US Hawaii officials say ‘NO missile threat’ amid emergency alerts

22:06  13 january  2018
22:06  13 january  2018 Source:   MSN

Hawaii officials say 'false alarm' on alert about inbound ballistic missile

  Hawaii officials say 'false alarm' on alert about inbound ballistic missile Hawaii officials on Saturday announced that an alert saying a missile was headed for the state was a false alarm.Sen. Tulsi Gabbard (D-Hawaii) issued a tweet, saying she had confirmed with officials the alert was false.

People in Hawaii woke up to a terrifying emergency alert sent to iPhones and other devices that officials now say was sent in error. 9to5Mac Happy Hour. The emergency alert read ‘BALLISTIC MISSILE THREAT INBOUND TO HAWAII . SEEK IMMEDIATE SHELTER.

Hawaii emergency officials confirmed Saturday an alert that a ballistic missile was inbound to the island was a mistake. Earlier Saturday, Hawaiian citizens reported receiving an emergency alert on their phone that stated: “BALLISTIC MISSILE THREAT INBOUND TO HAWAII .

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Emergency alerts sent to the cellphones of Hawaii residents Saturday warning of a “ballistic missile threat” were a false alarm reportedly sent by mistake, officials said.

Shortly after 8 a.m. local time Saturday, several alarmed Hawaii residents began posting screenshots of alerts they had received, reading: “BALLISTIC MISSILE THREAT INBOUND TO HAWAII. SEEK IMMEDIATE SHELTER. THIS IS NOT A DRILL.”

Hawaii reps call for hearing on missile alerts after false alarm

  Hawaii reps call for hearing on missile alerts after false alarm Two U.S. Representatives from Hawaii have requested a panel hearing to discuss whether the state should remain in charge of sending emergency incoming missile alerts, following a false alarm sent out to people in the state on Saturday.Reps. Tulsi Gabbard (D) and Colleen Hanabusa (D) requested that the House Armed Services Committee holds a hearing in a letter sent Tuesday, suggesting that Hawaii's Emergency ManagemeReps. Tulsi Gabbard (D) and Colleen Hanabusa (D) requested that the House Armed Services Committee holds a hearing in a letter sent Tuesday, suggesting that Hawaii's Emergency Management Agency should retain control of disasters other than incoming missiles, which is a national security issue.

This alert was sent to phones in Hawaii . (Matthew Nelson/The Washington Post). Emergency alerts sent to Hawaiians warning of a “ballistic missile threat ” were reportedly false, officials said . Shortly after 8 a.m. local time Saturday

Hawaii emergency officials said an alert of a ballistic missile threat is a false alarm. The alert stated there was a threat "inbound to Hawaii " and for residents to seek shelter and that "this is not a drill."

The Hawaii Emergency Management Agency tweeted at 8:20 a.m. local time that there was no missile threat to the state.

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The U.S. Navy also confirmed in an email the emergency alerts had been sent in error.

“USPACOM has detected no ballistic missile threat to Hawaii,” Cmdr. Dave Benham, a spokesman for U.S. Pacific Command, said in an email. “Earlier message was sent in error. State of Hawaii will send out a correction message as soon as possible.”

a close up of a sign: This alert was sent to phones in Hawaii.© Matthew Nelson/The Washington Post/ This alert was sent to phones in Hawaii. At 8:45 a.m. local time, an additional alert was sent to Hawaii residents advising them that the first warning had been a false alarm.

Inside Hawaii's emergency alert command center

  Inside Hawaii's emergency alert command center In the aftermath, people across Hawaii were confronted with the question: What would I do if this were the real thing? "It's a wakeup call to say, 'Hey, wait a minute, I don't know what to do,'" Miyagi said. "Our opportunity right now is to reach out and get that information to the people."Miyagi says cellphone users weren't told about the error sooner because his agency didn't have procedures for issuing corrections. That's no longer the case.Another change: Two people will now be needed to send out alerts in the future.

