doesn’t want the dirty history of cycling to be put on trial at the same time.

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It ain' t the first time Lance has been investigated by the feds -- Lance was under the microscope from 2010 to 2012 Seems everybody in Lance Armstrong 's world knew the truth about the cyclist -- that he was cheating his face off -- which begs the question how much did Sheryl Crow know?

"I don ' t think he wants to admit how sustaining it was for him," his friend says . "I kind of laughed at him and said , 'You're kidding—I haven't been on a bike since I was ten.' The doctor said , 'Well, it worked for Lance Armstrong .'

Attorneys for the U.S. Justice Department filed documents Friday that urge a federal judge to prevent Armstrong from using an “everybody was doing it” defense at trial when discussing his doping in cycling. If he loses the case, Armstrong, 45, could be on the hook for nearly $100 million in damages stemming from his time as a rider for the U.S. Postal Service cycling team.

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“Although he insists otherwise, Armstrong’s argument in fact shows that he intends to put the entire sport of cycling on trial,” said court documents submitted Friday by attorneys for the U.S. Justice Department. “To distract the jury from his own misdeeds, he seeks to present a lengthy and irrelevant 125-year history of doping in cycling, detailing, for example, long-deceased Tour de France riders’ reported use of heroin in the 1890s or amphetamines in the 1950s, and other non-USPS team riders’ use of EPO in the early 1990s.”

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People can hate on Armstrong all they want , but they shouldn' t think of any of these other riders on his team as Armstrong victims. So yes, Lance Armstrong lied, cheated, and doped. But like the old saying goes, do we really have to make a federal case out of it ? Share.

Everybody has their version of Lance Armstrong , and I have mine. The things we've heard don ' t line up with the guy I know. That's my best answer. It was based on doing a book together about cancer that we both took a lot of pride in, and I want to make something clear.

The government is suing Armstrong on behalf of the U.S. Postal Service after the Postal Service paid $32.3 million to sponsor Armstrong’s cycling team from 2000 to 2004. The government says the cycling team violated its sponsorship contract with the Postal Service by using banned drugs and blood transfusions to cheat in races. It also alleges Armstrong concealed those violations by lying about them, effectively causing false claims to be submitted to the Postal Service to continue payment.

To keep the focus on Armstrong alone, the government wants U.S. District Judge Christopher Cooper to exclude evidence of performance-enhancing drug use by cyclists on other teams.  The government’s arguments were filed Friday in response to Armstrong’s efforts to allow a bigger picture of the sport’s doping culture to be presented at trial. Cooper will rule on it beforehand.

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And they were going to be asked in a more serious setting, be it under oath with the Feds or some other lawsuit. [The Oprah interview], it 's safe to say it was not It didn' t say , " Lance Armstrong 's the biggest a--h--- in the world, so we had to do this." Which is what you're insinuating, and I'd agree.

He thinks what Armstrong did in cycling is so evil, he should go to jail. “In 2001 in an interview you said , ‘If Lance is clean, it ’s the greatest comeback in the history of sports. Everybody was doing it = the playing field was equal.

Last month, Armstrong’s attorneys said the larger doping culture in the sport is relevant because Armstrong’s conduct “did not occur in a vacuum, nor did the USPS’ current expressions of shock and surprise that there was doping on their cycling team.”

They say the government’s assertions that Armstrong caused the team to dope and submit false claims are not true and the larger state of cycling helps show that.

If the government wins, it could get its money back times three under the False Claims Act – nearly $100 million. Armstrong could be on the hook for all of it, but his attorneys have vigorously contested the government’s case, especially the notion that the Postal Service suffered damages because of the cycling team’s doping.

“It is only fair for Armstrong to respond by demonstrating that it was the entirety of the sport that was 'encouraging' and 'facilitating' doping,” said Armstrong’s attorneys at the firm Keker, Van Nest & Peters.

The government sees it differently and also is trying to exclude the testimony of John Gleaves, an expert on the history of doping who was hired by Armstrong’s legal team.

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IamSlave. Sure what Lance did was wrong but some of you guys really take it way more seriously then it is . Hate to say this, but goddamn I'm tired of hearing about Lance Armstrong . Women 6. Pete's Dragon 7. Jackie 8. Kubo & Two Strings 9. Everybody Wants 10.

Lance Armstrong : " It 's been , as you would expect - well, maybe as you would expect, not as I expected. DR: Don ' t you have the keys to your own redemption? If you could just say what people want you to say , tell the full story, co-operate, that's there for you.

“Permitting Armstrong to parade this 'everybody was doing it' argument before the jury would unduly prejudice the Plaintiffs because it would mislead the jury into thinking that Armstrong should be given a pass for his (False Claims Act) violations because some of his competitors were also doping,” said the recent filing submitted by government attorneys, including Chad Readler, acting assistant attorney general for the Civil Division of the Justice Department.

“But, even if 'everybody' else was doping, everybody else was not lying to the USPS about that doping while inducing USPS to renew a lucrative sponsorship agreement.”

Armstrong doesn’t dispute his doping. He confessed to that on national television in 2013 – after more than a decade of denials. Instead, he’s defending himself in part by saying the Postal Service got what it bargained for with the sponsorship and received far more in benefits and publicity than the $32.3 million that was paid.

The case originated in 2010, when Armstrong’s teammate, Floyd Landis, filed a complaint against Armstrong under seal in federal court. The government joined Landis’ case in 2013, shortly after Armstrong’s doping confession. If the government’s case succeeds, Landis could get up to 25% of recovered damages as the whistleblower who first brought the case.

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