US Panel moves to strike anti-gay phrase in Alabama sex ed law

20:21  14 february  2018
20:21  14 february  2018 Source:   ap.org

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MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — Alabama lawmakers on Wednesday took the first step to strike anti - gay language from the state's sex education law that says students should be taught that

Education . (AP) — Alabama lawmakers on Wednesday took the first step to strike anti - gay language from the state's sex education law that says students should be taught that homosexuality is both socially unacceptable and illegal.

MONTGOMERY, Ala. — Alabama lawmakers are moving to strike anti-gay language from the state's sex education law.

The current law says students are to be taught that homosexuality is a lifestyle that's not "acceptable to the general public."

The Senate Education Policy Committee voted Wednesday to delete that phrase, sending the bill to the full Senate.

Republican Sen Tom Whatley, the bill's sponsor, says the bill clears up language in the law.

Although sex education is optional in Alabama's public schools, a 1992 law sets requirements for programs.

The bill also deletes a requirement that students learn homosexual conduct is a criminal offense. That was a reference to Alabama's anti-sodomy law, which has since been ruled unconstitutional.

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