HONOLULU — Hawaii emergency management officials say a push alert that warned of an incoming ballistic missile to Hawaii on Saturday was a mistake. The emergency alert sent to cellphones said in all caps, “Ballistic missile threat inbound to Hawaii .

On January 13, 2018, a false missile alert was sent to smartphones and televisions in the U.S. state of Hawaii . The warning, which appeared on phones in the form of a push alert and on TV sets as both an audio message and scrolling banner, stated that there was a ballistic missile threat to Hawaii

“There is no missile threat or danger to the State of Hawaii,” the follow-up alert read, according to screenshots of the message. “Repeat. False Alarm.”

It is unclear how or why the initial alert was sent out, and how many people received it. What was clear was that the first message caused a brief panic, at least on social media, among those who read it and expected the worst.

On CNN, Rep. Tulsi Gabbard (D-Hawaii) said she received the alert, called Hawaii officials and confirmed it was “an inadvertent message that was sent out.”

“You can only imagine what kicked in,” Gabbard told CNN. “This is a real threat facing Hawaii, so people got this message on their phones and they thought, 15 minutes, we have 15 minutes before me and my family could be dead.”

Less than two months ago, Hawaii reinstated its Cold War-era nuclear warning sirens amid growing fears of an attack by North Korea. Tests of the sirens were scheduled to be conducted on the first business day of every month for the foreseeable future.

Panic in the Pacific: How those in Hawaii reacted to missile threat

  Panic in the Pacific: How those in Hawaii reacted to missile threat Scenes of panic and worry played out across Hawaii Saturday as many residents and visitors to the islands tried to determine if the threat was genuine.Ben DuPree spent the morning of his daughter's second birthday cowering with his family in a bathtub in Kailua, Hawaii, fearing an incoming missile strike from North Korea.

Emergency alerts sent to Hawaii residents Saturday warning of a "ballistic missile threat " were a false alarm reportedly sent by mistake, officials Less than two months ago, Hawaii reinstated its Cold War-era nuclear warning sirens amid growing fears of an attack by North Korea.

Hawaii emergency officials confirmed that an alert about a ballistic missile bound for the island was sent by mistake. “ballistic missile threat inbound to hawaii . Seek immediate shelter. THIS IS NOT A DRILL,” the alert said .

The tests were an audible example of the growing strife with North Korea, which has spooked other communities in the still-hypothetical line of fire. Guam distributed a pamphlet on nuclear attack preparedness that encouraged people to avoid using conditioner, “as it will bind the toxins to your hair.” A 16-page bulletin released by emergency management authorities in California warned people to beware of radioactive pets.

Sen. Mazie Hirono (D-Hawaii), acknowledging the heightened tensions, admonished the wayward message and vowed to investigate how it occurred.

“At a time of heightened tensions, we need to make sure all information released to community is accurate,” Hirono tweeted Saturday. “We need to get to the bottom of what happened and make sure it never happens again.”

Even as information was scarce, there were calls on Twitter for anyone who was responsible for sending the message in error to be held accountable.

Sen. Brian Schatz (D-Hawaii) said the false alarm was based on “a human error.”

“There is nothing more important to Hawai’i than professionalizing and fool-proofing this process,” Schatz tweeted Saturday.

He added in a subsequent tweet: “What happened today is totally inexcusable. The whole state was terrified. There needs to be tough and quick accountability and a fixed process.”

Paul Kane, Brittany Lyte and Cleve R. Wootson Jr. contributed to this article.

Hawaii has been preparing for missile attack, now its credibility is under fire .
Hawaii has taken emergency preparedness very seriously. In December, the state started testing its nuclear warning siren system aimed at alerting residents to an impending nuclear missile strike. This was the first of such tests in Hawaii since the end of the Cold War.Officials have said that the purpose of these tests is not to scare the public, but to keep them aware. Then, on Saturday an emergency missile alert accidentally went out to everyone in Hawaii, causing mass panic as people thought they were about to die. The false alarm has come under criticism from officials, the FCC, residents and others in Hawaii.

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